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Full text of "The men who advertise : an account of successful advertisers, together with hints on the method of advertising"



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GENERAL CONTENTS. 



Tin; Mkn Who AnvKirrisi:, - - - - Page 1. 

A.MKiacAN' Xinvsi'Ai'Kii R.vtkBook, - - " 209. 

A.MKIilCAX NKNV.Sl'ArEU L)l l{i;( TOliY, - - - "Gil. 



THE 



MEN WHO ADVERTISE; 



AN ACCOUNT OF 



SUCCESSFUL ADVERTISERS, 



TOGETHER WIT] 



Hints on the Method of Advertising, 



NEW YORK: 

NELSON CHESMAN, Publisher for GEO. P. POWELL & CO., Newspaper Advertising Acents, 

1870. 



KlltlTl'll lU-( 



vi'iir 1S70, 



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111 the < IfikV <)1Vk<' nl III.' Di-lrici ( oiiil ol tin- liiitod Slate.-- lor the- 
X. mil. Til Di-tfi.t of New Vol! . 



PREFACE 



All advertisement is in its nature transitory and i:»erisliing. It is not pre- 
served in archives and libraries, except by accident, and when so connected 
with news and literature that to dissever it is impossible. Yet of all the in- 
fluences to make known the existence of one man to another, Avith his aims 
and views, the advertisement is the most potent. Millions who have never 
heard of Napoleon, his victories and defeats, the sad story of his invasion of 
the frozen North and his woeful return, have heard of Holloway, the most 
general advertiser of our day. And this has not been done solely nor 
chiefly through the merits of his remedies, but by his unequaled use of the 
art of advertising, a method little known, but yielding to those who assiduously 
study and practice it a golden shower when backed by any real merit in the 
articles sold. We propose in this book to give a few liiographies of those 
advertisers best known and longest-establislied in our country, with sketches 
of their lives and hints of the way in which success became theirs. Not all 
who advertise make money. It can be as easily thrown away in that direc- 
tion as in any other, unless skill is employed in its use, and those whom we 
record in our pages have either made a special study of its minutiffi or have 
employed able assistants. Almost all of the persons whom we have attempted 
to sketch began poor, lived sparingly, and worked industriously. Their suc- 
cess was not fortuitous, but the result of knowledge. They had, also, a good 
article to be disposed of No amount of advertising Avould have sold a 
mower and reaper or a sewing-machine largely if there had not been real, sub- 
stantial merit in the production, nor will it avail to advertise a drug store 
for sale in the Iron Age, or an iron foundry in the Bniggisfs Circular 
Transpose the advertisements and there is value in them ; leave them as we 
have indicated and they are thrown away. 

It is no longer practicable to have such an accurate or general knowledge 
of the value of advertising mediums as was possible before they became so 
very numerous, unless the whole time of several persons is devoted to it, and 
most advertisers, therefore, are content to leave this matter with an acute and 
well-informed advertising agent, of whom one or more are to be found in the 
larger cities. With care on the part of the advertiser and occasional scrutiny 
of the work done, it is possible to obtain a much wider publicity for a given 
sum of money than can be done by ill-directed eff"orts. All ncAvspaper pub- 



4 PREFACE. 

lishers, with one or two exceptions, in the United States, give commissions to 
agents, and the great mnjority will give none to any one else, and while, in 
old-established tirms who do their own advertising, a very close approxima- 
tion in economy is obtained, we do not believe it can ever entirely equal that 
of a well-conducted agency. We point in proof of this to those large firms 
who keep an advertising clerk, or who are in kindred business, such as the 
New York Tribune and the proprietors of Drake's Plantation Bitters. It 
cannot l)ut be 8upj)Osed tliat in such large business there is not a perfect 
understanding of the requirements, yet they contract mainly through agents. 
They feel satisfied tliat they cannot do it for themselves so cheaply. 

We also have endeavored to set forth in our pages the superiority of ad- 
vertising in newspapers over that of other kinds. The liandbills are thrown 
away and the posters not read, and it is safe to say that an advertisement cost- 
ing five dollars w^ill reacli twice as many ])eople and be read by twice as many 
as the same money put in a handbill. Take the New York Tribune, charging 
in the Weekly thirty-six hundred dollars a page, and we take this because its 
rates are the highest and the size of the page the largest. It circulates about 
two hundred thousand copies. Place this same matter in the shape of a cir- 
cular and distribute it, and it will be found to be mucli less generally read, 
besides costing more. 

We return our thanks to those persons to whom we are indebted for facts 
contained in this collection of sketches, and to many of those of whom we 
write for their kindness in j/Ormitting us to obtain access to documents and 
letters calculated to make a narrative clear and vivid, and to avoid the errors 
into which a biographer is apt to luii. 

Bound uj) with the ^Nlen who Advert isi' will be fotnid our News})a])er 
Rate-Hook and Newspajiei- Directory, thus uniting the advantages of all in 
one volume. 



INDEX 



Abbott, T. R., opinion of, . . Page 

About Aflvertising 

Adriance, Piatt & Co. 

Advantage of Agencies, 
Advantages of an Advertising Agency, 
Advertising Agencies, Charleston Courier on, 
Advertising Agencies, Delaicare Jiepublican on 
Advertising Agencies, Star Spangled Banner 

on, 

Advertising and its results. 

Advertising, an English opinion of, 

Advertising Aphorisms, 

Advertising by Driblets, 

Agencies best for Extensive Advertisers 

Agency plan the best, 

A good Firm to deal with, 

Allen, E.G., 

Allen, R. H. & Co., ... 
Art of Advertising, . 
Auxiliary Printing, 
Barnum on Advertising, . 
Barnum, Phineas T., . . . 
Batchelder & Co., testimony of, 
Bonner, Robert, .... 
Brown, S. N. & Co., . 

Burr, J. B., 

Business House, a model, 
Childs, George W., .... 

Cool, 

Cost of Advertising, 

Customers, gregarious. 

Demorest, Madame, 

Devlin & Co., .... 

Directions to Advertisers, . 

Dodge, William C, 

Drake, P. H., letter from. 

Dull Times best for Advertisers, 

Dull tools, 

Durno, James, testimonv of, . 
Editorial Puffing, .... 
Editorial pulTs, value of, . 

Estev, J. & Co., 

Evans, T. W., .... 
Experienced Trademan's opinion 
Experience of an Advertiser, 
Fahnestoek, Haslet & Schwartz, 
Fairbanks, E. & T. & Co., 
Flack, Prof. Alonzo, 
Forney on Advertising, . 
Fowle, Seth W. & Son, . 
Fullam, A.J., .... 

Good Advice 

Government Loan, advertising the. 
Great American Tea Company, 
Growing Crop, advertising like a. 
Harper & Brothers, 
Helmbold, Henry T., . 

Heni-y, John F 

High Art 

Holloway, Thomas, 

Hostetter & Smith, .... 

Howe, Elias, 

How to Advertise, .... 



ncy^ 



How to succeed in Business, 
Hunter, Henrv E., . . . 
Hurd & Houghton, 
Indispensable Publication, an. 
Inside view of an Advertising A 
Jayne, David, .... 
Jones, Joshua R., . 
Judd, Orange, .... 
Judicious Advertising, . 
Judicious vs. injudicious Advertisi 
King, H. A., certificate from, 
Kinzey and the counti-^- milliner, 
Knox, Charles, . ' . 

Landis, Charles K., 
Liberal Advertising, 
Liberal and discreet Advertising, 
Lippincott & Bakewell, 
Lippincott, J. B. & Co., . 
Live Advertisements, . 
Lorillard, Peter, .... 
Model Establishment, . 

Moore, D.D.T 

Newspaper testimony, . 

New York Independent, 

Novel method of choosing a Husband, 

01)jections answered, 

" dutsides" and " Insides," Wester 

Packard, Silas S., 

Patent Medicine Business, . 

Persistencv, value of, 

Peterson, t. B 

Pittoik, John W 

Quitting Advertising, 
Recommendation, 
Reward, a just, ... 

Rule for Advertising, 
I Schenck, Joseph H., 
Scranton, S. S., . 
I Shaw, Charles A., . 
: Shaw, on persistent Advertising 

Short but steady Advertising, 

Small Advertisements, 

Spencer, S. M. & Co., 

Spurious Advertising, 

Steck, G.& Co., 

Steinway & Sons, 

StcAvart, Alexander T., . 

Stewart on Advertising, . 

Strike often, .... 

Striking instance of success, . 

Success of Advertising, . 

Sun, New York, . . . 

Systematic Advertising, 
j Union Pacific Railroad, . 

Valuable In-vestment, 

Vitk, James, .... 

Wanamaker, John, . 

Waters, Horace 

Wells, Samuel R 

What is worth doing at all is \\ 

well, 

' Why do you Advertise ? . 
, Writing Advertisements, 



Page lOS 
. 100 

98 

. 133 

187 

. 31 

36 
. 1.57 

99 
. 1.t2 



119 
1-2.5 
177 
109 
44 
173 
84 
85 
KiO 
131 



43 
142 

69 
128 

62 

11 
142 
and 164 
116 

88 



doing 



132 
89 
57 
186 
204 
127 
122 
137 
112 
35 
140 
47 
1.53 

lis 

126 
107 
146 



E. AND T. FAIRBANKS & CO. 



Among the Americans whose names have become historical in connection 
with great and useful inventions, none perhaps are more extensively known 
among all nations, in every clime, in every section of the globe where civili- 
zation has opened by-Avays for traffic and avenues for commerce, than that of 
Fairbanks, who, within the last thirty-five years, has given to merchants and 
traffickei-s all over the earth a standard measure for nearly all the commodities 
which men buy and sell. 

Go where you will; visit every county and hamlet in the American 
Union ; extend your travels to Central and South America ; cover in your 
pilgrimage the continent of Europe ; then visit Asia and the islands of the 
sea; and on whatever soil you stand, wherever men buy and sell, there will 
you meet with the name of " Fairbanks " painted upon his great arbiter be- 
tween buyer and seller — the Platform Scale. 

Erastus Fairbanks was born in Brimfield, Massachusetts, and in 1812, at 
the age of nineteen years, he Avent to St. Johnsbury, Vermont. His early 
life is but the history of many Americans Avho have died honored and 
Avealthy. It Avas a succession of struggles and privations. Erastus Avas fol- 
loAved to St. Johnsbury by his only brothers, Thaddeus and Joseph P. Fair- 
banks. About the year 1830 the "hemp fever" broke out in Central 
Vermont. In Caledonia as Avell as Lamille County, the farmers entered 
largely into its production; and it Avas this enterprise, Avhich eventually 
proved so unprofitable to those who engaged in it, that gave birth to one of 
the most important instruments in the civilized Avorld — the Platform Scale. 

It came about something in this Avise : Merchants and others made con- 
tracts to purchase hemp by Aveight, and, as it Avas a slow process to weigh 
such bulky material Avith the old-fashioned steelyards, Mr. .Thaddeus Fair- 
banks, the second brother, Avho has great inventive talent, by this circum- 
stance had his attention called to the science of Aveighing, and in a short 
time he invented and had constructed a rude apparatus which he suspended 
in a frame building, and Avhich ansAvered the purpose of Aveighing this hemp. 
This rude Aveighing machine Avas the first platform scale ; for, although there 
have been various and multiform improvements since, the principle of lev- 
erage, etc., upon Avhich that instrument Avas gotten up, is precisely the same 
as that of the Platform Scale to-day. 



10 THE mi;n who advkrtise. 

Tlu' iiiM-iiturs lnotlier. Krastus. difsc-overt'il at <>iu-e tlial this was a useful 
invention, and a patent was applie<l for and obtained. This in V)rief was the 
coninienceinent of the scale business, whieh has now grown into world-wide 
notoriety. It inerease<l very slowly for the first ten years; but from 1842 to 
1857 it (loubled every three years. Owing to the fin.meial ])anic of the latter 
year there was a slow increase for several years. Imt since ISCl) it has grown 
with inimen.se strides. 

Early in the liistory of this enterprise orders began to be received from 
foreign countries, and these are growing larger year by year, the scales being 
adjusted to the standard of the nation ordering the same. Two large orders 
have been received from Russia the present year, one of which amounted 
to several thousand dollars. The.se scales now go all over tlie civ- 
ilized worM. There is scarcely a country yet discovered, where there is 
trade and commerce, that one will not find the magic name of Fairbanks con- 
fronting him from the just and even balance with which men buy, sell, and 
get gain. 

The Fairbanks Scales are all made under the eye of the inventor, at their 
manufactory at St. Johnsbury, Vermont. Their product now amounts to a 
million and a quarter dollars annually. The consum])tion of iron, lumber, 
coal, etc., is immense. They melt up into scales sixteen tons of pig iron each 
working day. The yearly consumption of lumlier into the manufacture of 
wooden pillars, boxes for packing the scales, etc., is over a million an<l a halt 
feet annually. Over one thousand tons of coal and two thousand cords of 
wood are yearly consumed. In their manufacture over five hundred men are 
employed, and this force is turning out eight hundred scales a week, or more 
than forty thousand scales a year. This Company has put in over three 
thousand large track and depot scales in this country. All scales are divided 
into three classes — Depot and Hay Scales, Portable l*latform Scales, and 
Counter Scales. The present shop number of the Hay and Track Scales is 
over twenty-two thousand; that of the Platform Scale, over one hundred and 
eighty-seven thoiis.unl. while the smalli i- sc.ilcs have not been numbered, and 
are innumerable. The shijnnents tVoiii St. .lolmshury over the Passump.sic 
Ilailroad, both ways, now amount to nine thousand tons annually. 

Does the reader think such a business as this has been created, ami that, 
too, far away from the business centers, without the aid of printer's ink? 
No, the men at the head of this establishment are too far-seeing and sagacious 
not to knf)W that, having a good thing, they must let the world know of it — 
and in what way so reailily or so cheaiily ;is l)y .-nlvertising ? Foi- sevei'al 
years their adveiM isinir liills li;i\c exceeded thirty llioiisand doll.ars annuallv; 
and in ISOS they :nn<iiinled to thirty t wo thousan.l li\i' hundred dollars. The 
largest order ever gi\en to ,i single paper, before the war, was for a single in- 
sertion of an illustr.iteil advertisement in the \e\\ ^drk Trihu>v> (to run 
through all the editions, ilaily, semi-weekly, ami weekly), .ind which amounted 
to the snug little sum of three thousand doll.irs, Tliey were ^(, w«'ll satisfii-d 
with its I'esnits ,h;it tliry would l.c -lad to dnplic'ite tli;it older any d:iy. 

Tlie o|,h-st .•nri yomiovst of tl,,. tlii-ce brothers who origin.ally consti- 
tiitrd tl,.. lirni m|- K. .V- T, l''.iirb;niks A- Co. .lied some years since." but tlie 
tii-m name rem.-iins unehan^ed. The tirm now con.si.sts of Thaddeus Fair- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 11 

banks, the original inventor, and Horace and Franklin Fairbanks, sons of 
Gov. Erastus Fairbanks. It is not our design in this article to speak of the 
men, only of their business and how it has grown, but we cannot in justice 
close this hasty sketch without saying that they are all men of strict integrity 
and moral worth. They have always gone upon the principle that what was 
worth doing was worth doing well. Hence every scale before it leaves their 
shops must be perfect, accurate and durable. A village has grown up about 
these men which jDartakes in a measure of their thrift, taste, and enterprise. 
Foremost in every good word and work, they convey the impression to all 
that, Avhen they are weighed in the just and even balance of the great Weigh- 
master of us all, they will not be found wanting. 



A Good Firm to Deal With. — We can say most emphatically, and all 
the agents and publishers will agree with us, that there is no more enterpris- 
ing, faithful, and satisfactory house to deal with than that of Rowell &, Co. 
They never let a bill be presented twice, and pay daily all accounts received 
by mail. They have the monopoly of space and location in seven hundred 
newspapers, and know, by experience, just when to invest money to the best 
advantage. 

Mr. Rowell is a New England man of the best type — genial, careful, 
original. The editorship of the Advertiser's Gazette is marked by real news- 
paper genius. We can do no more than to say to our readers that if they 
have any ideas about advertising that are not reduced to exact shape, they 
will find it greatly to their advantage to spend an hour with this house. 

The great specialty of Rowell & Co. is country advertising. For this, 
they have unrivaled facilities, as an examination of their " lists " will serve to 
show. These "lists" are a specialty of themselves, and are of the greatest 
advantage to the advertiser. We rejoice at the wonderful growth and suc- 
cess of this house, which is doing so much to elevate to a profession that 
business which many would call accidental and out of the way. Advertising, 
the Avorld over, has a first place as a lever for money-making. — Anna2)olis 
Itepublican. 



Hox. Charles A. Shaw, of Biddeford, Maine, for many years a shrewd 
and successful advertiser, writes us that during his long experience he has 
never known an instance of persevering, systematic advertising which failed 
of success, and adds, " The most economical and expeditious method for the 
advertiser is to transact business through some experienced and responsible 
agency." We commend these remarks to advertisers generally, and are 
confident no one can heed without profiting by them. 



CIIAKLKS KNOX. 



Tlicre are scores of people living in and aioniid Ni>\v York city to-day 
who li.ive made immense fortunes by advertisiiiir- Tliat this is the l<ey to 
business success is now an axiom. The names of many manufacturers, traders, 
and gentlemen have now become household words throiighout America 
which but for this medium would have remaine<l in oblivion. Numerous in- 
stances of business success can be called to mind, c:u h one of which regards 
advertising as the foundation stone upon which the structure has been reared. 
There is Mr. Curtis, the " Soothing Syrup" man. He has made the name of 
Mrs. Winslow as familiar as that of Fanny Fei-n throughout the land. Tlie 
result is that tens of thousan(,ls of mothers ([wiet their babies on his syruj). 
He has a magnificent office on Fulton street, dresses in costly silk-velvet, wears 
l)rilliant diamonds, owns a fine house, keeps an estaldishment, lives at his ease, 
and is a gentleman. Then we lin\e Mr. T'uioii Ad.inis on Broadway, who 
commenced life poor, .md \\vu[ u)ioii tliat street with little or no cajtital. But 
lie made a sj)ecialty nf t)ic gentlemen's furnishing goods business. lie con- 
stantly sjtread his uainc and his trade before the j)eo))le, and to-day he is one 
of the few successful leading merchants. <loi's business annually to the amount 
of hundreds of thousands of dollars, lias an elegant residence in Yonkers, 
travels in Euro|i('. etc.. etc.. .ill .is ihc ri'sult of advertising. People who 
have visited the city of I'oughkccpsic. on the IIu<lson, have seen Prof. East- 
man's Business College, one of the ni.uNcls of tlic times, and having more 
students than the l^'niversities at Oxford :ind C.iMiluidge. England. cond)ined. 
The whole of this institution was liuill up liy Md\cil isiug. and nothing else. 
The young men tlockc.l to it fioiii .mH pails of the rnitcd States and C:inada, 
until at one lime it li:id u\ er twchc liuudrol. Xeaily :ill the churches and 
halls in the city h;«l to be turne.l into i-e<-it;itio!i rooms and school rooms. 
]*rof Eastman advertised far and near, taking whole p:i<j,-es of the 7'ril>ini( . In- 
ihpffiiltnt. etc. On Vesey street w c have the immense te:i estaldishmeiit oi'Mr. 
(iilm.m. who sometimes li;is thousands of \isitois a d:iy. .and during business 
hours sells nearly two hundred thousand pounds of tea and cott'ee. Orders 
come ]»ouring in from all p.arts ..t' the country I'oi- his te:i. lie ad\('rtises it in 
all the religious papers in the land, ,nul tlms i-e;iches the peopK' wlio consume 
it. He is obliged to purrliMse w hole cargoes at a time, .and has had to o])en 
branch stores all over this eitv ami UrooUlvn. We all know of the ---reat 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 13 

advertising feats of Bonner, Helmbold, Radway, Moffat, Brandreth, Colgate, 
and scores of other men who might be named. In every single instance a 
fortune has been made, and we never knew this result to fail where one has 
judiciously advertised. So the whole matter resolves itself into this : Decide 
to introduce some one thing to the American people, and then " push things." 
We do not care what it is, whether newspapers, bitters, tea, soap, medicine, 
hosiery, or hats; if it is anything which the people want they will purchase it 
if you only tell them where they can find it. And this brings us to speak of 
one of the foremost hatters in New York, Mr. Charles Knox. 

No longer ago than 1832 he landed in this city, a poor Irish boy, without 
money or friends. Now he owns a large block in the most celebrated quarter 
of the city, right under the shadow of the Herald building and St. Paul's 
Church, and touching the celebrated Park Bank building. Aye, even more 
than this, he has recently bought out Mr. Genin, who used to be the largest 
hatter in the city in the days of Jenny Lind and Barnum, for the purpose of 
establishing his only son in business. This is a remarkable success, and it was 
all done by advertising, as we shall show. 

There must have been something favorable in the soil, climate, or char- 
acter of the people of the town of Raymelton, Donegal County, Ireland, for 
it has given us three very successful business men. Here Mr. Robert Bonner 
was boi-n ; here Mr. Charles Knox first saw day light, in 1820, and from this 
same town came one of the foremost liquor merchants of Philadelphia. The 
parents of Charles came to this country when he was very young, and his 
father, Avho was a coppersmith, failed in business here, and soon after died. 
When Charles was twelve years of age, and his sister seven, they started from 
their native town, for the port of Londonderry, in a country wagon. By mis- 
take they took a ship bound for Wilmington, Del., and it was only after a 
tedious journey that they reached this city. The voyage was of eight months' 
duration, and before it was over the crowded passengers suffered with small- 
pox, Charles being one of the first to have it. He finally landed at the foot 
of Yesey street in New York, just as the Asiatic cholera was raging feaifully. 
A few years afterwards, 1835, a large part of the city was destroyed by fire. 
So the times were not very propitious for a young Irish boy to commence life 
on his own responsibility. He soon engaged himself to a book merchant as 
an errand boy, at twelve shillings a week. Here he remained for a year, when 
he entered the hat establishment of Leary & Co., who used to keep at 105 
Broad street, as an apprentice to the trade. Here he served his time, and 
finally rose to be the foreman of the establishment. Thus he continued until 
1845, when he resolved to commence business for himself, which he did at 160 
Fulton street. There, without capital, he commenced a business which to-day 
is so vast that he has to employ half a thousand hands. In 1855 he moved to 
the corner on Broadway which he now occupies. In 1865 he lost something 
like sixty thousand dollars by Barnum's Museum fire, Avhich turned his store 
into ashes. But in four months his new one was up, and the business was 
going on as prosperously as before. 

The simple fact that Mr. Knox had hats to sell would never have made 
his fortune in the world. Having them, he was determined to let the people 
know it, and to this end he advertised extensively, calling to his aid all the 



14 THE MKN WHO ADVERTISE. 

daily papers of the city, since it was tVom New Yorkers that he expected to 
obtain the most of his custom. He has always advertised liberally and per- 
si.stently, and to this he attributes liis threat success. He has not indulged in 
Avliole page advertisements, but he always keeps his name and his wares be- 
fore the people. He is a great friend of the " special notice" column of the 
newppaj)ers, and has the hap|)y faculty of making his advertisements short, 
pithy, pt)pular, readable and attractive. This is done by always connecting 
them with .some topic or event which is the conversation of the hour. The 
following may be taken as samples: 

" Although Queen Isabella has lost her crown, tlie crowns of Knox's hats 
never come out, as every one wlio purchases them at the corner of Broadway 
and Fulton street will testify. " 

" ' All that glitters is not gold.' Not so. however, with Knox's hats,"' etc. 

"If Mr. Johnson is turned out of the White House, he'll want one of 
Knox's hats,'' etc. 

"Not a man who w»»re Knox's hats during the earthquake in San Fran- 
cisco had them shaken off." 

" If Miss Kellogg ever marries, she will prefer a man who wears Knox's 
hats." 

"The Grecian bend may do to/ tlie ladies, but all gentlemen wear 
Knox's hats." 

" The Wickedest Man in New York does not wear one of Knox's hats." 

Such advertisements as these are constantly .i]>pearing in all of the New 
York papers. The result is, everybody sees tluni, reads them, remembers 
that Mr. Knox is the hatter, and rushes to his store to ])urchase. When they 
get there they find a large room, elegantly fitted up, with black walnut cases, 
a crowd of polite clerks, and a large assortment of hats. Nothing but a good 
and fashionable article is offered for sale, and the customer goes away satis- 
fied. So it has come about that Daniel Webster and Abraham Lincoln, 
Thurlow Weed, Horace Greeley, James Gordon Bennett, Daniel Lord, and 
scores of other men, have bought their hats of Mr. Charles Knox. 

Mr. Knox is a genial, pleasant, happy man, and lives at No. 46 West 
Tenth street. He has two children, one son and one daughter. He is tem- 
perate, never used tobacco, and never went to a ball in his life. Pie is a man 
of genuine emotions, true sympathies, and hearty good will. He helps to fill 
five hmidred mouths with bread, and never discharges :i woiknian because the 
times are dull. And all this comes aliout as the ri'sult of sticking to one's 
business and advertising it. 



Hum Anr. — Geo. 1'. li'owcil S: Co., Advertising Agents, have made 
advertising a study. They who wish to advertise judiciously and cheaply 
can find no better meilium through wliich to reach the gri-at public than 
through Iheni.— \\',>rr<sf>r (.1A/.s-.v.) (iaz'td. 



ROBERT BOXNER. 



Mr. Bonner, says Matthew Hale Smith, in an interesting book published 
by J. B, Burr & Co., of Hartford, entitled " Sunshine and Shadow,'' was born 
in the north of Ireland, not far from Londonderry, near the spot from which 
A. T. Stewart emigrated. The Scotch Presbyterian blood that made General 
Jackson so famous, and has given success to the well-known house of Brown 
& Brothers, runs in the blood of Mr. Bonner. He is simply a Scotchman 
born in Ireland. He was trained under the influence of the Shorter Cate- 
chism. From the faith of his fathers he has nexer departed. He has been 
trustee for many years in a Scotch Presbyterian Church in the upper part of 
New York, and a liberal contributor to the support of public worship and 
the various forms of benevolence and charity. He is a conscientious business 
man, with great resources, with fertility of genius unmatched, and with in- 
domitable will, untiring industry, and more than all he possesses that crown- 
ing gift which Solomon received as an especial patrimony from God — 
" largeness of heart.'' 

He was distinguished in his boyhood for great manliness of character, for 
frank and generous impulses. When a boy was wronged or wrongly ac- 
cused, it was Bonner's custom to make the quarrel of his school-fellow his 
own. He allowed himself to be turned out of school for the part he took in 
defending a boy whom he knew to be innocent. At an early age he entered 
the printing office of the Hartford Courant to learn the art of printing. He 
was dexterous, swift at setting type, and led all the workmen in the nimble- 
ness with which he could set up an article. The President's Message, in 
those days, was transmitted by mail. The editor of the Courant purchased an 
advance copy, paying for it the enormous sum of thirty dollars ! The only 
advantage to be derived from this early copy was in getting the message out 
in advance of other papers. To a icomplish this, Mr. Bonner performed the 
unheard-of feat of setting seventeen hundred ems an hour. He performed 
all the duties connected with his position, became an accomplished printer, 
tried his hand at correspondence, and seated himself occasionally in the edi- 
torial chair. 

In 1844 Mr. Bonner removed to the city of New York. There was a 
popular impression that a literary paper could not succeed in this metropolis. 
Boston and Philadelphia monopolized the family newspapers and literary 



16 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

weeklies, ami it was sai>l that ii<> |>ai>er of tin- kiml ri>\\]<\ prospei- in this c-ity. 
Mr. Bonner tlioiiirht otherwi.se. He early re.solved to attempt a paper that 
shoul<l be eireulateil tliroughout the whole land. lIi- w atched his opportunity 
an<l bided his time, working hard in the meanwhile. an<l not being dainty in 
the plaee or style of business in whieh he engageil. Mayor Harper had been 
eleeteil as the American candidate. A paper called the Ainerirun Ii<j)ub//c'.ai 
was the organ of the i)arty. In this office Mr. IVinner commenced his New- 
York career. The wages paid him were small. His work AVas hard, and 
economy was re<piisite to enable him to live. He formed the liabit, front 
which lie lias never departed, of buying nothing that he could not pay for. 
He never borrowed a dollar of money, never signed a note in his life, and 
now carries on his great business on strictly cash principles, and literally owes 
no man anything. In some of his large enterprises he has paid his last dollar, 
and never has once failed in the venture he made. In some of his great ad- 
vertising feats, in which he has pai<l as high as twenty-live thousand dollars a 
week for advertising, he has been offered lines of papers to increase the adver- 
tisement to fifty thousand dollars, with unlimited credit, and his answer lias 
invariably been, ''I cannot advertise beyond my means. I have no more 
money to spend in that way." The whole business of the L'(/,/tr is conducted 
on the same jirinciple to-day. 

The Kepublh-aii was an evanescent affair, and Mr. Bonner Ibund permanent 
employment on the Evenhuj M'uror as a practical printer. This paper was con- 
ducted by Morris, Willis, and Fuller. It was Mr. Fuller's busine.ss to make 
up the paper. It was very desirable to display the advertisements, and do it 
in good taste. In this department Mr, Bonner excelled. The whole matter 
was soon left in his hands. He had an eye for beauty, and the Mirror adver- 
tisements became very famous. There was a small mercantile paj)er in Xew 
York, known as the Merchants Ledger.'" It was devoted almost entirely to 
commercial matters, with a very limited circulation. A young man. w hose 
business it was to get u]) advcrtiscnieiits. was struck witli the elegant niaiiiier 
in which Mr. Bonner made uj) the Mirror. He called the attention of the etli- 
tor of the Ltilyerlo Mr. Bonner's capacity, and this culminated in an engage- 
ment with Mr. Bonner to become the printer of that paper. Mr. Bonner did 
not own the material, but simply i>rinted the sheet. He occasionally wrote 
articles that attracte<l attention, from their ter.se, compact, and spicy compo- 
sition. A little incident showed Mr. Bonner the value of a nauu'. His con- 
tributions to the Iji'ihjer were very well received. The proprietor had a sjtice 
of jealousy about him. and he <lid not want his energetic and spirited printer 
to get into the editorial chair. Mi-. I>oiiin'r w rote a short, pithy ai't'cle on a 
popular subject. J;imme<l it into a little nook in the jLipcr. and placed at the 
bottom the name of Dr. ChalnuTs. It took like wildtirc It w.is copied into 
all the prf»minent papers of the laml. it t.night Mi-. rxnimT the value of a 
name — a lesson lie has never forgotten. 

Shortly after he entered the office. .Mr. IJomui purchased the L>,hj,r. lie 
seate<l himself in the editorial chair, and resolveii to reali/e the \ isions of his 
youth. He <lid not change its character at once, but grailually. The Li<l<i( r 
became less and less commercial, and mkuc ami more litei;ii'y. W out this 
time I'annv Vvvw was creatinir a ureal ^ell^ation in the litei.ii\ woild. Her 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 17 

Ruth Hall had just appeared, and the work and its authoress were criticised 
by the press in all parts of the land. She was the literary star of the day. 
The question was violently discussed whether she was or was not the sister 
of N. P. Willis. Mr. Bonner saw his opportunity, and sent a note to Fanny 
Fern, offering her twenty-five dollars a column to write a story for the Ledger. 
She declined the offer. Another proposition was sent, offering her fifty dol- 
lars a column. That she also declined. Seventy-five dollars were offered. 
That she declined, announcing that she did not intend to write any more for 
the newspapers. She admitted that she admired Mr. Bonner's pluck. Soon 
it was intimated to Mr. Bonner that if he would allow Fanny Fern to write 
a, story of ten columns, more or less, though the story should not occupy less 
than nine columns of the Ledger., she would undertake it. He closed the con- 
tract immediately, received the manuscript, read six lines, and sent her a 
check for one thousand dollars. He resolved, with this story, to introduce 
a new era in the Ledger. He changed the form and double-leaded the 
stoi-y, so that it made twenty columns in the paper. He advertised it as 
nothing was ever advertised before. He had paid an unheard-of sum for a 
story — one hundred dollars a column. The harvest was a golden one. Out 
of the profits of that story Mr. Bonner purchased the pleasant residence in 
this city in which he still lives. 

In the magnitude of his advertising Mr. Bonner has displayed the re- 
markable business skill for which he is celebrated. The manner of commend- 
ing the Ledger to the public is wholly his own. When he startled the public 
by his extravagance in taking columns of a daily journal, or one entire side, 
he secured the end he had in view. His method of repeating three or four 
lines, such as — " Fanny Fern writes only for the Ledger'' — or, " Read Mrs. 
Southworth's new story in the Ledger'' — and this repeated over and over and 
over again, till men turned from it in disgust, and did not conceal their ill- 
temper, was a system of itself " What is the use," said a man to Mr. Bon- 
ner, " of your taking the whole side of the Herald., and repeating that state- 
ment a thousand times ?" " Would you have asked me that question,"' replied 
Mr. Bonner, " if I had inserted it but once ? I put it in to attract your 
attention, and make you ask that question." 

Mr. Bonner know^s how to reach the public. He pays liberally, but in- 
tends to have the worth of his money. He does not advertise twice alike. 
The newspapers are afraid of him. His advertisements are so queer and 
unusual that when they make a contract with him they have no idea in what 
shape the advertisement will come. Sometimes it is in the shape of a frag- 
ment of a story ; sometimes the page will be nearly blank, with two or three 
little items in it. In his peculiar style of ^advertising he often gives great 
trouble to the editors of the leading papers. Sometimes an entire page is 
almost blank. Sometimes a few small advertisements occupy the corner, 
giving the sheet a peculiar appearance, which attracts attention. Said an 
editor, " I had rather publish one of your horses in the centre than have such 
A looking sheet." But Mr. Bonner's purpose was answered by one insertion, 
^nd the contract was withdrawn. 

' With a manliness and liberality peculiar to Mr. Bonner, after one inser- 
2 



18 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

tion, if the p.irtifs are dissatisfied, he always throws up the contract, however" 
beneficial it might have proved to him. 

His mode of advertising was new, and it excited botli astonishment and 
ridicule. His ruin was predicted over and over again. But as he paid as he 
went along he alone would be the sufferer. He was assailed in various ways. 
Men sneered at his writers, as well as at the method in which he made them 
known. He had no competition. Just then it w^as announced that the Har- 
pers were to put a first-class Weekly into the field. The announcement was 
hailed w4th delight by many classes. Men who had been predicting Bonner's 
ruin from the start were anxious to see it accomplished. He had agents in 
all the leading cities in the land. These held a monopoly of the Ledger. The 
book men and newspaper men, who were left out, were quite willing to have 
the Ledger go under. The respectability and wealth of the house, its enter- 
prise, with the class of writers it could secure, made the new paper a danger- 
ous rival. Mr. Bonner concluded to make the first issue serviceable to himself. 
His paragraph advertising was considered sensational, and smacking of the 
charlatan. He resolved to make it respectable. He wrote a half column in sensa- 
tional style — " Buy y/rt/y>f y'*' Weekh/' — "Buy Harper'' s Weekly" — "Buy Ilar- 
per^s Weekly'' — "Buy ILirpeis Weekly' — and so on through the half column. 
Through his advertising agent he sent this advertisement to the Herald^ 2'ri- 
bune, and Timea, and paid for its insertion. Among the astonished readers of 
this Ledger style of advertising were the quiet gentlemen who do business on 
Franklin Square. The community were astonished. " The Harpers are waking 
up!"' "This is the Bonner style!'" "This is the way the I^edger man does 
it !" w^ere heard on all sides. The young Harpers were congratulated by the 
book men everywhere on the enterprise with which they were pushing the 
new publication. They said nothing, and took the joke in good part. But it 
settled the respectability of the Ledger style of advertising. It is now imi- 
tated by the leading j)ublishers, insurance men, and most eminent dry-goods 
men in the country. The sums s|)ent by Mr. Bonner in advertising are per- 
fectly marvellous. He never advertises unless he has something new to pre- 
sent to the public. He pays from five to twenty-five thousand dollars a week 
when he advertises. The enormous circulation of the I^edger, over three 
hundred thousand copies a week, shows how profitable his style of doing 
business is. Nearly everything he does, every horse he buys, or new^ personal 
movement that distinguishes him, is set down to a desire on his part for 
gratuitous advertising. Of course he has an eye to business in whatever he 
does. But all the advertising he wants he is quite ready to pay for. 

The popularity given to a little scpiib of his own, to which the name of 
Dr. (/halmers was attached, taught Mr. Bonner a lesson he never forgot. Mr. 
Edward P]verett had taken upon himself to aid the ladies of America in pur- 
chasing Mount Veriioii, .Mr. Bonner resolved to secure Mr. Everett as a 
writer for the Ledger. He knew that money could not ])urchase ."Mr. Everett's 
connection with his i)aj)er. He ottered Mr. Everett ten thousand dollars to 
write a .series of articles for the Ledger., the money to be approj>riate<l to the 
purchase of the tomb of the father of his country. Mr. Everett could do no 
less than accept. At the conclusion of the Blount Vernon papers Mr. Everett 
continued on the Ledger until his death. Mr. Bonner paid him over fifty 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 19 

thousand dollars for services rendered on his paper. The notices to corre- 
spondents, which is a marked feature in the jLedyer, contain answers to ques- 
tions sent to the editor. Not more than one qiiestion in five is replied to. 
Those answers are written by the most eminent men in the country. Many 
of them were written by Mr. Everett, Henry Ward Beecher, and distinguished 
statesmen and lawyers. The connection between Mr. Bonner and Mr. 
Everett was of the most delicate and tender character, as Mr. Everett's con- 
fidential letters sufficiently show. 

It was Mr. Bonner's policy to spike every gun that could be aimed 
against him, and make every influence and every prominent man his ally. 
To this end J. G. Bennett, of the Herald., Henry J. Raymond, of the Times., 
and Horace Greeley, of the Tribune., became contributors to the Ledger. 

The Ledger was objected to in some quarters as not being a suitable sheet 
for young persons to read. Mr. Bonner secured the services of presidents 
of twelve of the principal colleges in this country to write for his paper. Of 
course it would not be imj)roper for the young men in colleges to take a 
paper for which the president wrote. Indeed, over the purity of expression 
and chasteness of sentiment and utterance in what appears in the Ledger., Mr. 
Bonner exercises a rigorous censorship. There are a great many articles and 
advertisements that appear in religious papers that Avould not be admitted 
into the Ledger. Mr. Bonner gives this order : " Take the most pious old 
lady in a Presbyterian Church, and any word or phrase, innuendo or expres- 
sion, that she would want to skip, if she were reading a Ledger story to her 
grandchild, strike out." 

Paul Morphy, in the height of his popularity, edited a chess column in 
the Ledger. Bryant, Willis, Halleck, Morris, and Saxe laid a poetical wreath 
at Mr. Bonner's feet. Prentice, Bancroft, Parton, and Cozzens joined the 
galaxy oi Ledger writers. Fanny Fern, Mrs. Southworth, and other eminent 
novelists furnished the entertaining serials published by Mr. Bonner. 

On the death of Mr. Everett, Mr. Bonner enclosed a check to Mr. Ban- 
croft, with a note requesting him to prepare a suitable article for the T^edger 
in commemoration of the distinguished stateman. The article was prepared 
and sent to Mr. Bonner. It contained no allusion to Mr. Everett's connection 
with the Ledger. The article was sent back, and the omission pointed out. 
A sharp correspondence followed, in which Mr. Bancroft attempted to es- 
tablish the propriety of the omission. Mr. Bonner refused to receive the 
article, and he finally carried his point, and Mr. Everett's connection with 
the Ledger bad a marked place in the eulogistic article. 

For a long time Mr. Beecher has been a contributor to the Ledger. One 
evening Mr. Bonner and his wife went over to Plymouth Church to hear the 
pastor. The sei-mon was on success in life, and was given in Mr. Beecher's 
most vigorous strain. He showed that smartness, acuteness, and adroitness 
would not lead to success unless they were combined with energy, a knowl- 
edge of business, an indomitable perseverance, and an integrity which would 
enable a man to dai-e to do right. If Beecher had intended to hit Mr. Bon- 
ner's character and success, he could not have come nearer to the mark. 
Mr. Bonner had lacked not one of the elements. Mr. Beecher had described, 
and every one knew his success. This sermon aifected Mr. Bonner in various 



20 TIIK MEN WHO ADVhRTISE. 

ways. He was in seairli of a novelty that shoulil captivate and protit tlie 
public. Why should not Mr. Beecher speak to a million of people through the 
Li'dger^ as well as speak to a single congregation witliin the walls of his house? 
His acquaintance with man had been large. His wit and fancy were exu- 
berant, and if he would write a story for the Ledger he might preach in it as 
much as he pleased, put money in his purse, and benetit the youth of the 
country. 

While Mr. Beecher was attending a council in his own church, a letter 
was put into his hands. He had had no conversation with Mr. Bonner about 
writing a story. The letter contained a propo.sal that Mr. Beecher should 
write a serial for the Ledger, and named the price which would be paid for it, 
which was perfectly astounding. " Miracles will never cease," said Mr. 
Beecher, in his note replying to the proposal. Norwood appeared, and the 
increased circulation of the Ledger immediately reimlnirsed Mr. Bonner for 
his extraordinary outlay. The story was longer than was expected, and an 
acblition was made to the price agreed upon. In this way the editor of the 
Ledger treats all his first-class writers. He is generous in his proposals, and 
does more than he agrees. 

When a printer's boy, Bonner's rule was to be the first boy in the office. 
When he was a printer he allowed no one to excel him in the swiftness with 
which he set type, and in his ability as a workman. When he purchased the 
Ledger he intended to make it the foremost paper in the country. He re- 
solved to own the most celebrated and fastest horses in the world. And his 
studs, which are kept in his stables on Twenty-seventh street, are without 
rivals. His horses are seven in number. " Lantern" is a bay, fifteen and a 
half hands high, with long tail, mild, clear eye, white hind feet, and white 
streak on his lace. He is very fleet, having made a mile in 2:20. " Peerless" 
is a gray mare, about fifteen and a half hands high, with a long white tail, 
clean-liml)ed and gentle. She has made the fastest time on record to a 
wagon, trotting her mile in 2:23i. She is so gentle that she is used in the 
country by the ladies of Mr. Bonner's family. " Flatbush IVfare" is a double 
teamster, and with '' Lady Palmer," in double harness, has made the fastest 
time ever trotted in a two-mile heat to a x*oad wagon — 5:0H. She is fif- 
teen and a half hands liigli. The other is a chestnut sorrel, about the same 
size. She has a fine head, and is very symmetrical. Besides her famous time 
with " Flatbush Mnre," she has trotted two miles, to a three hundred and 
sixteen )>ouii(l w agon and driver, in 4:59, the greatest feat of the kind ever 
performed. ' Pocahontas" is the handsomest trotter and the most perfectly 
formed horse in the world. She stands about fifteen hands, is a dark, rich 
bay, has a very fine head, proudly-arched nostrils, and a tail sweeping the 
groun<l for four inches, on which she frecpiently treads while standing. When 
six years old this splendid animal trotted in 2:23. and has made better time 
since she came into Mr. Bonner's hands. The " Auburn Horse" is sorrel, and 
of enormous size, being sixteen and a half haii<ls, with \o\\v white foot and 
white face, ])ronounced by Hiram Woodrutf to be the I'astost horse lie ever 
drove. The chamj)ion oj" the turl" is " Dexter," with siiu^wy form, and joints 
like a greyhound, compactly built, ihwk brown in color, with four white feet, 
and a white nose aixl stre;il<, a bright clear eye, and a flowing tail. He has 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 21 

made a mile in 2:17? in harness, and 2:18 to a saddle. The annals of the 
world present no parallel to this. Mr. Bonner buys his horses for his own 
pleasure. He drives them himself, and is one of the best horsemen in the 
country. He will not allow his horses to be used for show or for gain. He 
races with nol)ody. and bets with nobody. If any team can make fastei- time 
than his, driven by the owner, ten thousand dollars are deposited, and that 
owner may apply that sum to any benevolent cause that he pleases. Mil- 
lionaires gnash their teeth as Bonner drives by them. There are horsemen 
in New York who would give twenty-five thousand dollars for a pair of horses 
that would make Bonner take their dust. If Bonner's team is beaten, the 
owner must do as he does, drive it himself. Of the speed of his horses he is 
his own judge. He will buy anything that will beat the world. When a 
horse is presented to him for trial, he appears in full riding costume, with 
gloves, whip, and watch in hand. He does not allow the owner to handle the 
ribbons. 

Mr. Bonner's stables ai'e located on Twenty-seventh street. The build- 
ing is a plain brick one, Avith everything for conA'enience and comfort, and 
nothing for show. The front part contains the carriage-house, harness-room, 
wash-house, and the place Avhere the feed is mixed. In the rear are the 
stables. Dexter and Peerless have box-stalls and are never tied. The other 
horses are in ordinary stalls. Three persons are employed constantly to take 
care of the horses. Within the enclosure, but outside the stable, is a track 
covered with tanbark, on which the horses are daily exercised, one hour in 
the morning and in the evening. The horses are fed four times a day, at six, 
nine, one, and nine at night. A small allowance of hay is given once a day. 
After eating they are muzzled, to prevent them from devouring the bedding, 
and they are kept muzzled all night. In the winter Mr. Bonnyr drives but 
one horse at a time, and usually the Auburn horse. Dexter and the other 
fleet horses are seldom used in the winter, but are reserved for fast trotting 
in the spring. Great care is taken of the feet of the horses. To this Mr. 
Bonner gives personal attention. He has mastered the subject as he has 
newspaper business. He has a theory of his own, which has proved eminently 
successful in the treatment of his own horses, and has enabled him to remove 
the lameness from the valuable horses of his neighbors and friends. The 
idea that the speed to which these horses are put is a damage to them is as 
fallacious as it is to assert that it hurts an eight-mile-an-hour horse to drive 
him at that speed. Some of these fast horses Mr. Bonner has owned many 
years. They are faster now than when he bought them Lantern is ninet-en 
years old, and is as sound and fleet as when he was ten. The men who have 
charge of these horses are as careful and tender of them as is a tender nurse 
of a child. In the stable there is every convenience imaginable that a horse 
can require — tools for fitting shoes, grooming the animals, making the wagons 
safe, with medicines, and all the appliances of a first-class stable. The horses 
are said to have cost Mr. Bonner over two hundred thousand dollars. They 
could not be bought for double that sum. 

There is a frank, heai'ty manliness about Mr. Bonner which binds his 
friends to him. The eminent men who have written for his paper form attach- 
ments to him that death only severs. Mr. Everett conceived a warm and 



22 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

glowing regard tor him tliat was foreign to his cold nature. His manuscript 
oration on Washington, elegantly bound, he sent as a token of his personal 
regard to the editor of the Ledger. Mr. Bonner's office is a curiosity. It is 
a workshop, plainly furnished. His table is loaded down with letters, manu- 
scripts, and documents. What is confusion to others is order to him. The 
system with which he conducts his business is perfect. Any letter that he 
■wants, or any number of the Ledger containing a given article, is produced at 
once. No man attends more closely to his business, or spends more hours 
in his office. Nothing goes into tlie L^edger without his supervision ; and the 
sharp, crisp editorials, always compact, and often keen as a two-edged sword, 
are from his own pen. His office is adorned with likenesses of his prominent 
contributors and his celebrated horses. Horseshoes and the paraphernalia of 
fast driving lie around. He has made the horse his study for years, and has 
a better knowledge of a horse's foot than any surgeon in the world. Mr. 
Bonner is in the prime of life. He is short, thick-set, and compactly built. 
His hair is sandy, his com])lexion florid, his forehead high and intellectual, 
his eye piercing, and his whole manner frank, genial, and buoyant. He does 
nothing for show. He lives comfortably, but without ostentation, in a plain 
brick house. His country seat, at Morrisania, is elegant and commodious, 
about which there is no tinsel nor dash. He is a fine specimen of what good 
principles, excellent physical culture, perseverance, and industry can do for a 
man. The position he now occupies he looked to when he was a printer's 
lad in the office of the old Courant. He attempted no eccentric things, sought 
for no short cross-paths to success. He mastered his trade as a printer 
patiently and perfectly. He earned every position before he assumed it, and 
earned his money before he spent it. In New York he was preferred be- 
cause he did his Avork better than others. He was truthful, sober, honest, 
and industrious. If he took a job, he finished it at the time and in the man- 
ner agreed upon. He borrowed no money, incurred no debts, and suffered 
no embarrassments. In some of his great enterprises he put irp every dollar 
that he had in the world. If he lost, he alone would suffer; and he knew he 
could go to work and earn his living. He has never allowed the L^edger to be 
so dependent on one man, or on one set of men, that it could not go on suc- 
cessfully if each should leave. The T^edger is now the most prominent and 
po))ular publication in the world. It is without a rival in the ability with 
which it is conducted, and in its circulation. To the list of old writers new 
and attractive names are daily added. Mr. Bonner's great wealth, which he 
has honestly and fairly earned, enables him to command any attractive feature 
for his paper that he may select. Mr. Bonner is one of the most remarkable 
men of the age — the architect of his own fortune, a ))rompt, straightforward, 
and honest business man, with energy to push lli.it business to success. A 
perfect master of his (lalling, and successful in evei ythiiig he has undertaken, 
he is a worthv model for tin' younu- men of" .\nierica. 



JOHN F. HENRY. 



The poet has sung of Vermont as "the land of the mountam and the 
^•ock " but we begin to think that they raise smart business men there as M^ell 
•as "'horses ^nd pretty women," which, you remember, Saxe claims are the 
staple products. The Vermont boys, as soon as they can get away from 
home, leave for other parts of the world. As Daniel Webster said of New 
Hampshire, it is a good State to be born in, but we should emigrate as soon 
iis possible. If fortunes must be made and the inner wants of man supplied 
why not go out into the world where business is done on a large scale, and 
where pudding-stone can be found in the unpetrified condition ? All over the 
United States prominent men can be found who were born and cradled 
amono- the Green Mountains. New York city has its share of them, among 
whom" are FLsk & Hatch, the celebrated bankers on Nassau street, who have 
made fortunes by advertising liberally; Dr. Shedd, the eminent theologian ; 
Attorney-General Evarts, Hon. L. E. Chittenden, Hon. Levi Underwood, the 
Benedicts, Mr. Eaton, Mr. J. F. Henry, one of the largest druggists in the 
city, and many more we might name. 

Henry's medicine house is said to be the largest in the world, and as the 
laro-est "medicine man" we think him worthy a portion of our attention. 
He'is still quite a young man, being only thirty-five years of age, havmg been 
born in 1834 in the town of Waterbury, Vermont. He is the son ol the late 
Hon James M. Henry, of Waterbury, and brother of General Wm. W. 
Henry of Burlington, Vermont. His grandfather, Hon. Sylvester Henry, 
came from Amherst, Mass. Until about seventeen years of age Mr. Henry 
attended school in his native town, graduating from the well-known Bakers- 
field Academy. After leaving the Academy he commenced to travel m 
this State as a collector of bills for various business houses in this city. 
Amono- the gentlemen for whom he collected bills was the Hon. Smclair 
Tousey, now so well and favorably known to all our citizens. When twenty- 

•' ' , . , . 1 1 : „„^^^ -^-.^^i/Tir /-.+" Ilia 



one years of age he gave up this business, and, borrowing some money ol his 
father, opened a drug-store in Waterbury, Vermont. Here he worked hard 
for four years, combining energy with integrity, those sure procurers of ulti- 



mate success, earning in the end enough to repay his father, leaving a balance 
on hand of some eight thousand dollars. In 1860 he opened a drug-store m 
Montreal, and advertised it extensively all over Canada. The old files of 
the Toronto Globe, Herald, and other papers show that he was the largest ad- 
^vertiser in Canada. Business increased in proportion as he advertised, and 



24 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

soon he was doing the largest drug business in the provinces. This house 
was located at Nos. 513 and 515 St. Paul street, Montreal. By advertising 
largely in Vermont, the business of the Waterbury house increased to forty 
thousand dollars a year. With the two drug houses in successful operation, 
he continued to do a large and paying business, until about thrqe years 
ago ho became n )iartiu'r in the house of Demas Barnes & Co., of 21 Park 
Row. Here, by industry and energy, he soon rose to a prominent position in 
the house, and in October, 1868, when Mr. Barnes was ready to retire from the 
business, Mr. Henry was prepared to take it from his hands. He resigned 
his jtartnership in his other drug houses and devote*! his whole attention 
to the New York business. 

Mr. Henry is a man in the full vigoi- of life, of great urbanity and high 
moral character. He is tall, rather slim, has brown hair and hazel eyes, and 
wears light-colored beard and whiskers. He is an easy, pleasant talker, and 
has the happy faculty of making all with whom he comes in contact feel at 
their ease. This of itself has much to do with his business success. Mr. 
Henry resides on Second Place, in Brooklyn, a street which seems to be a 
favorite resort with medit^ine men, for here can be found the elegant resi- 
dences of the Curtis brothers, famous for their Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 
Syrup, and here, not long since at least, resided Mr. Barnes. Mr. Henry's 
annual sales of medicines now amount to over two million dollars. 

It is interesting to notice the vast numbers of boxes, all tilk'(l with the 
difterent compounds which the American people have to swallow in the hope 
of repairing health. There is gargling oil enough for a human throat as large 
as the Mississippi river; then there is magic oil, sewing-machine oil, and in 
strange contrast with it we have Saratoga "A" Spring Water, ]\Iissisquoi 
Water, whi(;h is sent to this city by the car-load ; J^ ad way's Heady Relief, 
Congress and Empire Water, Barrett's articles, Thompson's Eye Water, Ja- 
maica Ginger, Vermont Spring Water from Sheldon, Vt., Sanford's Liver Tn- 
vigorator, and hundreds of other medicines. In 1867 there were sold fifteen 
hundred and si.xteen gross of IlalFs Hair Restorative from this house alone; 
one hundred thousand dollars' Avorth of Saratoga Water was disposed of, and 
other things in like proportion. About fifty thousand gross of corks are used 
each year, and twenty thousand sheepskins are used for the manufacture ot 
Poor Man's Plasters. It seems as though this jtoor man must have a fearful 
back-ache. Large (piantities of Ilouchin's goods are sold here, and we see 
heaps of Phalon's perfumes as well as those of Jerry Baker. 

One job-otfice in the city is employed nearly all the time in doiuLrtho print- 
ing for this establishment. Advertising is the lite of the liusiness, and without 
it Mr. Henry would not be able to do a Icntli ]>:w\ of tlic Imsiness which he 
now does. He keeps his name before the |itililic, and as a result sends his 
goods to Smyrna, Spain, South America. !ii<lia. aii<l China. As the result ol 
advertising, a little inci<leiit in cdimectiim with this house recently came 
under our personal observation. The simple sign of " Saratoga 'A' Spring 
Water," printetl actross the w indows of this house, attracted the attention ot 
a gentleman from South Anieiic.a. who happened to l)e jiassincr aloncr the 
walk. He entered, and the result was (hat in the end he purchased six Imn 
dred cases of the water. 



GEORGE STECK & CO. 



This piano doubtless originated in Germany, the first known description 
of an instrument of this kind having been published there in 1511. It was 
called a clavichordium. Nearly all the improvements made in it from that 
period till the close of the last century were invented in Germany, the most 
celebrated of all the numerous inventors during that period having been 
Christian Gottlieb Schroeder, born in Saxony in 1699, and who died in 1784, 
and Henry Pape of Wiirtemburg. 

American patronage of music led to the commencement of the manufac- 
ture of pianos in this country about fifty years ago ; but until about 
twenty years ago Europe kept the superiority in this line of manufactures, 
largely exporting to the United States the renowned pianos of London, Paris, 
Vienna, Prague, Dresden, Leipsic, Berlin, Cassel, Stuttgart, Frankfort, etc. 

Since 1852 America has exhibited improvements upon European pianos, 
largely owing to the immigration of skilled pianomakers from Europe ; a 
zealous competition between the numerous rivals ; the superiority of Ameri- 
can woods, owing to their ability to resist changes of temperature in the 
atmosphere ; and, above all, to the genius evolved by the liberal prices here 
paid for the instruments which combined the best qualities required in a piano. 
European wood is more liable than American to shrink and crack in a warm 
atmosphere, and to expand in a moist one, thus changing the tone of the piano, 
and rendering equal tuning of the strings impossible. 

Owing to the rapid progress of the art in this country, New York has 
become the chief mart for pianos for the great capitals of the Avorld. Statis- 
tics prove this ; and European makers admit that they are compelled to copy 
the scales and inventions of American manufacturers. Better prices are here 
paid for the best pianos. This enables the manufacturers to employ better 
materials, and the most skillful mechanics. 

Among these manufacturers Mr. George Steck has been one of the most 
prolific and successful in the invention of important improvements in piano- 
making; so that the grand, square, square-grand, and upright piano-fortes of 
George Steck & Co. now stand, according to many, at the head of all com- 
petitors, for combining in perfection all the qualities required for a first-class 
piano, viz. : a rich, singing, sympathetic quality of tone, immense volume of 
sound, complete evenness throughout the scale, facility of action, and un- 



26 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

<?(iuale(l (lui-al)ility, iiiiU'jtciKkMit of unsurpassed fidelity of workmanship iu 
all the details of interior median ism, and an excellence of materials not ex- 
ceeded ill the world. 

The establishment was founded in Elm street, in this city, by Mr. Steck, 
about the year 18o7-58, the firm name being Steck & Grupe. It was subse- 
quently removed to the corner of Walker and Centre streets. In 1860 the 
firm style was changed to George Steck & Co. Owing to the celebrity attained 
by the improvements he introduced, larger accommodations were required; 
and the factory, now situated in Thirty-fourth street, and on Tenth and 
Eleventh avenues, comprises seven floors, two fronts of the building being 
each seventy-five feet long, and one sixty feet long. From ninety to one hun- 
dred experienced workmen are employed, the amount of raw material annually 
used costing from eighty to ninety thousand dollars, and the number of pianos 
now reaching to five hundred annually, ranging in price from five hundred to 
fifteen hundred each, according to style and finish ; the woods embrace walnut, 
rose, mahogany, maple, cherry, pine, oak, spruce, and ash, the chief portion of 
•which is thoroughly seasoned for from four to five years before being brought 
into use. The pianos are now sent throughout the United States, to Canada, 
Mexico, and South America. Mr. Steck has had a practical experience in this 
business from boyhood, embracing a period of about forty years. Each fore- 
man of the several departments in the factory has been attached to the estab- 
lishment ever since its commencement, a fact which is of itself a compliment 
to the concern. 

The high prestige won by the Steck pianos within so short a time, not- 
withstanding vigorous rivalry from long-established houses, causes a reference 
to some of the improvements which created it. For one of these inven- 
tions Mr. Steck received a patent in 1865. It consists of a plate of bell-metal, 
attached to that part of the piano where the agraffes or string-holders are 
fastened in. Bell-metal is composed of copper, tin, and brass, which metals 
are the best conductors of electricity. The electric power of the bell-metal 
imparts a more equal, sonorous, clear, bell-like, and vigorous tone to the piano 
than has been ever attained before, enabling it to act in accordance with the 
electricity in the atmosphere and in the human system, and having a most 
agreeable effect upon the nerves of the ear. Bell-metal is not subject to the 
changes which characterize steel, cast-iron, etc., of which other piano-bridges 
are made. These patent bell-metal plates or bridges are used in all of Steck 
<fe Co.'s instruments, and in no others. 

Another improved feature in the specialties of this house is its new and 
■original method of constructing the upright j)iano, or " l)oudoir." The Steck 
boudoir consists of three distinct parts — the case, the body, and the action, 
all of which are separately constructed, and will unite perfectly to form any 
one instrument. That is to say, the body and action will fit any case at will. 
There is an economy of manufacture in this idea which tells very satisfactorily 
■on the purchaser when the j)rice of the piano is named. Tliis is imj)ortant in 
point of economy. The boudoir has the added merit of being the most 
compact and graceful of pianos, Ix'sides costing less than any other style of 
first-class j)iano. Its new mode of construction doubles the power formerly 
obtained in uprights, w hicli, in this ingenious new form, must now soon be 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 37 

restored to more than their former popuLarity, and become powerful rivals to 

iill square pianos. t. , i ^ , 

A philosophical and impartial music critic (Mr. Edward Pelz) defines the 
rare qualifications necessary to be possessed by the manufacturer of a perfect 
piano, and attributes them in a high degree to Mr. George Steck : A sharp, 
acute, musical, and well-cultivated ear ; distinguished skill in all the varied 
manipulations ; accomplished workmanship ; exact knowledge of acoustics ; 
mechanical talent connected with power of invention ; profound experience 
in the -materials used ; plentiful patience and perseverance in the examination 
of every hammer and tone. He must also have constant and indefatigable 
oversight and control of all assistant workmen, for the eye of the master must 
continually watch over the selection of the necessary materials and every 
detail, as the slightest defect in either may prevent the desired result. In- 
clination for improvement must also at all times inspire him, no matter how 
great the success he has already attained. The persistent application of all 
these attributes to the production of pianos has distinguished Mr. Steck, as 
is shown by the names of many celebrated artists. 

Thousands of the Steck pianos are now in approved use throughout our 
own and other countries, and in every instance where fair competition with 
other instruments could be obtained they have won the prize. They have 
taken three First Premiums at various Fairs in Pennsylvania; and at the 
great National Exhibition of the American Institute in New York, in 1865, 
where a great number competed for the prizes, and after an unusually 
carefully and minute examination was made, the judges awarded them two 
prizes, a gold medal for the best Square Piano. 

It may be asked by the uninitiated, in view of this irresistible mass of 
evidence in favor of the Steck Pianos, why they were not exhibited at the 
Great Paris Exposition of 1867. The following facts will enlighten them on 
this point. 

United States Agency for the Paris Universal Exposition, ) 

February 18, 1867. S 
George Steck & Co., New York : Gentlemen: Yours of the 15th instant 
is received, and in answer to your inquiries I have to state that the only difli- 
culty in the way of placing your pianos is the lack of space. There is no 
doubt about their merits ; indeed, when such eminent critics as Judge Daly 
and Mr. Charles B. Seymour are so positive in their opinion as to the excel- 
lence of your instruments, it seems a pity that they should not go. 

J. C. Derby, United States Agency. 
Notwithstanding the above letter from the United States Commis- 
sioner, the truth was that there were nine places allotted for American 
pianos at the Paris Exposition, and these nine places were monopolized by 
two American firms. Messrs. George Steck & Co. were among the earliest 
applicants for a place ; a place had been allotted to them by the above-named 
Commissioner, as early as September, 1866; and they accordingly made the 
necessary preparations, at considerable expense. Yet five months alter a 
place had been assigned to them it was withheld, and the nine places were 
occupied by the favored two. In musical circles this transaction has been 
severely censured, and both the American and German press have indignantly 



28 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

condomnod the proceeding. This exclusion, however, has in one respect 
operated favorably for Steck & Co., for the discussion it has created has 
largely increased public attention to the excellence of the rejected applicant, 
who has successfully appealed from Paris to the world, and has, by adver- 
tising, illustrated the merits of his instruments very largely. 

From small beginnings, the genius and enterprise of the house lias won 
for it the highest rank. The uniformity of excellence which particularly dis- 
tinguishes all the Steck pianos is due, not only to the known integrity of the 
firm, but especially to the fact that no instrument ever issued from the*estab- 
ment without having undergone a thoroxigh inspection and sanction from the 
senior partner in person. 

We may add, in conclusion, that adjoining the warerooms is an elegant 
hall, forty by sixty feet in dimensions, the ceiling of which was superbly fres- 
coed at a cost of over two thousand dollars. The hall will comfortably seat 
from three hundred and fifty to four hundred persons. It is used for classical 
concerts, and lectures in German, French, and English, and is a favorite re- 
port of the educated and refined. 



OxcE in a while we find a man who a])i)reciate8 the benefits of adver- 
tising. Such an one recently gave a twenty-five thousand dollar printing 
press to the London Telegraph, accompanied by a letter saying: " In your 
paper, by judicious advertising, I have amassed the fortune which enables 
me to offer this testimony of regard and good will." "This," says the Phil- 
adelphia Bulletin, " is not an unusual cii-cumstance. At least the making of 
fortune by 'judicious advertising' is not unusual, although the giving of 
twenty-five thousand dollar acknowledgments therefor is confessedly not so 
common. There are very many colossal fortunes that would not now be in 
the possession of their present holders, were it not for 'judicious advertising.* 
The lucky owners of these comfortable sums deserve to enjoy tliem for their 
exercise of enterprise, tact, energy, and nerve, and, so that they have paid 
their advertising bills fully and fairly, the printer has no further claims upon 
them. English newspaper publishers may look for such substantial recog- 
nitions of their merits as this that has just been accorded to the London 
Telegraph ; but American nevvsi)aper folks are perfectly willing that their 
advertisers shall make fortunes through the agency of their printed columns, 
provided they pr(jm])tly pay the regular charges for advertising." 



Among the live and progressive institutions of the day is G. P. Kowell 
& Co.'s Advertising Agency. Their establislnnent is so systematized and 
their facilities are so amjile that tlie public is sure of being served in the 
most complete manner. — Jiostoa Post, Dec. 1th, 186C. 



PETER LORILLARD. 



The house of the Lorillards on Chambers street has a history that would 
fill a goodly volume, and one of interest too. Here nearly one hundred and 
twenty years ago, on what was then the high road to Boston, Pierre Loril- 
lard, the founder of the house, built his snuff factory. The factory stood 
at the other end of the block — that bounded by Chatham street. Five or 
six acres surrounding the works were owned by the industrious Huguenot. 
After his death the works were carried on by his widow, after her decease 
by Peter and George conjointly, and after these by Peter, son of Peter, who 
died three years ago worth twenty million dollars. The present head of the 
house is another Peter, son of him last named, a man of sterling character, 
as zealous in the pursuit of trade as any of his predecessors. He has three 
brothers, Jacob, George, and Louis, the former of whom is the only one of 
the three engaged in business. Mr. Peter Lorillard is assisted in the conduct 
of his enormous trade by Mr. Charles Siedler, the junior partner, educated 
in the house, and who has achieved his present position during twenty years' 
consecutive labors for the welfare of the firm. Mr. Siedler is but thirty-four 
years old or thereabouts, yet works the great machine as if he had handled 
it for a century. He is the chief buyer of leaf for the house and general 
superintendent of the manufacture and the sales. Mr. Lorillard attends 
chiefly to the finances which, as after figures will show, embrace more dol- 
lars than did those of half a dozen German principalities before the con- 
federation. 

The present store in Chambers street is built, as we have said, on a por- 
tion of those five acres once flanked by the high road to Boston. This 
was raised in 1859, and was then assumed to be large enough to meet all 
future requirements of the house down town. It is already much too small. 
In the basement the packing of the fine qualities of snuflf is carried on and the 
labeling and the afiixing of the revenue stamps. On the first floor are the 
oflices and shipping rooms. On the second floor are other packing and 
stamping rooms. On the third, as busy as bees in honey time, there are sev- 
eral rooms full of girls engaged in wrapping the chewing tobacco in its neat 
covering of tin foil, and men who pack the tobacco therein by an ingenious 
process, which would be interesting to describe had we but room for the 
details. On this floor, also, some twenty sewing-machines or thereabouts are 



80 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

rattling like a hailstorm, tashioning, guideil l»y nimble fingers, the bags 
Mhich are to contain the score of varieties of smoking tobacco. Ten thousand 
little pouches are here made per day, to contain each from one-eighth to a 
pound of the odorous weed, and using up no less than from one to three 
thousand yards of muslin and linen. On the fourth floor these bags are 
filled and stamped and labeled. 

Upon each barrel, box, bag, and package which leaves the place the 
government stamp has to be aftixed, and this is in great part done in a room 
expressly devoted to the object, and by the most trustworthy servants. 

In addition to the store described, and two factories, the establishment 
embraces three large bonded warehouses in the city, four in Brooklyn, and 
four in Jersey City. It has leaf-purchasing houses in Cincinnati, Louisville, 
in Virginia and Xorth Carolina, and agencies in almost every important city 
in the Union. In another year it will have added to these a new factory up 
town, to embrace an entire block. It employs in all about seven hundred 
hands, to whom it pays in wages about three hundred and twenty-five 
thousand dollars per annum. The gross sales of the house for the year 1868 
reached between four and five million dollars. Four to six thousand hogs- 
heads of leaf are at all times on hand, either in store or in process of manu- 
facture, each of these weighing from one to two thousand pounds. The 
city sales amount to about seven hundred thousand dollars per annum. The 
gross sales in pounds for 1868 were of fine cut tobacco, one million two hun- 
dred and thirty-six thousand five hundred and ninetv-five dollars; of smoking^ 
one million dollars; of snuff, one million dollars also. Last year the assump- 
tion was that they would be fifty per cent, higher in each description. In 
1866, 1867, and 1868, the house of Lorillard paid to the government three 
million five hundred thousand dollars in direct taxes on their own manu- 
facture. 

A few years ago this firm commenced advertising, through the medium of 
the public press, a new brand of chewing tobacco, called Century. In this 
brand there was money placed in given proportions, the whole was hand- 
somely advertised, and there was an immense sale. Peo})le bought tobacco 
just for the sake of getting the money, and their attention was so frequently 
called to it by the newspaper press that no one was likely to forget it. 
When, after a reasonable time spent in this way, the sales had become so 
large that its introduction was assured, the money was discontinued, and the 
proprietors had a pleasant remin(U'i- of their success in the money they had 
made. 

That the present head of this gigantic and centenarian trade, and great- 
grandson of the brave old Huguenot, Pierre Lorillard, is fast accumulating 
a princely fortune is evident. It has been whispered to us, too, that he has 
glorious schemes for the expenditure of many millions of it, such as have 
made the name of Peabody reveriMl in the homes of llu' .\nglo-Saxon people 
everywhere. 



DR. DAVID JAYNE. 



It may witli confidence be asserted that no inventor of patent medicines 
on this side of the Atlantic exceeded the late Dr. Jayne in the amount of 
money expended in making the virtues of his nostrums known, or in the 
profits realized from the sale of them. Unlike Dr. Schenck, he was educated 
to the healing art, and was a practicing physician in New Jersey before he 
removed to Philadelphia. Of course as soon as he embarked in his new 
business he could no longer be considered within the charmed circle, as the 
regular faculty refuse to acknowledge any one who deals in what are known 
as secret curatives. But so long as he could cure sufiering humanity, filling 
his pockets meanwhile, he could well afibrd to bear the frown of his former 
associates. It is more than thirty years since he commenced his business 
career, beginning in a very small way, for his means were limited, but he had 
the good sense to see that no matter how much merit his medicines possessed 
it was necessary to make them know^n. In the matter of advertising, Dr. 
Jayne led all competitors in the race for fame and fortune, and he expended 
probably as mitch money in that way at first as he realized out of the sale of 
his compounds. Scarcely a newspaper could be found in town or country in 
which his medicines were not recommended and their virtues extolled. The 
foundation of Dr. Jayne's success and fortune was laid while he was on Third 
street near Market, and he could then have retired upon ample means had he 
been content to do so. About the year 1850, he began to look about for a 
new location, and he soon became the possessor of a valuable property on 
Chestnut street, below Third, which he commissioned his friend Hoxie, the 
well-known builder, to improve. This was done at an immense cost, a granite 
structure being erected which in height and general appearance was calcu- 
lated, as it was designed, to attract pul)lic notice, the name of the owner being 
chiseled conspicuously upon the facade. To this seven-storied granite struc- 
ture the great medicine man removed about the year 1851. He had then got 
too far up the ladder to feel fear of any business mishaps, yet he continued to 
advertise as liberally as before he was so well known, being satisfied, as he 
often said, that newspapers have new readers every day, and there were con- 
tinually new patients to be physicked as well as old ones. At this time the 
doctor's income had become so large that he could not well manage it in his 
business, and he was not the man to let money rust for want of use. He pur- 



33 THE MEN WPIO ADVERTISE. 

chased a property on Dock street and erected a large granite structure upon 
the site, Avhich, being immediately on a line with the Chestnut street store, 
was used, in connection with the upper portion of the other, for a Mechanics' 
Institute exhibition, a bridge being thrown across an intermediate street to 
connect the two. In 1856, the doctor erected a large granite-fronted building 
on Chestnut street, below Seventh, designed for public meetings, lectures, 
concerts, balls, etc., which was called " Jayne's Hall' At a later period he 
caused to be put up a marble-fronted block of stores on the site of the 
Arcade, called " Jayne's Marble Stores," and about the same time altered a 
building in the same neighborhood for an insurance office — a concern ot 
which he was the Alpha and Omega. This was not the only speculation that 
the doctor engaged in which did not pay. After an experiment of a few 
years he gave the insurance business up, and closed the place. The doctor 
did not trouble himself further with speculations in real estate until he con- 
ceived the idea of building himself a palace in the " West End," among the 
nabobs of the town. Up to this time he seemed to be content with a plain 
yet handsome residence on Third street, above Spruce. There M'ith his young 
wife he appeared to be enjoying himself, but he was not entirely happy, as 
his aspirations for a larger, handsomer, and more attractive residence abun- 
dantly show. He purchased a large lot of groimd at Chestnut and Nine- 
teenth streets, and commis.sioned John McArthur, the architect, to prepare 
plans for the erection of a marble-fronted building, to adorn and beautify 
which no expense was to be spared. As an evidence of his liberality and taste, 
he directed the " counterfeit presentment" of his daughters to be chiseled 
upon the ornamental part of the parlor mantels; the doors to be made of 
solid walnut, the knobs and fastenings to be plated with silver, the window 
glass to be of the best French manufacture ; in short, everything to be first- 
class. And he could well afford to be liberal. His fortune was counted by 
millions, and his income itself was so large that he had to conjure up ways 
and means to dispose of it. When the place was nearly ready for occupancy, 
when he had seen it through all the stages of its erection, from the laying of 
the foundations to the frescoing of the walls, and was anticipating, no doubt, 
many happy days in it, that terrible old apparition, with scythe and hour- 
glass, came along and laid his icy fingers upon him. In vain the doctor strug- 
gled, and in vain he invoked the aid of the best medical talent. The time 
had come for him to leave his earthly possessions and seek those of a sub- 
limcr and holier kind. Finding his last hour to be come, he yielded as grace- 
fully as possible, and died in the belief of a blessed immortality. Dr. Jayne's 
record was good from first to last, and there was but one calumny he had to 
encounter. He was charged with an attempt to buy his way into the Senate 
of the United States. That he did really desire to go there, and was willing 
to expend money liberally to reach that elevated position, was not doubted, but 
it was not to be used in l)ribing members of the Legislature. The doctor had 
no such thought, and he came out of the contest unharmetl. In some respects 
Dr. Jayne was. a wonderful man. He had energy and force of character in 
an eminent degree; and his faith was never for a moment shaken in the effi- 
cacy and certain return of newsi)apor ailvcrtising. Peace to his ashes. 



J)EVLIN & CO. 



The manufacture and sale of ready-made clothing constitutes a branch of 
trade which is everywhere strictly dependent upon the progress of wealth 
and refinement. Next to shelter and siibsistence, the principal want of man- 
kind is for clothing adapted to the circumstances of climate, season, national 
habits, or individual taste and caprice. The temperate latitudes and the most 
refined nations with accumulated wealth give the largest scope and the amplest 
rewards to the clothier and the customer. The rich and highly-privileged 
nations who chiefly occupy the temperate zone, by reason of the regular suc- 
cession of seasons, the gradations of society, the general difiusion of wealth, 
the multiplicity of arts and occupations, and the personal freedom allowed, 
encourage a corresponding diversity of costume to meet the varied wants and 
tastes of each individual under the changing whims of fortune and fasliion. 
Hence we find a large proportion of the productive industry of civilized 
nations devoted to the growth and manufacture of the various fabrics used 
for clothing and of the implements and the machinery subservient thereto. 

A very great part of the internal and foreign trade of the most commer- 
cial States consists in the exchange and distribution of materials for clothing, 
in the raw or manufactured state. Needle-women, by whom, under the 
modern system of wholesale manufacturers of clothing, the chief part of the 
work has been pei'formed, have sometimes found prices inadequate for a com- 
fortable support. The comparatively recent introduction of the sewing- 
machine has reduced the number of sewing- women ; yet their sudden dis- 
placement has not on the whole damaged their interests as a class. The revo- 
lution in the tailoring business which has created the ready-made clothing 
trade, as a distinct branch of industry, began about thirty-five years ago. At 
that time a few establishments in New York and other principal cities were 
engaged in shipping clothing to the Southern States and foreign ports. Before 
that time ready-made clothing consisted principally of slop-work for seamen, 
some of it being imported. The domestic market has been the main depend- 
ence of the wholesale clothing trade. The business has now become widely 
distributed throughout the country. Its extension has wrought an important 
change in the dry-goods trade. The importation and sale of foreign and do- 
mestic cloths has passed, in a measure, into the hands of Avholesale clothing 



34 'niE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

merchants who unite the jobbing business with that of manufacturers and 
dealers in clothing on a large scale. So extensive have some of these become 
that several thousand persons have been employed by a single establishment. 
The male hands are mostly Irish and German immigrants, the cutters being 
principally American. The wages have been almost uniformly greater than 
the same class would earn in Europe. The females have generally been better 
paid than needlewomen in European cities. The sewing-machine has been of 
late years extensively employed, and has given a vast impetus to the trade. 
It has cheapened the cost of production and enabled the manufacturer to turn 
out his work with greater rapidity, and thus to accommodate his stocks to the 
current state of the market. And as many sewing-women themselves possess 
these machines, they are enabled to counterbalance any reduction in the price 
of work by its increased amount. These machines have contributed to make 
the large wholesale clothing houses of our chief cities the palatial establish- 
ments they have now become, rivaling in extent and completeness those of 
any other branch of trade. 

One of the most extensive and respectable houses in the clothing trade 
is that of Devlin & Co., who have two large warehouses in Broadway, and 
branch houses in Washington, Richmond, and Lexington, Ky. This estab- 
lishment was originated in 1844, at the corner of Nassau and John streets, in 
this city, under the firm style of D. & J. Devlin. After a notably successful 
career of eighteen years at that location, the firm moved to the south-west 
corner of Broadway and Warren streets, in 1854, and in 1861 they added the 
large and elegant warehouse at the corner of Broadway and Grand street, as 
the headquarters of their wholesale trade, the store at the corner of Broad- 
way and Warren street being devoted to the retail business exclusively. 
Since 1863 the firm style has been as at present, Devlin & Co., the members 
being Jeremiah Devlin, Jonathan Ogden, Stephen W. Jessup, and Robert C. 
Ogden. These gentlemen have i.11 had the advantage of a life-time experi- 
ence in the business, having devoted their exclusive attention to it continually 
from boyhood. The founder of this firm died a few years ago, leaving a 
colossal fortune, and his brother is now the representative of the family. This 
latter gentleman is now on a trip to Europe, having recently taken a wife, 
and being in the possession of such circumstances as would enable him to be 
spared from the cares of business for a while. 

The five warehouses conducted by Devlin & Co. represent an amount of 
trade equaled by few wholesale clothing manufacturers, and a class of clotli- 
ing, custom-made and ready-made, which long ago acquired an enyiable 
reputation for the firm. The number of employees engaged by them, in and 
out of the five establishments, averages about two thousand, including about 
thirty cutters, all of whom are admitted by the profession to be accomplished 
artists in their respective lines; and to their skill the celebrity of the goods 
emanating from this house is largely to be attributed. 

The clothing comprises all grades and prices of garments, ready-made 
and made to special order, and the city trade of the house is probably unsur- 
passed in extent by any other similar house in New York. In fact the whole 
stock is manufactured expressly to meet the requirements of the best retail 
trade, and embraces the latest fabrics of the foreign and domestic markets. 



THE ]\[EN WHO ADVEimSE. 35 

The foreign goods of the house are imported fi-oiu Great l>rilaiu. i^'rauce, and 
Rhenish Prussia, and comprise the latest novelties and general staple and 
fancy styles of London and Paris. The domestic goods of the firm are prin- 
cipally fancy cassimeres, these fabrics being now made of very superior excel- 
lence in this country, as has been emphatically exemplified by the display of 
such goods at the recent Fair of the American Institute. 

Ever since the foundation of the firm there has been a large amount of 
advertising done by them, and their notices have been distinguished by a 
freshness and originality which other houses have copied. Twenty, twenty- 
five, and thirty thousand dollars have been expended in a single year by them 
with favorable results. They think it pays. 

The trade of the firm extends throughout the United States and the 
West Indies, a material part of it being in fulfillment of heavy contracts for 
the army and navy. Superiority of style and workmanship has always dis- 
tinguished this establishment, and eminently justifies the high name and vast 
trade it has enjoyed in the city and country, through many years of uninter- 
rupted prosperity. It is truly a representative house in this line of l)usiness, 
and its large capital, long experience, and unusually great facilities enable it 
to supply its patrons with the best goods at the lowest figure of profit. 



The New York Mail^ in an interesting article on advertising, mentions 
the fact that the advertising firm of Geo. P. Rowell & Co., of New York, 
had expended six thousand dollars in six days in advertising their own 
agency. They rej^ort the investment most valuable and successful. We can 
endorse most cheerfully the following from the Mail: "We can say most 
emphatically, and all agents and publishers will agree with us, that there 
is no more enterprising, faithful, and satisfactory house to deal with. They 
never let a bill be presented twice, and pay daily all accoimts received by 
mail. They have the monopoly of space and location in many hundred 
newspapers, and know, by their experience, just where to invest money 
to the best advantage." — Berkshire Courier. 



Advertisi^^g. — We have for many years studied the art of advertising, 
and still it remains to us a marvel that there is not one hundred times more 
of it. We never yet knew a man to advertise his wares liberally and 
steadily that it did not pay. Yet there are thousands of manufacturers and 
tens of thousands of men having articles which they declare ought to be 
" in every household in the country," who advertise as gingerly and closely 
as though they had at heart no faith in it at all. How can they expect to 
get their goods everywhere unless some knowledge of the articles gets into 
the family first through the family paper ? If we waited till people learned 
from their neighbors, we might wait for years before the most wonderful 
and useful inventions became known. — For)iey''s Press. 



JOSHUA \l. JONES. 



It is a common habit with the mass of people to attribute success in 
business to "luck" or "fortune." Few, except those who have passed over 
the same road, know how false is the assertion that men rise in their callings 
by mei*e accident. Whether wealth comes rapidly or slowly in legitimate 
business, it must be won by hard labor. There is no royal road to fortune. 
Each step of the way must be carefully and deliberately selected, and firmly 
and patiently trodden, and all the courage, skill, and fortitude with which one 
is endowed must be exercised to the very fullest extent. To win fortune one 
must work for it. 

Joshua R. Jones Avas born near the village of Fawn C4rove, in York 
County, Pennsylvania, on the 23d of August, 1837. His father was a farmer, 
and was honored m his community as an energetic, honest. God-fearing man. 
Young Joshua remained at home until his eighteenth year, working on the 
farm and attending the country school. He was impressed at an early day by 
his parents with those qualities of industry, energy, and self-reliance which 
have distinguished his manhood, and to these early lessons much of his suc- 
cess may be attributed. He spent one year at a boarding-school in Loudon 
County, Virginia, completed his studies at the Pennsylvania Normal School, 
at Millersville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and taught one year in a 
public school near his home in York County. 

While spending the summer at home, after his return from the Normal 
School, he met with a man from Massachusetts who was canvassing his 
neighborhood for subscribers to a popular work, then being published in New 
England. He was at that time endeavoring to decide upon some means of 
earning his living more consistent with his energetic nature than the quiet, 
humdrum life of a teacher; and this new method of selling books at once 
attracted his attention. The j\fassachusetts agent was an active, enterprising 
man himself, and was so well pleased with the interest young Jones mani- 
fested in his business that he explaine<l the whole system to him, and advised 
him to make the experiment of canvassing. Mr. Jones decided to <lo so, and 
upon making application to the New England publishing tirm was directed 
to canvass the County of Hartford, in the State of Maryland. 

The subscription book trade, which has now become so important a 
feature of the pul)lishing interest of this country, was then in its infancy, anil 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 87 

haH not attained tlie perfection of system of wliich it can boast to lay. Mr. 
Jones quickly detected the weak points of the system, and, after carefully 
studying the instructions sent him by his employers, determined to conduct 
his canvass upon a plan which had suggested itself to him since he deter- 
mined to engage in the business. He went into Maryland and canvassed 
Hartford county so thoroughly and successfully that he was instructed to 
go to work in York County, Pennsylvania. He Avas equally successfid in 
this new field, w'lere he displayed the same indomitable energy that had 
made his fath ;• declare he was during his boyhood " the best hand on the 
farm, and c uld do more work than all the rest." 

The canvass of these two counties occupied Mr. Jones about a year, and 
netted him a (considerable sum of money. After closing his affairs here, he 
went to the Western States, where he renewed his efforts. He was as suc- 
cessful as in the East. During his residence in the West he traveled exten- 
sively through that great section of the country, selling books, and learning 
by experience and by contact with them the actual wants of the people. 

Returning from the West, he opened a publishing house in Baltimore, in 
connection with his brother, Mr. J. T. Jones, the present manager of the 
branch house of the National Publishing Company in Cincinnati, Ohio ; but, 
finding that Philadelphia was a much more advantageous point from which 
to conduct the business, he removed to that city. Immediately upon arriv- 
ing there, it was proposed to organize a publishing company, with ample cap- 
ital, for sale of books by subscription. The plan was promptly carried out, 
and the National Publishing Company came into existence, with Mr. J. li. 
Jones at the head as their President. The members of the Company were 
men of experience, character, and capacity, but the management of affairs was 
left entirely in the hands of the President. 

No better choice could have been made. Endowed with moral courage 
of a high order, and with a calm, cool judgment, Mr. Jones was well qualified 
to conduct any new enterprise to a successful issue. But besides these gen- 
eral attributes he was especially fitted for his post by reason of his experience 
as an agent or canvasser. He had begun " at the bottom of the ladder," he 
had canvassed in person, and he knew the people amongst whom he had to 
operate. He knew their tastes, their wishes, their vagaries, and how to 
comply with the one and humor the other. He had commenced canvassing 
with the determination to become a publisher, and had labored faithfully to 
qualify himself for that post. 

In entering upon his new duties, Mr. Jones laid down a few plain and 
simple rules for his guidance. These were : To publish nothing but works 
of merit ; to conduct his business upon principles of the strictest promptness 
and integrity ; and to advertise liberally. By keeping his books constantly 
before the public he knew he could create a demand for them, and he was 
fully alive to the advantages of publishing nothing but standard works. 
His expectations have been fully realized. 

Soon after the organization of the National Publishing Company it was 
decided to open a branch house in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Mr. J. T. Jones, one 
of the Company, was placed in charge of it. The reason for this step was 
that the branch house could reach that immense field Avhich the growing 



38 TlfE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

West offers to greater advantage tlian tlie main house in Philadelphia. The 
experiment was successful, and was rejieated in other places. Jk'sides the main 
house in Philadelphia, the National Publishing Company now have branches 
in Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, and Atlanta, Ga. From these centres they 
8i)read their immense business over the whole country. Each l)ranch house 
is in the charge of an experienced manager, and each one is under the con- 
stant supervision of the President of the Company. The books are all 
issued by the main house and shipped to the branches. Each establishment 
has its territory carefully selected and assigned to it, and neither is allowed 
to operate in the States assigned to another. To-day the National Publish- 
ing Company constitute the wealthiest, most extensive, and most successful 
subscription book-publishers in the Union. 

We have stated that in commencing business Mr. Jones determined to 
a<lvertise liberally. One of the first books published by the Company over 
which he presides was "A History of the Rebellion,'' by Samuel Schmucker, 
LL. D. At the time this book was proposed to him, "The American Conflict," 
by Mr. Greeley, was at the height of its popularity, and it had come to be 
generally understood amongst "bookmen" that Greeley's history would drive 
any other out of the market. A careful examination of Schmucker's book 
satisfied Mr. Jones that it was a work of merit, and that it contained many 
elements of popularity. It was written by a comparatively unknown author, 
however, Avhile Mr. Greeley's book had all the advantage which his name 
could give it. Notwnthstanding this disadvantage Mr. Jones decided to un- 
dertake the publication of the new book. Arrangements were accordingly 
effected tor this purpose, the work was put to press, and issued at a price 
which placed it within the reach of the masses. A judicious system of ad- 
vertising was adopted, contracts were made with the press, and announce- 
ments of the book were inserted in every newspaper in the loyal States. 
Publishers laughed at the rash assurance of their daring rival, and told him 
he would lose all the money he spent on the newspapers ; but he persisted in 
his course, feeling confident that he knew the public better than the croakers. 
The result was a triumphant vindication of his foresight and courage. His 
liberal system of advertising created an enormous demand for the book, and 
an edition of sixty thousand copies (the work consisted of a single volume) 
was sold in the short space of six months. 

At first, ]\rr. Jones conducted his a<lvertising arrangements by dealing 
directly with the newspapers. This rccpiired a large expenditure of time and 
labor, and sometimes gave rise to expensive journeys. Hundreds of letters 
had to be written (biring the year, and special contiacts with each journal were 
necessary. When Messrs. G. P. Rowell & Co., of New York, laid the founda- 
tion of the extensive system of advertising which they have conducted so suc- 
cessfully, and which is so well known to the publico to-day, Mi-. Jones (|uickly 
discovered the advantage it would afford him in his business. He male t!ie 
experiment of advertising one of liis publications througli tliis agency, 
and carefully noted the results of" tiic new system as compared with 
his direct dealings with the journals. The result was very greatly in 
favor of the List System of this firm, and from this small venture, made 
witii such characteristic caution, the National Publishing (^omp'.iny have 



THE M5']N WHO ADVERTISE. 39 

continued year aftei- year to avail tliemselves of the list system, until their 
advertising bills with Messrs. G. P. Rowell & Co. alone now amount to over 
twenty thousand dollars per annum. They find their system the cheapest, 
most advantageous, and least troublesome in use. A single contract with 
them now accomplishes all for which hundreds of such agreements were 
formerly needed. 

Mr. Jones is a firm believer in the merits of judicious advertising. He has 
tested the subject thoroughly, and has advertised more extensively than any 
publisher in the United States. The success which has crowned his eftbrts 
has encouraged his competitors to follow his example, and it may be safely 
said that he has, by his energy, his courage, and the thorough and systematic 
manner in which he has conducted his business, created a complete revolu- 
tion in the book trade. 

The National Publishing Company have issued many valuable and in- 
teresting works, not one of which has ever failed. Books that would have 
been so much dead stock in the hands of other publishers have been sold by 
thousands by this Company. They rarely issue a work without selling from 
forty to fifty thousand copies. The reason of this is plain. The President 
knows exactly what book will sell, and after taking hold of it keeps it con- 
stantly before the public by means of his advertisements, and thus creates a 
steady demand for it. 

Mr. Jones is still a young man, being old in experience, not in years. He 
is of medium size, and is sparely made. His features are strongly marked, 
his complexion sallow, and his hair and beard black. His mouth has a pleasant 
but resolute expression, and his glance is quick and piercing. Every move- 
ment is full of energy, and he is never idle. He is extremely neat in his per- 
son, and dresses with care and taste. Socially he is very popular. He is firm 
in his friendships, and generous to his enemies. His charities are large, but 
unostentatious. He is fond of society, and has gathered around him a host 
of friends who are devoted to him. He is married, has a family, and resides 
in an elegant mansion in Arch street, Philadelphia. He owns considerable 
real estate in that city, besides other property, all of which he has earned in 
his business. He is very fortimate in his relations with the authors of his 
publications. He is extremely liberal with them, and never fails to win their 
cordial friendship and esteem. 

In his business relations he is a model for young men. The discipline of 
his establishment is rigid and exacting, but his clerks and employees are de- 
voted to him. They have been with him now f(5r years, and- would not leave 
him for any other place. The salaries are liberal and are never in arrears. 
The whole establishment is neat and orderly. Everything is in its place, and 
every detail is arranged with the utmost exactness. The eye of the Presi- 
dent is on everything. Not a letter comes or goes without his inspection, not 
a box is packed or shipped, not a nail driven, or a book wrapped Mdthout his 
knowledge. He attends to all the various details of buying paper, stereo- 
typing, illustrating, binding, and advertising, and never leaves his ofiice until 
the work for the day is done. He knows the whole business thoroughly, and 
can turn his hand to anything. Besides managing all these details of the 
main ofiice in Philadelphia, he exercises a careful supervision over the branch 



40 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

houses. lie knows all the operations of each and every one of them, and at 
regular times visits them in person. Hundreds of letters come to him every 
day asking for advice and instruction. They are promptly and satisfactorily 
answered, and his directions generally lead to success if followed faithfully. 
He has no idle moments. Besides directing the operations of five houses, he 
has to watch over the thousands of canvassers who are working for the Com- 
pany in all parts of the Union. He is never behindhand, however. He 
has made his own fortune and that of the Company over which he presides, 
and has won a name for integrity, business capacity, and energy which has 
made him a marked man in his callinn:. 



We believe there has never been an advertising contract given out in 
New York city for which the competition Avas greater than for the one which 
was awarded to Geo. P. Rowell & Co. in September, 1868, by P. H. Drake 
& Co. They had made application to the publishers direct in all cases. 
Their letter states the result : 

Office of P. H. Drake & Co., New York, Sept. 18, 1868. 
Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, New York : 

Gents : Having compared your figures Avith those furnished us by other 
advertising agencies and with the terms obtained from publishers direct, for 
the insertion of advertisements of Plantation Bitters and Magnolia Water, we 
find them satisfactory, and accept your contract as given in your letter of this 
date. Oblige us by causing the advertisements to appear without unnecessary 
delay. Your bills for the amount, forty-three thousand, seven hundred and 
S3venty-six dollars and twenty-six cents, will be paid in accordance with the 
terms proposed. Yours, very respectfully, 

P. H. DRAKE & CO. 



That was a profound philosopher Avho compared atlvertising to a grow- 
ing crop. He said: "The farmer plants his seed, and while he is sleeping 
the corn is growing. So Avith advertising. While you are sleeping or 
eating, your advertisement is l)eing read by thousands of persons Avho never 
saw you or heard of your btisiness, nor never would, had it not been for 
your advertising." 



HENliY T. HELMBOLD. 



Henry T. Helmbold was born in the city of Philadelphia, December, 1832, 
His parents being in moderate circumstances, he was anxious that he should 
commence " earning his living," and by unaided exertions he prepared him- 
self for the High School, where he finished his literary and classical studies, 
graduating with the highest honors at the age of nineteen. Subsequently he 
became enamored of the study of chemistry, and, after taking his degree, he 
pursued his private studies and elementary practice under the preceptorship 
of an old and competent physician and chemist. About this time he embarked 
in the drug business in a small way, and commenced the manufacture of his 
now celebrated Fluid Extracts. They had then but a limited sale, as 
it required considerable effort to bring them to the notice of physicians. At 
this time extracts were sold in bulk, as " paregoric," " syrup of squills," and 
other compounds. His business increased in this way, but the protection 
offered him was very slight. For instance, a druggist receiving a physician's 
prescription for his article would in many cases substitute that of his own 
manufacture, thereby causing difiiculty between the practitioner and himself 
Learning this, and seeing that his interests were becoming jeopardized, he 
concluded either not to sell to dealers in bulk, notify physicians of his deter- 
mination, and be satisfied to remain an obscure druggist in the upper part of 
a large city, or adopt some entirely different method. He was aware of the 
singular prejudices existing against advertised remedies, and in truth had but 
limited means at his command to experiment in " printers' ink." About this 
time he received an offer for his drug-store, and disposed of it. The nego- 
tiation was no sooner concluded than, with a few hundred dollars as his cash 
capital, he rented a small office on Chestnut street, Philadelphia, and was 
ready for business in a few. days. Advertising to him was a new and untried 
field, but with his small capital he determined to know its merits and value, 
for even at that early date he was no hand to loiter, so he concluded that he 
would satisfy himself in one mouth. He manufactured a small stock, and ex- 
pended all his surplus cash, amounting to about two thousand dollars, in that 
short period. His programme worked admirably, and from that time he 
continued to succeed, and increased his advertising in a corresponding pro- 
portion. On these principles he has continued to enlarge and expand his 
business until it has assumed its present magnitude. In the year 1863, his 
business having steadily increased, he determined to remove to " Gotham," 



43 TirE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

where he could Imve a larger field for his operations, still retaining his 
laboratory in Philadelphia. Here he installed himself in his drug and 
chemical warehouse, 594 Broadway, to which he has been making such 
additions and improvements from time to time as were actually necessary. 

Dn. Helmbold has been aptly designated the " Prince of Druggists." His 
store on Broadway is undoubtedly the finest of its kind on this continent. 
Everything that money could supply and good taste suggest has been used in 
the fitting up of his establishment, until 594 Broadway has become a place 
that courts and receives the admiration of the thousands of people Avho daily 
throng New York's grand thoroughfare. Some one has said it is the 
most Buchu-ful store in New York. Although yet but a young man, he 
has the present year been able to return an income of one hundred and fifty- 
two thousand two hundred and five dollars. There are innumerable drug- 
gists in this city, the majority perhaps doing a tolerable amount of business, 
but we only know of one who can keep twenty thousand dollars' worth of 
liorsefiesh to draw him up and down town, and a driver to make the animals 
dance in front of his store for the benefit of those who love to look upon 
lively horseflesh, gold trappings, and a " whip " that can brush a fly oflT the ear 
of a leader without disturbing a hair. 

Dr. Helmbold is peculiar in the permanency of his attachment to men of 
just and fair dealing. He would forgive a debt rather than distress a worthy 
man. Besides his thorough knowledge of diseases and remedies, he is a flne 
geologist, and well read in kindred sciences and general literature. His busi- 
ness habits are systematic, precise, and industrious. He personally superin- 
tends every department of his vast business, being afl'able, genial, and generous. 

In the advertising department four clerks are constantly engaged in ex- 
amining the columns of the thousands of journals through which Helmbold 
communicates with the world at large. Each clerk has his range of papers, 
and when the mails come in these are properly assorted and examined, and a 
record made of the service rendered by the printer on such and such a date. 
On one side of this room are the newspaper shelves, or " pigeon holes," all 
carefully labeled, and in these are kept for months or years, as the case may 
be, the ditterent journals with which Dr. Helmbold does business. 

As an advertiser Dr. Helmbold has no equal. The amount of money he 
expends every year in making his business known is extraordinary, almost in- 
credible, and the results of the advertising are remarkable. Take the one 
article of " Buchu." Who has not heard of "Buchu?" Why, this magic 
word adorns every dead wall, fence, rock, and telegraph pole from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific. Every newspaper of note in the States receives notices from Dr. 
Helmbold, and the rustics of "8<jueedunk" have an equal chancre with there- 
fined people of " Bosting " to learn of the wonderful properties of " Buchu." 
The result of this advertising, as stated previously, is truly remarkable. 
During the year ending February, 1S69, over three million bottles of Buchu 
were packed and sliijijied to vaiions portions of this continent, and the amount 
expended in adviTtising \\:is a little over two huiidr(Ml and fifty thousand dol- 
lars, exclusive of posters, ahnaiiacs, show-cards, etc. A one or a ten-thousand- 
dollar order to some news])a|)('r is nothing extraordinary for him, providing 
the paper is of Miiflicicnt iin})()rtaiice. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 



Mr. Helmbold has not always been successful, as, owing to business con- 
vulsions, he failed a few years ago, but soon recovered himself and went on 
a^ if the foir winds of prosperity had never ceased to blow. 



A Just Reward. — A notable example of the success which surely follows 
energy, honesty, fair dealing, and a liberal use of printers' ink, is furnished in 
the firm of Geo. P. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New 
York. This is one of the youngest houses in the advertising business in the 
whole country, and is among the most prosperous. The firm commenced 
business in Boston in 1865, but their success was so great that they soon 
removed to the great metropolis of the nation, where they located them- 
selves, in elegant quarters, about three years ago. Before that time their 
business connections were confined almost exclusively to the Middle and New 
England States, but since then they have enormously extended it, until now 
the evidences of their enterprise, in the shape of advertisements, may be 
found in almost every journal of any note from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
from the Canadas to the Gulf, and, doubtless, the Alaska Herald, if such is not 
already the case, will soon receive "ads" and money through the instrumen- 
tality of this indomitable agency. They not only consider advertising 
just the thing to bring business and wealth to other men, but, like the 
physician who has confidence in his own remedies, they employ it liberally 
for themselves. Not long since they inserted in the New York Herald, Times, 
and Tribune, full page advertisements, for which they paid two thousand dol- 
lars in cash, and during the same week they expended in advertising in other 
directions four thousand more, making one thousand dollars per day for the 
whole week. And this is but a small fraction of what they expend a year to 
advertise themselves. We have no means of knowing the amount of money 
which does go to newspapers, from them, for their own business per annum, 
but the New York Jlail puts their mere office expenses at forty thousand 
dollars. 

It is not our purpose to say one word against other advertising agencies. 
There are several of them conducted by thoroughly reliable and upright gen- 
tlemen, and good business men, too, but somehow they all seem to lack some- 
thing of that peculiar energy and executive talent which have made 
this one so unprecedentedly successful. We have done, and are still 
doing, business with quite a number of advertising agencies throughout 
thi' country, and have no fault to find with them, but Messrs. G. P. R. 
& Co. give us more business than any other. Furnishing large amounts 
of advertising at fair figures, and paying promptly, has put this house 
at the very head of agencies, and has made them a name for honesty, reli- 
ability, liberality, and promptness, which of itself is worth a fortune. May 
the firm exist a thousand years, may they make a million dollars each year, 
and may the Courier, at the end of the tenth century, still enjoy their favors 
as thick and fast as in this year. — Muscatine Courier. 



SILAS S. PACKAKD. 



This gentleman, who is extensively known as an educator, and more re- 
cently as the editor and publisher of Packard's Monthly, is nearly forty-three 
years of age, but Avould readily pass for thii'ty. He is rather slightly built, 
of medium height, with light complexion and blue eyes, and has the presence 
of an active, energetic, capable business man. He was born in Cunnington, 
Massachusetts, a brisk little village nestling among the hills of Hampshire 
County, and renowned as being the birth-place of William Cullen Bryant. 
He removed to Licking County, Ohio, Avhen a young boy, where he received 
what of education he has obtained from schools. He left home at the age 
of sixteen and engaged in teaching, which business he has followed in va- 
rious connections, and with occasional intervals, to the present time. He 
spent three years — from 1845 to 1848 — in Kentucky; and removed thence to 
Cincinnati, where he became connected as teacher of penmanship with Bart- 
lett's Commercial College, then in the zenith of its fame and financial suc- 
cess. He remained connected with this institution two years, during which 
time he was married; removed thence to Adrian, Michigan, where he spent 
eighteen months as teacher and editor of a local educational monthly. In 
the fall of 1857 he removed to Lockport, New York, and was, for nearly two 
years, connected with the Union School of that city. In the fall of 1858 he 
became editor, and shortly afterwards proprietor of a weekly newspaper in 
the village of Tonawanda, Erie County, situated on the Niagara Kiver, mid- 
way between Buffalo and Niagara Falls. This paper, though necessarily 
restricted in its circulation and advertising patronage, was marked by the 
best features of a country newspaper. It had the distinguishing quality of 
being always alive to the local interests of the village in Avhich it was 
printed. Tonawanda, through the efforts of certain capitalists of Cleveland, 
who had invested largely in its real estate, had just previous to this date set 
up loud assertions of competition with the neighboring city of Buffalo, 
basing its principal claim upon its sjilciidid liarbor, its ready facilities for 
transhipment to the P^rie Canal, and tlie Ihcl of its being open to lake navi- 
gation in the spring weeks ])revious to Buffalo, the harbor of which is usually 
jammed full of ice from the prevailing western winds, long after the channel 
is clear down the Niagara River. Mr. Packard, through his paper, the 
Niagara Eiver Pilot, kept these facts before the ])eople, to the no small annoy- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 45 

ance of the Biitlalo editors, who expended their ridicule and small wit upon 
the pretensions of the " one-horse town." The impetus in and taste for jour- 
nalism which three years' conduct of this local paper gave him has never forsaken 
him, and during the years which have elapsed since he left this field in 1856 he 
has been constantly desirous to return to the editorial quill. In the fall of 1856, 
at the earnest solicitation of Messrs. Bryant & Stratton, who had established 
the second of their mercantile colleges in the city of Buffalo, Mr. Packard took 
charge of this institution for a short time, but very soon moved to Albany, 
where, under the patronage of the same firm, he established the Albany Bus- 
iness College. In the spring of 1858 he removed to New York city and 
became the editor of the American Merchant^ a monthly magazine, published 
by Bryant & Stratton in the interest of business education. In the fall of tlie 
same year he established, with these gentlemen, in the Cooper Institute build- 
ing — then just completed — the New York Business College, which has since 
grown to be one of the most important and flourishing institutions in the 
country. Two years ago this college passed by purchase under the sole pro- 
prietorship of Mr. Packard, and now occupies the entire fourth, and a large 
share of the third story of the Mortimer Block, situated on the corner of 
Broadway, Twenty-second street, and Fifth Avenue, and having in daily at- 
tendance between three hundred and four hundred students. 

In May, 1868, Mr. Packard commenced the publication of his monthly 
magazine, now so generally known throughout the country. Shortly after its 
commencement he made the acquaintance of Mr. Oliver Dyer — then, as now, 
one of the editors of the New York Ledger^ and a practicing lawyer. Mr. 
Dyer, in connection with missionary labor in the Fourth Ward, had come 
across one John Allen, the keeper of a low dance house in Water street, 
whose strange characteristics, mixing the wildest profanity and debauchery 
with the Bible and spiritual songs, made him a most excellent subject for a 
sketch. Mr. Packard employed Mr. Dyer to " write up" this man and his 
den in a magazine article, which he did. The sketch, which was exceedinoly 
graphic and unique, was published in the July number of Packard'' s Monthly^ 
under the astonishing title of " The Wickedest Man in New York." Th.e 
boldness and aptness of the title and the still greater boldness of the article 
itself, which gave names, numbers, and facts without disguising, created 
throughout the country a marked sensation, and brought the name of 
Packard's Monthly so prominently before the public that its success, with judi- 
cious management, was assured. Mr. Packard, however, had the shrewdness 
to see that a permanent success in literature could not be made by one short 
magazine article, and that whatever might be the ability of his new contribu- 
tor, there was little prospect of his finding material to answer the expecta- 
tions which the " Wickedest Man" article had excited. Enough was done, 
however, to prove that there was an untried but fruitful specialty in journal- 
ism, and that, if the public could only be supplied with facts that were of 
sufiicient interest, they would willingly forego fiction. He therefore hung 
out his banner, inscribing thereon, " Truth stranger than Fiction," and set 
to work, supplying through the pens of writers, known and unknown, the 
most trenchant and readable matter on social, political, and professional 
topics a liberal outlay of time and money would secure. He also advertised 



46 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

libt'ra'ly, hihI has succrctUMl in cstatilishiiiir a inatraziiu' willi a I'u'kl peculiarly 
its own, and whicli has belbre it a wiik' area of beiieticence. 

In the year 1859, Mr. Packard prepared for the press the most chiborate 
and extensive text-book on tlie Science and Practice of Accounts ever pub- 
lished in this country. It is extensively used in the higli-schools and colleijes, 
an<l forms the basis of instruction in the International ^Association of Busi- 
ness Colleges, which has absorbed the Bryant & Stratton chain, and has 
separate institutions located in all the principal cities of the United States 
and Canada. 

Mr. Packard is a liberal advertiser, believes in it, and acts up to his 
belief lie has, on two or three occasions, expended in a single day on the 
daily papers of the city over two thousand dollars in presenting the claims 
of his institution; and, like all men who advertise boldly and intelligently, he 
has always met adequate results. He has laid broad and sure the foundations 
of success in his college and magazine, and a bright future is before him. 



Advertising Agexcies. — In common with other large advertisers, we 
have had occasion during the last five years to do business with advertising 
agents to a large extent. We have tried nearly all the various agencies, but 
came to the conclusion long ago that we could do better by giving our busi- 
ness to G. P. Row^ell & Co., 40 Park Row^, New York, than by employing 
any other persons. This firm probably does a heavier business than 
any other advertising agency in the country. They are prepared to 
insert an advertisement in one or four thousand papers, and at the pub- 
lishers' lowest prices. We have tried them — doing business with them 
weekly — and we knoto they can do our advertising better and cheaper than 
we could do it ourselves. Having the most extensive facilities for doing 
business, they never make mistakes; at least, they never make mistakes 
on our work. They are also the publishers of the Advertiser's Gazette, a 
monthly journal devoted to the interests of advertisers. It may be because 
we are interested in advertising, but we find the Gazette the most interesting 
paj)er we receive. Publishers and advertisers could not well dispense 
with it. And we advise all who have an interest in advertising to 
subscribe. If you have any advertising to do, we recommend you to let 
Messrs. G. P. Rowell & Co. do it. They can do it better and cheaper, and 
they know all there is to be known as to the value of the various papers, and 
can give you valuable information. We say this judging from experience. 
We know it has paid us to deal with them, and finding them ])rompt, honor- 
able, and reliable business men, we take pleasure in recommending them to 
the public, and the advertising jjubllc in pai'ticular. — S/ar Sjxnif/lex/ Banner. 



JOHN WANAMAKER. 



Though so well known and so extensively patronized, John Wanamaker, 
one ot the leading clothiers of Philadelphia, is yet a yoimg man and has a 
very juvenile appearance. This immense business has been the work of the 
past ten years — hard work at times, but never carried on in any other than a 
go-ahead spirit, an unflagging energy, and an indomitable will. He began his 
business career in a rather small way, in company with Nathan Brown, and 
the firm name, Wanamaker & Brown, has become as familiar to the people all 
over the country as Franklin's maxims or George Francis Train's odd sayings. 
Like all other beginners who start in a trade that is as old as civilization and 
open to every man, the new firm had to encounter the opposition of experi- 
enced clothiers, and of a host that had but a short start of them, yet this did 
not in any manner dampen the ardor of John Wanamaker, who is the ac- 
knowledged head of the concern. He early saw that to sit down, tape 
measure in hand, and wait for customers of an inquiring turn of mind to pick 
out his shop from the many by which it was encompassed, merely by having 
two or three well-dressed dummies at the door or a half dozen coats and as 
many pairs of pants swinging and fluttering in the breeze along the store 
front, was not exactly the way to carry on business in these latter days, and 
he resolved to make himself and his establishment known through the medium 
of newspapers, as the very best way of securing public patronage, and in a 
comparatively short space of time he had succeeded in turning the eyes and 
feet of a large number of people towards his mart of fashion. Few of our 
citizens have more than a faint idea of the large amount of money expended 
by some tradesmen in advertising their goods. They see an advertisement in 
a newspaper which they occasionally meet with, long or short, as the case may 
be, and that is all. If they had the privilege of inspecting the daily exchanges 
of a first-class newspaper, through many of which the same or similar busi- 
ness notices are to be found, they might well wonder how such expenditures, 
distinct from current, in-door ones, could be met. The seeming doubt created 
would be resolved if Mr. Wanamaker should open his books and show the 
extent of his sales as the result of the outlay for drawing custom. In every 
business in which the profits are small or moderate, there must be large sales 
to warrant such expenditures, and the sales are not likely to be so without 
liberal advertising. Suppose they can be increased Iroto five thousand to ten 
thousand dollars per week, at ten per cent, profit to fhe dealer above expenses, 
there would be an addition of five hundred dollars every six working days, 
and in the same ratio its increase can be continued bv adding: to the number 



48 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

of customers. li" ten per cent, additional will pay the whole cost of carrying 
on the trade, the advertising may be prolitably enlarged in the proportion 
that the addition to the receipts justifies it. From this it may be seen at a 
glance exactly how the tradesman, who has given the subject the thought it 
deserves, can add to his profits and astonish simple-minded people who plow 
in the same easy-going way their lathers did before them, never going out of 
the beaten track. 

Much less than a hundred years ago, in the days of slow-coaches and 
very slow people, when business men were content with few sales and small 
profits, it made little difference whether a tradesman advertised his goods or 
not. But the whole course of trade and traflic has undergone as much change 
as other things, and now it is indispensible that he should keep up with the 
progressive spirit of the times, and he is certain to succeed best who in busi- 
ness tact, and the liberal expenditure of money, leads rather than follows in 
the race. It is doubtful if any retail clothier in the United States scattei'S as 
much money among newspaper people as John Wanamaker. A new estab- 
lishment recently opened by him on Chestnut street, one of the most exten- 
sive on that fashionable thoroughfare, is being brought into notice by the same 
means that the Market street house was made known. It is advertised as con- 
taining clothing plain and nobby, cut artistically, warranted to fit, and superior 
in all respects. It has connected with it a juvenile department as complete 
in all its arrangements as the adult customer branch, and affords facilities for 
dressing little people not often met with. Thus much of John Wanamaker 
as a clothier. Outside of his business he is as active and energetic as he is in 
it. When a mere boy he became a member of the Young jNIen's Christian 
Association, and, being a ready speaker and a pushing fellow, he soon made 
his mark, and he is now one of the foremost of that organization. Four or 
five years ago, in company with others of his own spirit, he set about the col- 
lection of funds for the building of a chapel and Sunday school, on a large 
scale, in a part of the city not well provided with either. It was a gigantic 
undertaking, conceived in a spirit of Christian benevolence, and requiring 
efforts of no ordinary kind to carry it out. That the work was accomplished 
according to the design of the founders, and that it stands a monument of 
what may be done by \vell-directed effort, are lacts beyond dispute. 

The subject of our sketch is not one of those who would hide his light 
under a bushel or do a good act without caring to let it be known. His name 
is cut in enduring granite on the front of one of the fountains which stand 
near Independence Hall, with " presented by" as a prefix, while the lady wlio 
subscribed sufficient to erect the other had too much modesty to let the way- 
farer know, as he stops for a cool draught of water, to whose liberality he is 
indebted for it. But the irrepressible John was only following out a work he 
had begun some time before. He had caused the universal " Wanamaker & 
Brown" to be chiseled on the street crossings, painted on rocks, and mounted 
on house-tops. That they have not been waited to the clouds, and tied to the 
tail of a fiery comet, is only because Yankee ingenuity has not yet devised 
the ways and means. No doubt the seeming impossibility would be at- 
tempted did not newspaper advertising fall in so entirely with the views and 
feelings of the head of the firm. 



J. ESTEY & CO. 



The manuihcture of melodeons in Brattleboro commenced in the year 
1846. Like most of the great and lucrative business schemes of the present 
day, the beginning was a very humble one, barely two men being employed. 
It progressed, with the usual ups and downs, until the year 1849, when the 
persons engaged in it caught the then raging California fever and desired 
to give up the business, giving, as an additional reason, that the country was 
" flooded with reed instruments," and, therefore, the further manufacture of 
them could not be made to pay. Jacob Estey, however, then about thirty- 
five years old, with the keen foresight and shrewd business tact which has 
always characterized him, thought diiferently. Melody and harmony, to his 
mind, were not yet at a discount in America, and he became at once inter- 
ested in the business, although only as a silent partner. The demand for 
instruments continued to increase, and with it were enlarged the conveniences 
for their manufacture, until, in 1857, the name of the firm had become Estey 
& Greene, and the buildings used by them were where now stand the estab- 
lishments of Smith & Coffin, carpenters, and George E. Selleck, printer. 
During this year, misfortune overtook them, and their manufactories were 
entirely destroyed by fire. Nothing daunted, however, and still clinging to 
the idea that the country was not, even yet, " flooded with reed instruments," 
Messrs. Estey & Greene immediately purchased the land directly oppo- 
site the site upon which their former buildings had stood, being compelled 
to buy of six or eight difierent parties in order to procure the desired 
amount, and new edifices were at once erected on the spot where they now 
stand. After these factories were up Mr. Greene retired from the firm, 
and from that time on till January, 1864, the demand for the Estey melodeon 
continued to increase, and at that date between forty-five and fifty workmen 
were engaged in their manufacture, some seventy-five or eighty instruments 
being turned out per month. On the 7th day of January, 1864, the destroy- 
ing element again visited Brattleboro, and again entirely burned to the 
ground the whole establishment. Jacob Estey continued the business alone, 
beginning at once, with his accustomed energy, to rebuild his factoi'ies. The 
lumber for the new buildings, at the time of the fire on the 7th day of Jan- 
uary, stood in the woods, was cut, sawed, and delivered upon the grounds 
4 



50 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

ready for use by the 'I'M day of February, and in twenty-tive days' time the 
buikliugs now standing were erected, enclosed, plastered, machinery in and 
men at work — an example of indomitable energy and perseverance rarely 
equaled, and two of the chief characteristics of the man, Jacob Estey. In 
January, 1865, Mr. Estey took in two partners, and the firm was known as 
J. Estey & Co., Avhich continued until April, 1866, when these partners 
retired, Mr. Estey taking in two others, his son-in-law, Levi K. Fuller, and 
son, Julius J. Estey, the name of the firm continuing the same. Imme- 
diately afterward, the new firm purchased two acres of ground on Flat street, 
and commenced the erection of new and extensive buildings thereon, the ones 
already in use being entirely inadequate to the demands of their still rapidly- 
increasing business. The new building was up and occupied on the 1st day 
of September, 1866. All of their factories have been, since that time, and 
are now, in full blast; they employ two hundred hands; turn out over three 
hundred instruments per month; pay about one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand dollars per year lor help alone ; own over ten thousand dollars' 
worth of real estate, and have invested, in the village of Brattleboro, about 
two hundred thousand dollars. 

Having thus given a brief history of the rise and progress of the import- 
ant enterprise, let us pass to a more critical examination of the buildings 
and the details of the business. 

The old factory is so called because it was erected prior to the other, 
not because it is essentially an old structure. Another building is the " dry- 
house," where the wood used in the manufacture of the celebrated cottage 
organs is properly seasoned. The heat in this dry-house, which is supplied 
by a network of large and small steam-pipes, is kept at an average height of 
one hundred and thirty degrees. The lumber is kept here — after having been 
cut two years at least — from three to six months, rosewood excepted, it be- 
ing subjected to at least a ten months' heating and drying process. 

A large building is the property known as the " old factory," it being 
the one so expeditiously erected in 1864. The small "L" between the dry- 
house and main building contains a thirty-horse power engine which runs the 
machinery, not only of this establishment, but of another across the street, 
being connected with the latter by a shaft laid under the road. Upon the 
first floor of the " old factory " the stuff is saAved out and placed ready for 
use in the manufacture of the organ cases, which are made on the next floor 
above and put together upon the third floor. Upon the third floor in the 
rear, in rooms especially set apart for these purposes, are cai-ried on by ex- 
perienced workmen two of the most delicate portions of work connected 
with the manufacture of the celebrated " cottage organ " — the making of the 
" reeds " and the " reed-boards." The " reeds " manuliictured by Estey & 
Co. have a wide reputation for sweetness and durability. The machinery by 
which they are made is patented and owned by the firm, and new improve- 
ments are being constantly added. Some six or eight tons per year of brass 
are used in the manufacture of the reeds — which are in reality ^/te instrument, 
for upon their excellence depends the tone and quality of the organ when 
finished. In the room where the reed-boards are made may be found some 
of the finest-working and most delicately-arranged machinery in the Mhole 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 51 

establisliiuent. To attempt an adequate description of the same without 
diagrams would be useless, but some little idea of its efficacy may be gath- 
ered from the fact that the cutters which scoop out the receptacles for the 
reeds revolve eight thousand two hundred times per minute. This speed 
has not been obtained, that we are aware, elsewhere. In a small room upon 
the top floor of the " old factory " the carving of the legs for the melodeons 
and cases for the organs is done, mostly by hand. Upon this floor, also, the 
cases are fitted together, and from thence taken to the new factory, to the 
top or fourth floor of which they are hoisted, by means of a large elevator. 
Here they are varnished, polished, and made ready for the reception of the 
most important portions, the reeds, bellows, etc. Upon the second floor the 
" actions " — key-boards and their connections with the valves which, together 
with the reeds, produce the sweet melody for which the cottage organs are 
so justly celebrated — are made, as also are the bellows, pedals, stops, etc. 
These being finished, and the cases also having been made ready, both are 
taken to the third floor, where the actions are put in and the organs put in 
shape for the hands of the tuners. This portion of the work is performed by 
experienced musicians, each one having a room set apart for his own use, 
from ofi" the warerooms, where, day after day, may be heard every note of 
the gamut from the lowest sub-bass to the highest treble, each note being 
tested and tried with a thoroughness and exactness which render discords 
absolutely out of the question. The instruments, thus completed, are placed 
in the warerooms to await the packing and shipping process, which is con- 
stantly going on, Messrs. Estey & Co. being unable to keep any number of 
their organs on hand, owing to the constantly increasing demand for them 
from all parts of the country. 

Upon the first floor of this building are made the packing boxes ; in the 
" L " part is another drying-house or room, in addition to the one already de- 
scribed as attached to "the old factory ;" the low, round-roofed building on 
the left and rear, made entirely of brick and iron, contains another thirty- 
horse power engine which drives the machinery. The entire building, as well 
as the dry-house, is heated by steam-pipes and lighted with gas, and is fur- 
nished with fire extinguishers and other necessary appurtenances. 

The terrible flood which swept over our land October 4, 1869, did not 
escape Brattleboro in its work of devastation, nor did the house of J. Estey 
& Co. go unharmed. The mountain streams came rushing down with much 
force, swelling as they went, carrying away dams, mills, shops, factories, and 
houses, till they reached to waves of tremendous height and swept around the 
shops of Estey & Co., through their lumber yard, and destroying about two 
thousand dollars' worth of lumber and other property. Since then they have 
diked and entrenched strongly for future protection. At the time of the 
flood they were about erecting another large shop to accommodate their rap- 
idly increasing business ; but the floods have changed all this, and they have 
bought a lot of sixty acres of land a few rods west of their present site, and 
on higher ground, and already are erecting the largest and most extensive 
organ works in the world. 

The manufactories of Messrs. J. Estey & Co. form one of the principal 
elements of the prosperity of the village of Brattleboro, supporting a large 



m THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

number of families, who in their turn contribute very largely to the siii»i»ort 
of the ditferent stores in the place, while much of the material used by Kstey 
■& Co. is purchased by them of the merchants, creating a demand which 
would not, otherwise, be necessary. Aside from their particular business, 
this firm have always manifested a degree of interest in the M'eUare of the 
place, and generally an enterprising disposition which does them much credit, 
and has added in no small degree to the })rogress which Brattleboro is stead- 
ily making. 

This firm are also noted, besides the excellence of their organs, for the 
amount of their advertising. Every paper in Northern New England bears 
testimony to the extent and persistency with which they have given publicity 
to their business, and Mr. George Brown, an extensive music dealer, and one 
of their agents, has borrowed money at two per cent, a month, and found it 
to pay, in discharging his advertising lulls. The company, of course, have 
never done this, being possessed of ample means. 



Advertising Agencies. — Several of our exchanges have favored a con- 
vention of newspaper publishers to take steps for securing advertising direct 
from those desiring the work done, rather than through the medium of the 
various advertising agencies. They assert that many newspapers are not only 
swindled by irresponsible concerns of this kind, but are required by respon- 
.silde agencies to furnLsh their space at too low prices, and the firm of Geo. 
P. Rowell & Co. has been mentioned in connection with the latter of these 
classes. For our part, we had rather deal with responsible agencies, who 
pay cash, than to trust to the many doubtful and uncertain firms who 
apply with fair professions and pretentious liberality and flat out before 
pay-day comes. We think it extremely doubtful whether an advertising 
association would do the business any more cheaply or satisfactorily than it 
is now done by the several responsible agencies. Individual and private 
effort is almost invariably more energetically and economically conducted 
than by organizations, which are usually officered by men unfit to conduct 
their own business successfully. — Delaware Jiejmblican. 



About Advkutisixg. — The proprietor of an extensive establishment in 
this region, in sending in his order for a new advertisement recently, says : 
" I have doubled my trade in the last eighteen months through advertising, 
and shall in ls7U invest double in that line what I have in any previous year." 

Here is the unsolicited testimony of a prosperous business man as to 
the great secret of business success. To sell goods or services, the owner 
must inform the public where they can be procured. — Corw lieptihlican., 
J^ancaster^ X. II. 



THOMAS HOLLOWAY. 



The system of advertising has been carried to a far greater extent in 
England than here. Single merchants spend forty or fifty thousand pounds 
annually in increasing their business, and find that it pays, and one drug 
dealer, Thomas Hollo way, far exceeds this. Mr. Hollo way is now 
about sixty-five years of age, having been born in 1804. His business in the 
line in which he is now known commenced on the 15th of October, 1837. 
He had little capital, and could not make large ventures, and the medicines 
had not been ottered to the piiblic before he began to advertise them. One 
hundred poimds were spent in one week in advertising their merits, with the 
discouraging result of selling only two pots of ointment. No one would 
then have accepted the medicines as a gift. The most assiduous industry and 
the most rigid economy were required to enable him to carry on the busi- 
ness, and Mr. Plolloway began his day's work at four in the morning and 
continued it until ten in the evening to do that himself for which otherwise 
he must have paid. His remedies obtained for a time little or no favor, but 
this did not daunt him ; he went on advertising judiciously and with deter- 
mination, and in the end succeeded in creating for his preparations a limited 
reputation throughout the British Isles, which might have satisfied him at one 
time ; but, as desires increase with what they feed upon, he made up his mind 
to be content with nothing less than girdling the globe with places for the 
sale of his remedies. To obtain knowledge about foreign countries of which 
there did not exist full descriptions, some Cathay of the distance, he used to 
inquire of the captains of vessels sailing to remote parts, and stored up in 
his mind the information they had given for future use. It was a rule with 
him from the commencement to use judiciously all the money he could spare 
in publicity, which went on increasing, and in the year 1842 he spent five 
thousand pounds in advertising. Time rolled on, and from the hitherto un- 
thought of outlay of five thousand he increased it to ten thousand pounds 
in 1845. At the time of the Great Exhibition in London in 1851 his expen- 
diture was twenty thousand per annum; in the year 1855 the cost of public- 
ity had risen to the sum of thirty thousand pounds, the American agency 
now selling and advertising largely, and in 1864 it had reached forty thousand, 
in advertising his medicines in every available manner throughout the globe. 
For the propter application of their use he has had most ample directions 



54 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

translated iuto nearly every known tongue, such as Chinese, Turkish, Arme- 
nian, Arabic, and in most of the vernaculars of India, together with all the 
languages spoken on the European continent. The American agency does a 
vast amount of advertising, and there is the most convincing proof to them 
of its success. Mr. HoUoway is still hale and heai'ty, and it is said that his 
expenses for publicity last year were about ninety thousand pounds, or 
about six hundred thousand dollai-s in our present currency. As a proof 
that the success is owing to advertising, we may point to the fact that on 
their introduction into France the inventor was compelled by law to give 
their formula, and it can consequently be ascei-tained. No other person, 
however, had the pluck and taith to advertise it, and no other person, conse- 
quently, reaps the golden reward. 



Cool! — We notice suspended in conspicuous places here and there in 
the city large thermometers surrounded by the advertising cards of 
diflferent business firms. He must be a meteorologist indeed who w^ill in 
cold winter weather (after taking the registry of the thermometer) stop to 
read what Tom, Dick, and Harry have to say about their various wares. In 
dog-days this interesting process would be more exhilerating, if indeed it 
did not equal a draft of Arctic soda or ice-cold Ottawa beer. Advertise in 
the Times^ and your statements will be pondered at the fireside when the 
mind is in a vastly more receptive state than when its possessor is peering 
through a frosty atmosphere upon a thermometer indicating a temperature 
of zero. — Troy Times. 



ADVEKTJsixfi by driblets scattered over the whole country is a waste 
of money. It is necessary to i)ut enough in one place to cause notice to be 
taken of it, for a two-line paragraph in one corner of a news23a})er attracts 
no attention at all. Repeat, and repeat boldly; sow the seed noi only in 
one jieriodical circulating in a given extent of country, but in all ili.ii llic 
commodity will bear. An advertisement may be seen twenty times without 
buying, but the twenty-first time the attention may be fixed. Do not be 
slow in saying wiial yoii lia\'e; more fortunes are lost by modesty than by 
boldness. 



GEORGE W. CHILDS. 



The career of Mr. George W. Childs affords one of the most remark- 
able instances of success through mere individual effort to be met with on 
the pages of biography. About twenty-five years ago Mr. Childs went from 
Baltimore, his native city, to Philadelphia to seek his fortune, resolved even 
at that early day to search for it in a way best calculated to find it, and to 
leave nothing undone on his part to deserve it. He was an imfriended boy 
of fifteen years of age, with no one to take him by the hand, yet he did not 
despair, even in moments of gloom and discouragement. Soon after his 
arrival he engaged with a bookseller, and for several years was a faithful 
shop-boy, careful no less of his employers' interests than of his own. While 
yet a mere boy, he commenced business on his own account ; and singularly 
enough occupied a portion of the building on the south-west corner of Chest- 
nut and Third streets, to which the Public Ledger^ a newspaper, now the 
property of Mr. Childs, was afterwards removed. In the year 1849, he being 
then in the twentieth year of his age, Mr. Childs became associated with the 
publishing firm of R. E. Peterson & Co., and the new firm, as Childs &, 
Peterson, soon acquired a popularity the old one had not enjoyed. One of 
the first books issued from the press under this management was " Peterson's 
Familiar Science," which was very popular, not less by reason of its merit 
than the means employed to make the reading public acquainted with it. 
The foundation of Mr. Childs's fortune, it may be safely asserted, was laid in 
the publication of " Dr. Kane's Arctic Explorations," a book which put 
money into the pockets of everybody who had anything to do with it. 
Probably no American book was ever more prominently brought before the 
people of the country. The circumstances under which Dr. Kane made the 
voyage, his youth, and the interest he excited in the public mind, together 
with extended newspaper publications, all tended to give the book an unu- 
sually large sale. Great credit was unquestionably due to Dr. Kane as an 
explorer and an author, but whatever popularity his book attained for its 
elegant embellishments is due to James Hamilton, the well-known marine 
painter. The sketches, it is true, were Dr. Kane's own, but it required the 
eye, the hand, and the skill of genius to make anything out of them, and how 
well the artist succeeded is known to every one familiar with the book, 
which in the lapse of time has lost little of its popiilarity. It may be safely 



56 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

asserted tliat without the aid of the newspaper press the work wouLl have 
been comparatively unknown. Dr. Kane's early death, the notice taken of it 
by public bodies, the sympathy everywhere expressed, the reception of the 
remains upon reaching the United States from Havana, and the obsequies at 
last, the body being followed to its final resting-place at Laurel Hill by all 
classes and conditions of people, were well calculated to increase the desire 
to read the work of the lamented author. 

The firm of Childs & Peterson coutinued in existence eleven 
years, during which time it published a number of useful books, 
nearly all of which, mainly through Mr. Childs's eftbrts, had a large sale. 
In the year 1860 Mr. Childs become associated with the firm of J. B. 
Lippincott & Co., but he remained in it only a short time, and then com- 
menced book-publishing on his OAvn account. About four years after nego- 
tiations were commenced for the purchase of the Ptiblic Ledger, a newspaper 
which under Swain, Abel & Simmons had attained a very large circulation, 
and was regarded as one of the best paying establishments of the kind in 
the United States. That it had been so was unquestionable, and it was even 
then regarded as an advertising medium without a superior, but bad manage- 
ment, or more properly, no management at all, had made a material change 
in its fortunes. jMr. Simmons had been dead some years, Mr. Abel was man- 
aging the Baltimore Sun and had his hands full, and Mr. Swain was not 
giving any attention to the Philadelphia interests nor to any other, for the 
matter of that. As a consequence, while the circulation was kept up, and 
the business seemed to be good, the receipts were small, and did not meet 
current expenses. However little Mr. Swain might have been disposed to 
sell the Ledger under other circumstances, or even as it was, his Baltiniore 
partner insisted upon it, and Mr. Swain had to yield, and he did so with the 
best grace possible. Towards the close of the year, the paper, with all its 
type, presses, fixtures, the job office, and the weekly paper, all passed into 
the possession of Mr. Childs. It need not be said that the announcement of 
the sale was a surprise to the public, though Mr. Swain's failings were well 
known, l)ut when at the same time it was stated that George W. Childs 
was the purchaser there was a feeling of general satisfaction. He had no 
sooner entered upon possession than he commenced needed reforms, .and 
gave to the publication his entire supervision, watching it with the utmost 
ca-e. Very soon he began to look about for new quarters, and purchasing 
the block of stores on the south-west corner of Sixth and Chestnut streets 
and the adjoining buildings on Sixth street, sufficient for his purposes, he 
had plans and specifications ])repared for the new Ledger building, which Avas 
erected in 18(15-66 and taken ])ossession of in June, 1866, the o])ening being 
attended by a dinner at the Continental, which drew together a most bril- 
liant assemldage of public men and newspaper people, citizens, statesmen, 
soldiers, and authors. Mr. Childs has pu])Iis]ied a beautifully-illustrated 
volume, containing a full description of the building, the speeches made on 
the occasion, and the letters received from distinguished men. The affair 
was wisely managed, and as the effect was to bring the new location into im- 
mediate notice the expenditure was judicious. The paper has nourished 
more than ever since Mr. Childs has had it under his control, but he has dis- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 57 

tributed the profits liberally among the people in his employment, and by 
his course has made every one of them a fast friend, eager and ready to 
serve him. He is now in the fortieth year of his age ; yet time sits so lightly 
upon him that he seems scarcely more than thirty. With all his wealth, and 
his income last year reached the handsome sum of one hundred and sixty 
thousand dollars, Mr. Childs has in no degree changed. In feeling, in the 
treatment of those under him, and in his intercourse with them he is as he 
ever has been, nor does he have less faith in the benefit of liberal advertis- 
ing, now that he is a newspaper publisher, than when he was a patron of 
the press. 



Advektising. — There are yet many slow and old-fashioned business 
men who think that advertising doesn't pay. For the information of such 
we give the experience of a few of the most successful business men,, 
expressed in their own language : 

" Without advertisements I should be a poor man to-day." — H. T. 
Helmbold. 

" My success is owing to my liberality in advertising." — Bonner. 

" Advertising has furnished me with a competence." — Amos Lawrence. 

" I advertised my productions and made money." — Nicholas Longworth. 

" Constant and persistent advertising is a sure prelude to wealth." — 
Stephen Girard. 

" He who invests one dollar in business should invest one dollar in 
advertising that business." — A. T. Stewart. 



Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co. have facilities imsurpassed by any 
advertising agency in this country. We cannot too strongly recommend 
them as indefatigable, energetic, prompt, and reliable. — Ptddisher d/ul 
JBookseller, JVeio York. 



THE GOVERNMENT LOAN ADVERTISING. 



The readers of newspapers during the latter years of tlie great rebellion 
had new experiences of the science of advertising. Long advertisements 
had been known before ; private firms had spent money liberally in putting 
their wares before the people, but never before had there been as Avide-spread, 
as uniformly extensive, as thoroughly forced upon the attention of the public, 
an enterprise as the Government Loans. The history of this inauguration 
of financial advertising upon a large scale is interesting and valuable to all 
who would learn wisdom by the experience of their predecessors. 

During the earlier years of the war Secretary Chase was necessarily 
largely dependent upon the efibrts of bankers to aid him by active co-opera- 
tion in disposal of the loan of 5-20's authorized by Congress. Among the 
most energetic and successful of these was the banking firm of Jay Cooke & 
Co. So pre-eminent did Mr. Cooke become in thus assisting and encouraging 
the Secretary that he was at length made General Agent for the negotiation 
of that Government Loan. Recognizing the power of the public press, and 
the vital importance of securing its co-operation in the work, Mr. Cooke 
advertised largely, and proved the wisdom of his course, for in eighteen 
months he had sold five hundred million dollars of the 5-20's at an ex- 
pense, including commissions to agents, of only about one-half of one per 
cent., an expenditure which was but trifling in comparison with that of any 
similar loan ever negotiated in Europe. It was frequently alleged during 
this employment of Mr. Cooke's services and judgment that he was a rela- 
tive of the Secretary, and that favoritism had been therefore shown m put- 
ting the negotiation of this loan into his hands. This allegation was entirely 
unjust and untrue. Mr. Chase gave the work and the small proportionate 
profit to Mr. Cooke simply because he had been the most energetic and suc- 
cessful of all the Government sub-agents, and this success aroused the 
jealousy which promjjted these charges. It was at first intended to do the 
requisite advertising direct from the Treasury Department, but the Secretary 
soon found that there was no one connected with the Department who had 
the familiarity with newspapers — their relative prices for advertising and 
their comparative circulation and importance — necessary for the work to be 
done sagaciously and economically. After Secretary Cliase had put the 
system of National Banks in operation (about two hinidrcd having been 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 59 

established), he determined to entrust the furtlier negotiation of Govern- 
ment loans to them. The 10-40 loan was brought out in March, 1854. Mr. 
Chase's plan was to authorize the National Banks to expend one-twentieth of 
one per cent, upon their sales of bonds in advertising. The spring of 1864 
was, it will be remembered, the darkest time of the war. The nation 
had become discouraged at the want of success to our arms, and the rapid 
accumulation of the public debt (reaching, at the time, an amount of about 
one billion seven hundred million dollars) led the people to fear it was too 
large to be ever paid. On the day of opening the 10-40 loan, about four 
million dollars were taken, mainly through the personal influence of Hon. 
John J. Cisco, then Assistant Treasurer of the United States at New York, 
but owing to the cause we have mentioned, and to a want of an active execu- 
tive head to manage the negotiations, subsequent subscriptions were small, and 
more disheartening than encouraging. The bad policy of entrusting the adver- 
tising to the discretion of local banks soon became manifest in the style of the 
announcements which appeared in the newspapers. The banks, having just 
begun business, were more urgent in making tlieraselves conspicuous than in 
pushing the national loan. The First National Bank of Smithville would 
have an advertisement something like this in the Smithville Banner of 
Freedom : 

First National Bank of Smithville, 
JOHN SMITH, President. 
JOHN SMITH, Jr., Cashier. 
Money, Bonds, or other Securities taken upon Deposit. Exchange upon 

New York or Foreign Cities bought and sold. Loans negotiated, and 

a general banking business transacted. 

Subscriptions received to the 1040 National Loan. 

Mr. Chase soon saw that this would not sell the Bonds. He sent for 
Mr. W. B. Shattuck, whom he had known in Ohio as the editor of a leading 
newspaper, who had given much attention to financial subjects, and who 
afterwards became a partner in the advertising agency firm of Peaslee & Co., 
New York, and had a consultation with him as to the best method of 
promoting the success of the loan. By request, Mr. Shattuck then sub- 
mitted in writing a plan of operations, which was examined and approved 
by the Secretary and other financial gentlemen. But this plan involved the 
expenditure of a large amount of money, and Mr. Chase hesitated, fearing 
that Congress would not justify him in expending such a sum. To this 
objection Mr. Shattuck replied that it was a more pertinent question whether 
Congress, having authorized the loan to be made and ajDpropriated a certain 
sum for expenses, would justify him in not spending whatever was necessary 
to accomplish the object in the shortest practicable time. The Secretary 
still hesitated, and concluded to make another experiment to sell the bonds 
solely through the National Banks ; but, finding that this attempt was likely 
to fail, as the other had done, he finally appointed Mr. Shattuck Special 
Agent to promote the sale of the 10-40 loan, and authorized him to carry out 
his plan for popularizing it. 

A leading part of the plan was to thoroughly inform the public of the 
amount of our national wealth, and our consequent ability to carry a much 



60 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

greater debt than had then l>een ineurre<l or proposed. A series of ques- 
tions rehitive to foreign countries, involving the amount of their indebted- 
ness, their development, the proportion which their indebtedness bore to past 
and present wealth, etc., were submitted to the librarian of the Astor 
Library, who employed his assistants to search out the facts desired. The 
result was embodied in a series of articles widely published, tending to 
restore confidence, and to prove that although our debt might amount to 
15 per cent, of our assets, yet so rapid would be our national increase that 
the ratio would be greatly reduced before the maturity of the liability. 
Pointed and skillful advertising accompanied these articles, and both were 
published in nearly all the newspapers of the Northern States, English and 
German, secular and religious, Republican and Democratic, political, liter- 
erary, professional, and manufacturing. The press, without distinction of 
party, aided in the work, the public mind responded to its influence, and the 
bonds began to be taken rapidly. The advertising was done on a liberal 
scale, as was needed, when the required results were so important ; yet it was 
conducted so thoroughly and systematically as to be the most truly econom- 
ical, and the result was satisfactory to the Secretary of the Treasury. It is 
worthy of note, as showing the conversion of the officers of the Govern- 
ment to the wisdom of employing advertising agencies, that all subsequent 
loans were put before the public through the same firm as had the above 
work in charge. It was found that gentlemen who made advertising a study, 
and the use of newspaper columns a science, alone had the knowledge and 
tact necessary to secure the greatest effect for any given sum of money. 

In the summer of 1864 Secretary Chase resigned, and was succeeded by 
Mr. Fessenden, much against the personal Avishes of the latter, he protest ng 
that he did not feel himself qualified for the exceedingly responsible duties of 
the position. The two men differed widely. Mr. Chase was a positive man. 
Having examined the bearings of any question, he quickly decided, and 
executed his decision with prompt energy. Mr. Fessenden, always distrust- 
ing himself, also distrusted the plans of others. He brought out the 7-80 
loan in August, 1864, and authorized Mr. Shattuck to spend a certam sum of 
money in starting it. That expended, he determined to leave the advertising 
to the National Banks. The experiment failed, as it had failed before. The 
banks had no concerted plan of action, their efforts were desultory, and the 
success was small. It became evident that more vigorous efforts 
must be made to place the bonds, and in February, 1865, Secretary 
Fessenden made a contract with Mr. Cooke to undertake the negotiation of 
the loan. The aspect of the war had now wholly changed. Grant and Sher- 
man were closing in upon the hitherto strongholds of the Confederacy and 
the rebellion was on its last legs. People were hopeful, and at no time d\ir- 
ing the period when the Government was a borrower was there so good a 
time for a Government loan to " run itself" as then. But even under 
these favorable auspices the Secretary found it wise to secure the services of 
so active and experienced a negotiator as jVIr. Cooke, and the latter, in turn, 
felt the necessity for an advertising agency in placing the features of the loan 
before the people. He authorized ]V[r. Shattuck to spend seventy-five 
thousand dollars in starting the bonds. Tlie anangement having been 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. «1 

jxo-reed upon in Mr. Cooke's office in Washington, the latter iUusti-ated his 
uniform kindly feeling toward the newspaper press, by saying to ]\[r. Shat- 
tuck : " Place our advertisement in all, or nearly all the papers of the 
country. Never refuse an advertisement to any publisher who has energy 
enough to come to you for it. His paper may be small and weak, and you 
can expend a large or small amount with him as you think best; but 
give him something. We may, in doing this, help to support a worthy man, 
or to keep a struggling publication from failing altogether." This instruction 
was carried out, and orders for bonds began to increase in multitude and 
amoimt, until Mr. Cooke's office was like an eddy in a snow-storm, each flake 
an order, each order a respond to the arguments and appeals made to the 
patriotism of the people through the newspaper press. A remittance for a 
fifty dollar bond from a lumberman on the Aroostook might be sandwiched 
between a one hundred dollar order from Ontonagon and one for half a 
million from Fisk & Hatch. The readiness to buy grew into eagerness ; the 
eagerness became a furore. Millions were sold daily, and in July, 1865, Mr. 
Cooke had sold seven hundred million dollars and closed out the loan. The 
advertising account, which was sent in and audited, was probably the largest 
which had at that time ever been rendered for any single enterprise ; but it 
was money well spent. Nothing was more clearly proved during this series 
of operations than that any enterprise which depends upon popular favor for 
success can be best presented and promoted only through the agency of 
those who, holding intimate and mutually profitable relations with all the 
newspapers of the country, can set a thousand influences at work at once, 
while saving time, labor, and money to their principals. 



The following testimony comes from a reliable and trustworthy source. 
Mr. Durno has for years made advertising a study : 

New York, Dec, 1868. 
Messrs. Geo. P. Kowell & Co. : 

Dear ^Sir: Some four or five years since, when you first originated your 
" Select Lists of One Hundred Newspapers," I apj^reciated your novelty and 
patronized you accordingly. 

Since then, seeing the advantages derived through your method by the 
increase of circulation, reduction of prices, and punctuality in all the depart- 
ments of your business, I now advocate your system as deserving the highest 
encomiums. Having advertised my specialty, "-Durno's Catarrh iSnuf,''' some- 
what extensively since 1850, permit me to acknowledge that, had your present 
plan then been in operation, it would have been a saving to me in the rates 
of advertising of at least twenty thousand dollars. 

I am, dear sir, yours truly, 

JAMES DUT^NO. 



CHARLES A. SHAW. 



Charles A. Shaw was boru in the town of Sanford, York County. 
Maine, November 5th, 1831, and is now thirty-eight years of age, and the 
oldest of five children, all living. He is a grandson of General Shaw, for- 
merly a prominent politician and business man in the Eastern States, and is a 
direct descendant of one of the most distinguished families among the set- 
tlers of New England, having come of excellent stock on both sides parentally. 
His father was a farmer in poor circumstances, and, having a large family to 
support, was unable to give hun any other than the most ordinary education, 
such as could be picked uji in four or five weeks of schooling annually, in a 
cold and dismal country schoolhouse, to which it was necessary to travel on 
foot for more than a mile each way in midwinter. He made rapid progress 
in all departments, but had a peculiar fondness for mathematics, his love of 
philosophical and mathematical studies amounting to enthusiasm, and all 
works on these subjects which he could obtain were read with the greatest 
avidity. 

From his earliest boyhood he was put to hard work on the form, and at 
thirteen was required to do a man's work. At fourteen he left home and 
commenced teaching, which he followed for a while with good success, and 
after attending one or two terms at an academy at Alfred, in bis native 
coimty, fitted for college under the instruction of the late Hon. Henry 
Holmes, a distinguished scholar, then residing in that place. Limited pecu- 
niary means, however, obliged him to abandon the idea of finishing his educa- 
tion and studying a profession, and so he turned his attention to mercantile 
afiairs, in which he at once made rapid progress. 

We next find him in Boston, managing a newspaper with energy and 
ability; and here, it is said, it was that he first became impressed with the 
power of that great prime mover in the business woild — advertising — whicli 
he has since used to such advantage. 

After serving a regular appi-enticeship at the watchmaker's and jeweler's 
trade, he commenced business for himself in the city of Biddoford, where he 
now resides, at. senior jjartner of the firm of Shaw & Clark, long well known 
as one of the most enterprising and successful business concerns in the 
country, and which has but recently been dissolved, after an existence of 
nearly fifteen years. During tliis period the radius of his business was con- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 63 

tinually exteiuling and widening, fso niucli so that even a briet descriptive 
outline would far exceed the limits of the present article ; in fact, it would be 
much easier to tell what he has not been engaged in than to rehearse the nu- 
merous entei-prises whicli have owed their success to his superior management 
within tliat tune. 

As an inventor, Mr. Shaw is well known, having, it is said, taken out more 
patents for inventions of his own than any other man in the country. Among 
the more important of these may be mentioned various improvements in cotton 
machinery, tanning apparatus, agricultural and domestic implements, sewing 
machines, etc., in all amounting to more than one hundred in number. The 
■well-known Shaw & Clark sewing-machine, the original foundation of all 
cheap sewing-machines, is of his invention. He is also the inventor of " Shaw's 
Pei'petual Pocket Almanac," of which several millions have been sold, and 
which is copyrighted in nearly every civilized country of the globe. This 
little invention, although comparatively unimportant, is recognized in the scien- 
tific world as a wonderful mathematical achievement, overcoming obstacles 
which had previously been considered insurmountable. He has also what is 
exceedingly rare with inventors — the faculty to make money out of his own 
inventions. 

In addition to his own productions, he is also largely interested as pro- 
prietor and manager in many most valuable inventions made by other parties, 
and, as a natural consequence, has been almost constantly engaged in exten- 
sive legal proceedings, which he has usually managed himself with the most 
distinguished ability and success, either defeating his adversary outright, or 
organizing victory from his own defeat. The celebrated Woodman card- 
stripper suits, involving immense interests, afford a good instance of his abil- 
ity in this respect, having been fought for years under the management of Mr. 
Shaw against the combined cotton manufacturers of the country, and finally 
decided in favor of the inventor. The great sewing-machine suit of Howe, 
Wheeler & Wilson, Grover & Baker, and Singer & Co., agamst Shaw^ & 
Clark, also affords another instance. This suit, which was in the United States 
Courts for several years, was brought by the combined sewing-machine com- 
panies and pressed with the greatest vigor, and all the advantages which 
unlimited means and the best legal talent afiorded only resulted in a license 
for the Shaw & Clark machine, the invention of Mr. Shaw. 

Among his other enterprises may be numbered the show business, in 
which he was at one time quite extensively engaged, owning several noted exhi- 
bitions, some of which he managed personally with great success, although he 
is now, and has been for several years, almost wholly disconnected Avith the 
business. He it was who first suggested to " Artemus Ward " the idea of 
lecturing, having brought him out in a course of one hundred nights, 
by which he cleared several thousand dollars, and established that great hu- 
morist permanently in the field of popular lecturers. He also supplied Arte- 
mus with the funds to provide the necessary paintings and bring out his cele- 
brated Mormon lectures in New York and the principal cities of the country, 
and afterwards sent him to Europe, being not only an ardent admirer of the 
genius of the great American humorist, but always a fi-iend in need. Hon. 
Edward Everett also frequently lectured for him, and remained his intimate 



64 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

friend until deatli. P. T. Barnuni. the world-renownefl sliowman, also deliv- 
ered a course of lectures under his auspices, becoming so favorably ini])ressed 
with his superior abilities as a manager that he immediately offered him ten 
thousand dollars per year in gold, and all expenses, to take charge of an exhi- 
bition he was then about sending to Europe, which is said to be the largest 
sun\ which Avas ever offered for a similar service, and which would have been 
accepted but for his numerous and pressing engagements at home. Mr. Shaw 
is also well known among the showmen as the proprietor of " Shaw's Hall," 
one of the most commodious and elegant theatres and lecture rooms in New 
England, built by him at an expense of over forty thousand dollars, for the 
benefit of his own city. The celebrated Panorama of Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, the most successful and best known exhibition of the kind which 
ever traveled, was also for many years owned, though not exhibited, by him 
personally. 

His offer of five thousand dollars for the original manuscript of President 
Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation is only one of numerous instances show- 
ing his keen foresight and intuitive perception in relation to speculative mat- 
ters. It will be remembered that Mr. Lincoln presented it to the Sanitary 
Fair at Chicago, to be sold for the benefit of the soldiers. Immediately on 
learning this fact, Mr. Shaw telegraphed offering two thousand dollars for it. 
As soon as this offer was made known the Proclamation was sold to parties 
connected with the Fair for three thousand dollars, whereupon he telegraphed 
at once to the Commissioners of the Fair offering five thousand dollars for it, 
and is confident that if his offer had been accepted at that time that he could 
have cleared a hundred thousand dollars by the operation. The offer was not 
accepted, and six months afterward they wrote him to hnoxo hoio they could 
make some money out of the thing. But the golden moment had passed, and 
his offer was not renewed. 

Mr. Shaw's business enterprises and engagements have long been of the 
most extensive and responsible character, and it is a source of much astonish- 
ment, even to those best acquainted with him, that he can transact so much 
business, with all its complicated relations, without apparent jar or difficulty. 
The remarkable faculty, however, possessed but by very few, but which he 
has in such perfection, of abstracting himself from the work immediately in 
hand, no matter how engrossing, and concentrating his energies upon the de- 
tails of some entirely different subject, enables him to execute an amount of 
business entirely beyond the capacity of ordinary men. 

He is President of the Shaw & Clark Sewing-Macliino Comjiany, with 
three hundred thousand dollars capital, a corporation employing a large num- 
ber of hands, and doing a veiy extensive business; also, President of the Ne 
Plus Ultra Collar Company, with tAvo hundred thousand dollars cai)ital; also, 
President of the Everett Sewing-Maclune Company, with one hundred thou- 
sand dollars capital ; also. General Agent for the Chicopee Sewing-Machine 
Company, with two hundred thousand dollars capital. He also established 
the Hinkley Knitting-Machine Comi)any, with two hundred thousand dollars 
capital, and is the manager of tlie various foreign companies o|)erating under 
the Hinkley patents, being formerly the exclusive owner of the invention, 
both here and abroad. In addition to being a Director in several other cor- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 65 

porations, in wliicli lie is largely interested, he is also managing agent and 
attorney of the Union Paper-Collar Company, of 'Now York, with a capital 
of three million dollars, and having mider its control all of the legitimate 
paper-collar manufacturers in the country, consisting of twenty different cor- 
porations, ranging in capital from one hundred thousand dollars to five hun- 
dred thousand dollars each. Besides all of this, he has under his direction 
^nd supervision over one hundred important suits at law and in equity in the 
United States Courts, enotigh, of itself, to overwhelm almost any ordinary 
mind, to say nothing of such minor matters as being pi-oprietor of a patent- 
medicine business, conducting four large advertising establishments for fur- 
nishing agents' supplies, managing a first-class insurance agency, which he 
established to avail himself of low rates in insuring his own jaroperty, and at- 
tending to his real estate, with other matters too numerous to mention, which 
are either directly or indirectly in his charge. 

In the fall of 1867, Mr. Shaw purchased the Maine Democrat newspa})er, 
which had been published for nearly forty years in the city of Saco, in his 
State, and removed it to Biddeford, erecting for it probably the most complete 
country newspaper printing establishment in Kew England, at an expense of 
nearly twenty-five thousand dollars. In January, 1868, he also commenced the 
publication of the Daily Evening Times^ constructing a telegraph at his own 
expense to furnish the Associated Press news, but as the advertising patronage 
for such a sheet was not sufficient to warrant the enterprise discontinued it in 
the same manner in which it was started — on his own responsibility. 

Notwithstanding all of this, however, he finds time to contribute, under 
a well-known 7iom de plmne^ to some of the leading magazines and papers of 
the day, with ample leisure to spare for recreation ! 

Mr. Shaw has served two terms as Mayor of Biddeford, Me., proving 
a most efficient officer and very popular with all parties. His inaugural ad- 
dresses, extracts from which have been extensively copied by the 2:>ress, ex- 
hibit a thorough knowledge of national as well as municipal affairs, and treat 
in a masterly manner the various subjects discussed. He has also rejjresented 
his city in the Legislature of the State with marked ability, at once taking 
the lead of his party, which, although in a minority, by his shrewd manage- 
ment and the liberality of his course in relation to all matters of general in- 
terest, enabled him to hold the balance of power and secure the passage of 
many important measures which would otherwise have been lost. As a 
speaker, he is above the average, being ready in debate, quick to analyze the 
subject at issue, logical and convincing in his arguments, and with experience 
would readily become distinguished as an orator. As a writer of both prose 
and poetry he early acquired much distinction, but the absorbing cares ot 
business have prevented the exercise of a faculty which he undoubtedly pos- 
sesses in more than ordinary perfection. His treatises on the various manu- 
factures and arts evince much talent, as do also his political and statistical 
writings; his paper on our frontier and sea-coast defenses, considered in con- 
nection with the strength of the maritime nations of Europe, and their policy 
towards us, being the most exhaustive and elaborate of any production on the 
subject, and replete with a vast amount of valuable statistical information, as 
5 



66 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

well :is exhibiting a thorough knowledge of history, political economy, and 
the fun(hiniental principles of constitutional government. 

Mr. Shaw has twice been a candidate for State Treasurer, and at the last 
Congressional election was the candidate of the Democrats and Conservative 
Republicans for Member of Congress from Mr. Fessenden's district. 

He was Commissioner from Maine to the Paris Exposition, in which he 
took great interest, having been appointed by the imanimous request of all 
parties, as peculiarly adapted for the position. He was also appointed, by 
President Johnson, Consul-General to Russia, one of the most important and 
lucrative foreign offices under government, but declined to accept the position 
on account of his numerous and pressing business engagements. 

Mr. Shaw is pre-eminently a self-made man, whatever he has acquired or 
become having been solely by his own unaided exertions, his life presenting 
one of the most striking illustrations of what can be accomplished by the 
proper exercise of integrity, energy, and perseverance. His calm, indomitable 
force of will is, perhaps, the most striking peculiarity of his character. The 
greatest difficulties neither embarrass nor intimidate him, and his invincible 
determination and untiring perseverance overcome all obstacles, however 
great. He has a very large share of that rare attribute, common sense, hav- 
ing soimd discretion, a vigorous and rapid power of generalization, keen per- 
ception, with rapidity and force of analysis and a clearness of reasoning pos- 
sessed by but few. These, coupled with his originality, inexhaustible ac- 
tivity, integrity, and firmness in the execution of whatever he undertakes, 
form the principal constituents of his magnificent business character. He has 
rare powers of observation, nothing ever escaping his notice, while his per- 
ception of human nature is intuitive, reading men at a glance as he would an 
open book. He is what may be termed a natural leader, strongly impressing 
his character upon those around him, and swaying and controlling men by 
sheer force of will. His word is his bond, and punctuality a rule of his life ; 
he is never a moment late, and has no patience with those who are. One of 
the most noted features of his character, however, is his extreme benevolence, 
which lias Ijccome almost proverbial. Possessing ample means, he contributes 
witli a most liberal hand to every good work, es])ecially to the aid of those 
less favored than himself In fact, generosity is so thoroughly a part of his 
nature that he attributes everything else to it, even his success, enjoying noth- 
ing which cannot be shared with others. 

Mr. Shaw has traveled and seen much, both of his own country and of 
Eui-ope, and his experiences with the world, its pleasures, cares, troubles, and 
resi)onsibilities have already far exceeded what usually falls to the lot of most 
men. His acquaintance is very extensive, and among his intimate friends he 
probably numl)ers as many personages of note as any man living. 

In stature he is five feet eleven inches in height, of good form, ami wi'ighs 
about one hundred and seventy-five pounds. His hair and complexion are 
light, eyes gray, his features being what would be called Jiomcli/, but all indi- 
cating great strength and force of character. In habits he is strictly temper- 
ate, of robust health, with a strong constitution capable of the greatest en- 
durance, his principal danger in this respect lying in overworking both mind 
and body; l)ut Avith a propei- regai'd for health, being yet many years below 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 



(!7 



tin- pi-ime of manliood, lie is capaMe of uttaiiiiiig tlic highest position in what- 
soever sphere he may devote his energies. 

For many years Mr. Shaw has been one of the most extensive and per- 
sistent of advertisers, being a firm believer in the vahie of printer's ink as a 
fertilizer for business soil. His advertisements frequently appear in over two 
thousand newspapers and magazines simultaneously, and he has always made 
it a rule to advertise most extensively in the dullest times — a rule many other 
business men could profit in by adopting. 



Newspaper Testimony.— A good advertising agency is mutually 
advantageous to advertiser and pnblishei:— {Coos Re]?.) The compensation 
allowed them is not more than a fair equivalent for the labor of procuring 
and the risk of guaranteeing the pay from the various parties for whom they 
advertise. — (Aroostook Pioneer.) Parties wishing to advertise can contract 
their business with them as safely as with the publishers themselves. — 
{Hampshire Exjyress.) After many years' experience we are prepared to 
recognize the system as a good one. — {Gloucester Telegraph.) We have very 
much preferred to pay commissions to such agents than bother ourselves and 
our patrons in those cities with the details of each individual case. We 
always regard them as partners in h\\%\nQ&%.— {Portsmouth Chronicle.) 
We consider the agency plan the best, both for advertiser and publisher, 
where they are strangers to each other, as being the safest, and causing less 
anxiety and trouble as to whether the parties on either side are good and 
responsible, and will carry out their contracts in good faith. — {Dover 
(xazette.) 



Advertising Agencies.— The importance of advertising cannot be 
over-estimated, nor is it necessary to reiterate arguments in support of its 
advantages. The success of merchants and business men generally who 
have done so, systematically and judicially, are so many evidences in its 
behalf Like any other business, however, it requires a study of utility and 
method to enable one to make the application of means to the end which 
IS desii-ed. It is in itself a science, and one which demands application and 
practical sense to acquire to advantage. This is thoroughly understood at 
the North, where advertising agencies have been in successful operation for 
very many years, and to these the business men of that section resort as the 
most economical and efl:ectual agents for the extension of their commercial 
transactions. 

Among those we can cordially endorse as thoroughly reliable, prompt, 
and attentive to the interests of their patrons, we offer the names of 
Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., of New Y ov\i.— (Jharleston Courier. 



JOSEPH H. 8C1JENCK. 



Adopting tiie significant Indian term great medicine man for one skilled 
in the healing art, why should it not be applied to Dr. Joseph H. Schenck, of 
Philadelphia, inventor of the Mandrake Pills, Sea-Weed Tonic, and Pulmonic 
Syrup ? Dr. Schenck, like the celebrated Dr. Jayne, now deceased, is a native 
of the State of New Jersey. He served an apprenticeship to the tailoring 
trade and started in business as such in Trenton, N. J. But he soon became 
satisfied that his mission was neither to clothe the naked nor to feed the 
hungry, but to alleviate suffering humanity, and after divers experiments — 
nothing in the Avay of the black art, of course — he produced his famous 
medicines, to the virtues of which he has scores of certificates from all classes 
and condition of people. Having reached the point that he aimed at, the 
next thing was to apprise the people generally that there was " balm in 
Gilead," and where, and at what price, it could be obtained. This was not so 
easy a matter, inasmuch as it would necessarily involve a considerable outlay, 
far beyond the doctor's limited means. He at first sought a i)artner with 
cash enough to aid him in the humane work, but was unable to succeed, and 
finally he resolved to go ahead, " sink or swim, survive or perisli." Those 
who have the pleasure of a personal acquaintance M'ith him know that he 
possesses indomitable pluck and an unflagging energy. With him there is no 
such word as fail, and the result shows that he did not miscalculate the great 
advantages of newspaper advertising. Had he been content to buy his 
molasses by the (piart and his ipecac by the half pound, and in his innate 
modesty have hid himself behind a sign with lettering so small that Mrs. 
Partington would tummI her double magnetizing spectacles to make them out, 
humanity would li.ivc been the sufferer, and Dr. Schenck would not to-day be 
the possessor of a beautiful country seat, and have his carriages and horses, 
his steam yachts and all that sort of thing. 

Looking back over a space of thirty years, to tlie luiinbli' pi-riod when 
the Seaweed Tonic was prepared in a solitary barrel, .uid now gazing upon 
the magnificent manufactory, where it and tlic otlici- ai-liclcs are made in 
almost endless (juantities, he may well i'wl proud of the results of persevi'r- 
ance and fair trading. 

As the leading tonic of the day, the Seaweed stands without a rival. 
'J'he large building which, even Jiow, in ari-hitectui-;d beauty and attraction 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 69 

equals anytliing else in the City of Brotherly Love has become too confined, 
and the next spring will see erected on the north-east corner of Sixth and 
Arch streets a marble building for the carrying on of his immense trade, 
eclipsing in magnificence all other stores. 

In his laboratory every improvement known to modern science is em- 
ployed, and the steam machine, with eccentric drum, for the exclusive manu- 
facture of the Mandrake Pills, is a curiosity of mechanical dexterity for 
lightening the labor of man. 

In giving the history of a fortune thus successfully built up, it will not 
be out of place to inquire into the manner of using so great an estate ; 
whether the long years of accumulation have dried up the higher qualities of 
the mind, or whether a liberal employment of the gifts of Fortune show that 
the blind goddess has for once bestowed it where it Avill be worthily used. 
Dr. Schenck has, at Schenck's Station, fifteen miles from Philadelphia, and on 
the railroad leading from Philadelphia to New York, built himself a country 
residence, or summer retreat, which he has surrounded and filled with all the 
luxuries of art and nature which make the chief blessings of life. It is one 
of the finest residences near the Delaware, erected at a cost of fifty thousand 
dollars, and surrounded by a farm of some three hundred acres, in a magnifi- 
cent state of cultivation. The situation is picturesque, the location healthy, 
and here the successful man of business, in the bosom of an amiable family, 
enjoys his otium cum dignitate, proudly conscious that he owes all to his own 
energies. The whole place reveals the man of wealth, refined by culture and 
fine taste. Conservatories, in which are treasured all the rarities of Flora, 
both of temperate and torrid zones; a garden which Adam, in his innocence, 
might have coveted ; barns, stables, buildings, and agricultural machinery of 
the most approved style, fine horses, unexceptionable carriages, and stock of 
the most expensive breeds — the whole superintended by the best gardener, 
the best coachman, and the best farming steward in the United States. The 
farm is within a ring fence, and the different lots are separated by the most 
approved fences. The whole is so beautifully tilled and free from weeds as 
to lie before the parlor windows a map of beauty and care. On the river 
liard by rides like a swan a splendid yacht, of which he is himself captain, 
and can steer to a miracle. On a low portion of the ground he contemplates 
making a private fish-pond, which will add much to the attractiveness of the 
place. 

That the great success of Dr. Schenck is mainly due to the manner in 
which he has made his medicines known he is free to admit. Few men in 
this country have so extensively advertised as he has. From the Atlantic to 
the Pacific, and from the southern borders of Texas to our new possessions 
in the extreme north, he and his remedies are known and prized. Long ago he 
inscribed upon his banner the hope-inspiring words, Consiunjjtion can be cured, 
and his certificates, scores of them, well authenticated, seem to leave no room 
to doubt the truth of the declaration. The doctor makes no pretensions to 
extraordinary medical knowledge. He is not college-bred, he don't carry a 
big-headed stick, nor bridge his nose with gold spectacles to give him a wise 
look, nor does he cough and cry " Hem !" nor make use of Latin phrases, nor 
affect the Sir Oracle in anv manner or form. But he is a man of srood com- 



70 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

mon sense, and has a practical knowledge of wliat he professes, which is 
worth much more by tenfold than is to be gleaned from all medical books 
ever published. While your thoroughbred medicine man has been plodding 
on year after year, feeling the pulses of patients and writing Latin prescrip- 
tions, working hard and receiving but a scanty remuneration, often no doubt 
as much as they are worth, Dr. Schenck has by his pills and potions accpiired 
both fame and fortune. He is now classed among the rich men of Phila- 
delphia, far up in the scale; yet, with all the notoriety his tonics and his syrups 
have attained, he advertises as liberally as ever, well-knowing that it is 
necessary to keep their virtues before a suffering people. The doctor, like all 
business men, has had his misfortunes. A few years ago when he had a large 
and handsome depot for the storage and sale of his medicines, at the north- 
west corner of Sixth and Chestnut streets, a conflagration of a few hours 
swept away the whole stock and destroyed his elegantly fitted-up oflice. But 
lie was on his feet in a few days, not in the least disconcerted. 

In person, Dr. Schenck is tall, well-formed, and has a handsome intellec- 
tual face. It is one calculated to impress favorably all who are brought into 
contact with him. He married many years ago, and has an interesting family. 
That he enjoys the pleasures of this life his numerous friends well know. As 
a giver of liberal entertainments, a friend of struggling enterprise and of 
suffering humanity, he has a reputation that is worth more than silver and 
gold or precious stones. 



Geo. p. Kowkll & Co., 40 Park Row, New York, are advertising 
agents with whom we have been doing business for more than a year with 
great satisfaction to ourselves. It is a model business-house — prompt, 
prudent, honorable, obliging, liberal, and just. They give more for tlie 
money than any other house in the world, and we advise all our friends to 
deal with them. — City Itetn, Philadelphia, Jan. 29, 1S7(>. 



If you haven't business, advertise; if you have busiiu'ss, adverti.se. 
People go to places that are advertised, and they go by those that are not. 
A place that advertises is known to the world ; that which does not is only 
known to a few (li;it m;iy pass it. ;iiiil pretty much everybody does 
it);e latter. 



ELIAS HOWE. 



Elias Howe, the inventor of the sewing-machine, was born in 1819, at 
:Spencer, in Massachusetts, where his father was a father and miller. There 
was a grist-mill, a saw-mill, and a shingle-machine on the place ; bnt all of 
them together, with the aid of the farm, yielded but a slender revenue for a 
man blessed with eight children. It was a custom in that neighborhood, as 
in ISTew England generally, forty years ago, for families to carry on some kind 
of manufacture at which children could assist. At six years of age, Elias 
Howe worked with his brothers and sisters at sticking the wire teeth into 
strips of leather for " cards," used in the manufacture of cotton. As soon as 
he was old enough, he assisted upon the farm and in the mills, attending the 
district school in the winter months. He was of opinion that it Avas the rude 
and simple mills belonging to his father which gave his mind its bent towards 
machinery; but he could not remember that this bent was very decided, 
nor that he watched the operation of the mills with much attention to the 
mechanical principles involved. He was a careless, play-loving boy, and the 
first eleven years of his life passed without an event Avorth recording. At 
eleven he went to "live out" with a farmer of the neighborhood, intending to 
remain until he was twenty-one. A kind of inherited lameness rendered the 
hard work of a farmer's boy distressing to him, and, after trying it a year, he 
returned to his fither's house, and resumed his ])lace in the mills, where he 
continued until he was sixteen. 

One of his young friends, returning from Lowell about this time, gave 
him such a pleasing description of that famous town, that he was on fire to go 
thitlier. In 1835, with his parents' reluctant consent, he went to Lowell, and 
obtained a learner's place in a large manufactory of cotton machinery, where 
he remained until the crash of 1837 closed the mills of Lowell and sent him 
adrift, a seeker after work. He went to Cambridge, under the shadow of 
venerable Harvard. He found employment there in a large machine-shop, 
and was set at work upon the new hemp-carding machinery invented by Prof. 
Treadwell. His cousin, Nathaniel P. Banks, since Speaker of the House ot 
Representatives and Major-General, worked in the same shop and boarded in 
the same house with him. After working a few months at Cambridge, Elias 
Howe found employment more congenial in Boston, at the shop of Ari Davis. 

At twenty-one, being still a journeyman, earning nine dollars a Aveek, he 



72 THE MKN WHO ADVERTISE. 

married; and, in time, children eiune witli inconvenient frequency. Nine dol- 
lars is a fixed quantity, or, rather, it was then; and the addition of three little 
mouths to be fed from it, and three little backs to be clothed by it, converted 
the vivacious father into a thoughtful and plodding citizen. His day's labor 
at this time, when he was upon heavy work, was so fiitiguing to him that, on 
reaching his home, he would sometimes be too exhausted to eat, and he would 
go to bed, longing, as we have heard him say, " to lie in bed for ever and ever."' 
It was the pressure of poverty and this extreme fatigue that caused him, 
about the year 1843, to set about the work of inventing the machine, which, 
he had heard four years before, " Avould be an independent fortune " to the in- 
ventor. Then it was that he caught the inventor's mania, which gives its 
victims no rest and no peace till they have accomplislu'd the work to which 
they have abandoned themselves. 

He wasted many months on a false scent. When he began to experi- 
ment, his only thought was to invent a machine which should do what he saw 
his wife doing when she sewed. He took it for granted that sewing must be 
that, and his first device was a needle pointed at both ends, with the eye in 
the middle, that should work uji and down through the cloth, and carry the 
thread though at each thrust. Hundreds of hours, by night and day, he 
brooded over this concejition, and cut many a basket of chips in the endeavor 
to make something that would work such a needle so as to form the common 
stitch. He could not do it. One day, in 1844, the thought flashed upon him,. 
Is it necessary that a machine should imitate the performance of the hand ? 
May there not be another stitch ? This was the crisis of the invention. The 
idea of using two threads, and forming a stitch by the aid of a shuttle and a 
curved needle with the eye near the point, soon occurred to him, and he felt 
that he had invented a sewLng-machine. It was in the month of October, 
1844, that he was able to convince himself, by a rough model of wood and 
wire, that such a machine as he had projected would sew. 

At this time he had ceased to be a journeyman mechanic. His father had 
removed to Cambridge to establish a machine for cutting palm-leaf into strips 
for hats — a machine invented by a brother of the elder Howe. Father and 
son were living in the same house, into the garret of which the son had put a 
lathe and a few machinist's tools, and was doing a little work on his own ac- 
count. His ardor in the work of invention robbed him, however, of many 
hours that might have been employed, his friends thought, to better advan-' 
tage by the father of a family. He was extremely poor, and his father had 
lost his i)alm-leaf machine by a fire. With an invention in his head that has 
since given him more than two hundred thousand dollars in a single year, and 
which is now yielding a profit to more than one firm of a thousand dollars a 
(l;iy. lie could scaiccly provide for his little family the necessaries of life. 
Nor c<juhl his invention be tested, except by making a machine of .steel and 
iron, with the exactness and finish of a clock. At the present time, with a 
n.achine before liim for a model, a good meclianic could not, with his oi-d'.nary 
tools, construci a scwitiu' iiiacliiiic in less than two niontlis, nor at a less ex- 
pense than three linndicil ddllais. Klias liowc li;iil only his model in Itis 
head, and he had not money cnou^■ll to pay t'oi- the raw materia! rniuisite tor 
the one inacliine. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 73 

There was living at Cambridge a young friend and schoolmate of the in- 
ventor, named George Fisher, a coal and wood merchant, who liad recently 
inherited some property, and was not disinclined to speculate with some of it. 
The two friends had been in the habit of conversing together upon the project 
of the sewing-machine. When the inventor had reached his final conception, 
in the fall of 1844, he succeeded in convincing George Fisher of its feasibility ^ 
which led to a partnership between them for bringing the invention into use. 
The terms of the partnership were these : George Fisher was to receive into 
his house Elias Howe and his family, board them while Elias was making the 
machine, give up his garret for a workshop, and provide money for material 
and tools to the extent of five hundred dollars ; in return for which he was to 
become the proprietor of one-half the patent, if the machine proved to be 
worth patenting. Early in December, 1844, Elias Howe moved into the 
house of George Fisher, set up his shop in the garret, gathered materials 
about him, and went to work. It was a very small, low garret, but it sufficed 
for one zealous brooding workman, who did not wish for gossiping visitors. 

All the winter of 1844-45 Mr. Howe worked at his machine. His con- 
ception of Avhat he intended to produce was so clear and complete that he 
was little delayed by failures, but worked on with almost as much certainty 
and steadiness as though he had a model before him. In April he sewed a 
seam by his machine. By the middle of May, 1845, he had completed his 
work. In July he sewed by his machine all the seams of two suits of woolen 
clothes, one suit for Mr. Fisher and the other for himself, the sewing of both 
of which outlasted the cloth. This first of all sewing-machines, after cross- 
ing the ocean many times, and figuring as a dumb but irrefutable witness in 
many a court, may still be seen at Mr. Howe's office in Broadway, where, 
within these few weeks, it has sewed seams in cloth at the rate of three liun- 
dred stitches a minu^te. It is agreed by all disinterested persons (Professor 
Renwick among others) who have examined this machine that Elias Howe, 
in making it, carried the invention of the sewing-machine farther on toward 
its complete and final utility than any other inventor has ever brought a 
first-rate invention at the first trial. It is a little thing, that first machine, 
which goes into a box of the capacity of about a cubic foot and a half Every 
contrivance in it has since been improved, and new devices have been added ; 
but no successful sewing-machine has ever been made, of all the seven hun- 
dred thousand now in existence, which does not contain some of the essential 
devices of this first attempt. 

Toward the close of 1850 we find him in New York, superintending the 
construction of fourteen sewing-machines at a shop in Gold street, adjoining 
which he had a small office, furnished with a five-dollar desk and two fifty- 
cent chairs. One of these machines was exhibited at the fair in Castle Gar- 
den in October, 1851, where, for the space of two weeks, it sewed gaiters, 
pantaloons, and other work. Several of them were sold to a boot-maker in 
Worcester, who used them for sewing boot-legs with perfect success. Two or 
three others were daily operated in Broadway, to the satisfaction of the pur- 
chasers. We can say, therefore, of Elias Howe, that besides inventing the 
sewing-machine, and besides making the first machine with his own hands, he 
brought his invention to the point of its successful employment in manufacture. 



'74 THE MEX WHO ADVERTISE. 

Whik' 1k' w :is thus engaged, events occurred which sei'iousiy threatened 
to rob him ot all tlie benefit of his invention. The infringers of his jjateut 
were not men of large mean.s nor of extraordinary energy, and they had no 
" case " whatever. There was the machine which Elias Howe had made in 
1845, there were his letters-patent, and all the sewing-machines then known 
to be in e.\i.stence were essentially the same as his. But in August, 1850, 
I.saac Men-itt Singer, a man of vast resources, joined the combination, having 
discovered a prior inventor to Howe, and gave him a great deal of trouble. 
.Singer's means becoming exhausted, however, he abandoned the contest, 
althoTigh always claiming that his contestant was not the rightful inventor, 
and consented to pay a royalty. 

In the year 185-1, after a long trial. Judge Sprague, of Massachusetts, de- 
cided that " the plaintiffs patent is valid, and the defendant's machine is an in- 
fringement." 

This decision was made when nine years had elapsed since the completion 
of the first machine, and when eight years of the term of the first patent had 
•expired. The patent, however, even then, was so little productive that the 
inventor, embarrassed as he was, was able upon the death of his partner, Mr. 
Bliss, to buy his share of it. He thus became, for the first time, the sole i)ro- 
prietor of his patent ; and this occurred just when it was about to yield a 
princely revenue. From a few hundreds a year, his income rapidly increased, 
until it went beyond tw^o hundred thousand dollars. By the time the exten- 
sion of the patent expired, Septembei- 10, 1867, the amount did not fall far 
short of the round two millions. It cost him, however, immense sums to de- 
fend his rights, and he was then very far from being the richest of the sew- 
ing-machine kings. He had the inconvenient reputation of being worth four 
millions, which was exactly ten times the value of his estate at the time of 
his death. 

The eminent success of this and other noted sewing-machines is largely 
owing to advertising. Take, for instance, the Howe Sewing-Machine Manu- 
factui-ing Company, which succeeded Elias Howe as the manufacturers of 
this combination of steel fingers and tireless muscles. Immense sums have 
been paid by them and their predecessor to the ])ublic press to keep the 
world informed about their machines. As their means have become larger, 
their success has been greater, and their expenses larger in periodicals. A 
large number of ephemeral newspapers have from time to time set forth the 
advantages of sewing-machines, and it is not too much to say that without the 
j)rinting press the next greatest mai'vcl of ci\ ili/.;ition would not hv known in 
one place where it is now in ten. 

By means of the various improvements :iii<l :itt:i(hiiu'uts. the sewing- 
machine now performs nearly all that the needle ever did. It seams, hems, 
tucks, binds, stitches, (piilts. gathers, fells, braids, embroiders, and makes 
button-holes. It is used in the mamitiicture of every garment worn by m;in, 
woman, or child. Fiiciiicirs caps, the engine-hose which tii-cnu'ii usi', sole- 
leather trunks, haiiu'ss. carriage curtains and linings, butl'alo-robes, horse- 
blankets, horse-collars, powder-flasks, mail-bags, sails, awnings, whips, sad- 
dles, corsets, hats, cajis, valises, pocket-books, trusses, suspenders, are among 
the articles made by its assistance ; but it is em]>loyed, quite as usefully, in 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 75 

making kid gloves, parasols, and tlie most delicate article of ladies' attire. 
.Some of our readers, perhaps, witnessed the show, two years ago in New 
York, of the shoes, gaiters, and ladies' hoots made for the Paris Exliiljition. 
They were of all degrees of delicacy, from the stout Balmoral to the boot of 
kid, satin, or velvet; and every kind of stitch had been employed in their 
manufacture. Some of the stitches were so fine that they could not be dis- 
tinctly seen without a magnifying-glass, and some were as coarse and strong 
as those of men's boots. The special wonder of this display was that every 
stitch in every one of those beautiful shoes was executed by the machine. 
Mr. E. C. Burt, who made this splendid contribution to the Exhibition, assured 
Mr. Parton, and assured the universe in general at Paris, that all this variety 
of elegant and durable work was performed on the " Howe Sewing-Machiiie." 
Upon ordinary boots and shoes, the machine has long been employed ; but it 
is only recently that any one has attempted to apply it to the manufacture ot 
those dainty things which ladies wear upon their feet when they go forth, 
armed cap-a-pie^ for conquest. A similar change has occurred in other branches 
of manufacture. As operators have increased in skill, and as the special 
capabilities of the different machines have been better understood, finer kinds 
of work have been done upon them than used to be thought possible. Some 
young ladies have developed a kind of genius for the sewing-machine. The 
apparatus has fascinated them ; they execute marvels upon it, as Gottschalk 
does upon the piano. One of the most recent applications of the machine is 
to the sewing of straw hats and bonnets. A Yankee in Connecticut has in- 
vented attachments by M^hich the finest braids are sewn into bonnets of any 
form. 

Elias Howe sold out in 1865, to a company largely composed of those 
who Avould naturally be his heirs. The company was then manutacturing ten 
machines a day, and their present product is now two hundred and fifty, and 
an addition is putting up that will enable them to furnish four hundred in 
the same time. Mr. Howe did not long survive the sale of his interest, as he 
died on the third of October, 1867, less than four weeks after the expiry of 
his patent. The sales amount to two millions and a half of dollars a year, 
and out of their machines twenty thousand a year are sold in foreign countries. 
The factory is at Bridgeport, Conn., and em])loys over eight hundred persons, 
and the salesroom is in Broadwav, New York. 



To Whom it May Concern. — I hereby certify that by caretul and 
extensive advertising I have, since the spring of 1863, increased my capital 
and business more than one hundred fold. — H. A. King, of the firm of 
H. A, King & Co., Publishers and Proprietors of the Beekeepers' Journal 
and National Agrk'uUurist, 37 Park Row, New York. 



PHINEAS T. BARNUM. 



The career of the Connecticut showman has been an extraordhiary one. 
Uniting a happy audacity of design with obstinacy in its execution, he has 
succeeded in amassing a handsome fortune out of ideas which would be pro- 
nounced impracticable by the rest of the world, and has made his name known 
as iar as the language is spoken. Frank in address and courteous in manner, 
he has deservedly been popular among those who frequent exhibitions, and 
the curious compound of philanthropic Christianity with the habitual deceit 
of a caterer to the element of wonder in mankind which Barnum shows is 
peculiar to himself. 

Phineas Taylor Barnum is the son of a typical Connecticut Yankee, 
who, from the predominance of hope over caution displayed in his organi- 
zation, never succeeded in amassing a fortune. He was born on the day 
succeeding the anniversary of independence, in the year 1810. All the edu- 
cation Barnum ever received was obtained in the common schools of Con- 
necticut, and it is recorded of him that at twelve years of age he was counted 
apt and skillful at figures, although it does not seem that on his first visit to 
New York he had studied the currency tables, as he offered a woman -who 
kept a stall in the streets ten cents for two oranges which she had demanded 
foui-pence each for. She gravely assented, leaving the young orange eater 
to suppose that he had made two cents by the bargain, whereas, as the 
Yankee fonrpence Avas six cents, he lost two. Bargaining Mas, indeed, one 
of the delights of youth at that day, and Barnum sold cookies, gingerbread, 
and cherry rum to his schoolmates and the neighborhood before he was 
twelve years of age, and would, undoubtedly, have become a small Crcesus 
if his father had not kindly permitted him to pay for his own clothes. 

The first regular business the subject oi" our sketch was employed in Avas 
as clerk in a country store, which taught him the tendency to deceit in the 
human mind, and led him to keep a sharp look-out for frauds of all kinds. A 
wagon-load of oats would be found to be four or five bushels short, fieeees of 
wool would have stones in them, and bundles of rags would be filled in tlie 
interior with ashes or gravel. Trials of practical jokes would frequently 
occur, and the most ordinary exj)ression might contain a sell, so that Phineas 
had his wits fully employed. After being awhile in this situation, his father 
died, and he accepted another place in a store a short distance from home, 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. "7 

where he showed his admmistrative genius by organizing a lottery wliere most 
of the prizes should come from glass and defective and old tinware. The 
scheme spread like wildfire, and the store succeeded in getting rid of all 
their unsaleable articles. His employer going to Brooklyn, then only a vil- 
lage, he followed him, and at the age of seventeen was the buyer for the 
house in the New York marts. He received nothing but a salary, and, be- 
coming dissatisfied, left and opened a porter-house, which he soon sold out to 
good advantage, and then became a clerk to another liquor-dealer— all this, 
however, without himself drinking. 

In February, 1828, he returned home and opened a fruit and confectionery 
store on a capital of one hundred and twenty dollars. Fifty were used m 
fitting up the store, and the remaining seventy dollars purchased his stock in 
trade. He opened on the first Monday in May, general training day. The 
village was full of people who had been attracted by the doings, and the shop 
was full all day long. ^Sixty-three dollars were the day's receipts, and the 
stock seemed hardly diminished. Additional purchases increased the goods, 
and in the fall he added stewed oysters to the inducements. Lottery tickets 
were also sold on a commission of ten per cent., and as large numbers of 
them were then sold everywhere in New England considerable was made. 

Becoming attracted by a fair young tailoress, named Charity Hallett, 
whom he had escorted home one night, he married her at the age of nineteen, 
and to keep up his character for enterprise became an editor when scarce 
twenty-one. The Herald of Freedom was a success, so lar as influence and 
circulation were concerned, but the luckless editor was three times sued for 
libel and once imprisoned for sixty days. Comfortable provision was made 
for him in jail; the room was papered and carpeted, he lived well, his sub- 
scription list rapidly increased, and his leaving was celebrated as a festival by 
the citizens of the town. His crime had been stating that a prominent church 
member had "been guilty of taking usury from an orphan boy," and, although 
the substantial truth of the assertion was acknowledged by all, the old law 
maxim that the greater the truth the greater the libel was held to be good. 
The court-room in which he was convicted was the scene of the celebration. 
An ode written for the occasion was sung, an oration delivered, and several 
hundred gentlemen partook of a sumptuous dinner, followed by appropriate 
toasts and testimonials. A coach drawn by six horses was preceded by forty 
horsemen, and was followed by sixty carriages. Cannon were fired and music 
was played, and it was altogether a great triumph for Barnum. 

Although he had carried on quite an extensive business, yet there were 
so many los^'ses by running away, death, failing, and other similar ways, that 
when he closed up business in Bethel and removed to New York, which he 
did in 1834, there was very little for him to live upon, excepting such as might 
be derived from his agent for collections. In New York he had hoped to 
secure some position in a mercantile house, but could not. The Sun, which 
was then, as now, a great medium for advertising wants, was eagerly perused 
every day. There were many chances for going into business, but they were 
mostly patent life-pills or a self-acting mouse-trap. His wife opened a private 
boarding-house on Frankfort street, and Mr. Barnum finally bought an interest 
in a grocery store, and in the summer succeeding made his first entry as a 



78 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

showman. Joice Heth was the spocuhition. Mr. Coley Hartram. of Con- 
necticut, iul'ormed Barnuni that he had owned an interest in a remarkable old 
negro woman, Avho was one hundred and sixty years old, and had been the 
nurse of Gen. Washington. At this time (1835) she was on exhibition in 
Fliiladelphia, with papers authenticating her age and lier membership in the 
Baptist Church for one hundred and sixteen years. Satisfactoiy proof seem- 
ed to be offered as to why she had been forgotten so long. The remaining 
partner in her proprietorship being willing to sell, Barnum became the owner. 
Joice Heth, to use the words of the exhibitor, Avas certainly a remarkable 
curiosity, and she looked as if she might have been far older than her age as 
advertised. She was apparently in good health and spirits, but from age or 
disease, or both, was unable to change her position ; she could move one arm 
at will, but her lower limbs could not be straightened ; hei- left arm lay across 
her breast and she could not remove it; the fingers of her left hand 
were drawn do^\^l so as nearly to close it, and were fixed ; the nails on that 
hand were almost four inches long and extended above her wrist ; the nails 
on her lai'ge toes had groMu to the thickness of a quarter of an inch ; her 
head was covered with a thick bush of grey hair ; but she was toothless and 
totally blind, and her eyes had sunk so deeply in the sockets as to have dis- 
appeared altogether. 

The exhibition was successful, as every appliance of the pi"inter"s art was 
used to get people to think, and talk, and become curious and excited over 
and about the " rare spectacle." Posters, transparencies, advertisements, and 
newspaper paragraphs were employed regardless of expense, and the rooms 
Avere crowded continxially, netting much profit to the proprietor, until her 
death, Avhich occurred in the next February. Post-mortem examinations did 
not seem to indicate so great an age as had been assumed, but nothing is cer- 
tainly known aboi;t her. His second step in the show line was to exhibit an 
Italian juggler, and his third to engage as treasurer to a traveling circus. He 
afterwards continued in the itinerating line, going from one place to another, 
until the middle of 1841. 

Thirty years ago in New York there Avas, standing at the corner of Broad- 
Avay and Ann streets, Scuddervs American Museum — a collection of curiosities 
from every (juarter of the globe, and having everything from a turtle Aveigh- 
ino" fourteen hundred pounds to a curious tooth-pick. Halleck had sung its 
praises when his muse had some poetry to it, and it Avas altogether one of the 
institutions of the city. Mr. Scudder was dead, and the property Avas held in 
trust for his daughters, being valued at fifteen thousand dollars, and costing 
probably aboiit fifty thousand. Since his death it had been losing money, and 
the heirs were desirous of selling it. Barnum conceived the idea of buying 
it, and asked his friends their opinion. " You buy the American Museum :'" 
said one. " What do you intend buying it Avith ?" " Brass." replied lu-, " for 
silver and gold have I none." The Museum building then belonge-l to .Mr. 
Francis W. Olmsted, a retired merchant, to whom Barnum urote iiiilicating 
his desire to buy the collection, and saying tli;i1 altlKMigti lie IimI ho money, 
yei industry, combined with tact and experience, would, Iii' llionglit, i-nable 
him to meet every payment in time. lie therefore asked Mi-. Olmsted to 
purcliase tlie ^Fuseum in his own name: to give him a writing securing it to 



THE mp:n who advertise. to- 

Banium, provided he made the payments })unetiially, iiichiding rent, and to 
allow twelve and a half dollars a week for the support of his family. There 
was also a forfeiture clause. In reply to this letter, Mr. Olmsted named an 
hour when Barnura could call on him, and inquired as to his habits and ante- 
cedents. As to references, he had several prominent theatrical and cii'cus 
men, and Mr. Moses Y. Beach, of the New York tSun. Some of these gen- 
tlemen called on Mr. Olmsted the next day, and spoke well of the showman, 
and an agreement was entered into by which the property was to be bought 
by the owner of the building, an accountant and ticket-taker was to be paid 
by Barnum, and the whole building was also leased by him at an aggregate 
rent of $3,000 a year. On seeing Mr. John Heath, the administrator of the 
estate, a bargain was struck for $12,000, payable in seven yearly installments. 
The day M^as appointed to draw and sign the writings, and all parties ap- 
peared, when Mr. Heath announced that he must decline any further action, 
as he had sold the collection to Peale's Museum, which had then consider- 
able reputation, for $15,000, and had received $1,000 as earnest. 

This was quite a blow to Barnum, who had confidently expected to obtain 
the collection, and he immediately took measures to inform himself as to 
whom the managers of the Museum were. They proved to be a party of 
speculators who had bought Peale's collection for a few thousand dollars, ex- 
pecting to join the American Museum with it, and then to sell stock to a suf- 
ficient extent to handsomely reimburse themselves. 

Barnum went immediately to several of the editors, including Major M. 
M. Noah, M. Y. Beach, and to West, Herrick, and Ropes, of the Atlas, and 
others, and stated his grievances. " Now," said he, " if you will give me the 
use of your columns, I'll blow that speculation sky-high." They all con- 
sented, and he wrote a large number of squibs, cautioning the public against 
buying the Museum stock, ridiculing the idea of a board of broken-down 
bank directors engaging in the exhibition of stuffed monkey and gander- 
skins ; appealing to the case of the Zoological Institute, which had failed by 
adopting such a plan as the one now proposed ; and finally told the public 
that such a speculation would be infinitely more ridiculous than Dickens's 
" Grand United Metropolitan Hot Muffin and Crumpet-Baking and Punctual 
Delivery Company." 

The stock was as " dead as a herring !" He then went to Mr. Heath and 
asked him when the directors were to pay the other fourteen thousand dol- 
lars. " On the 26th day of December, or forfeit the one thousand dollars 
already paid," was the reply. He was assured that they would never pay it, 
that they could not raise it, and that he would ultimately find himself with 
the Museum collection on his hands, and if once Barnum started oti" with an 
exhibition for the South he would not touch the Museum at any price. 
" Now," said he, " if you will agree with me confidentially, that in case these 
gentlemen do not pay you on the 26th of December, I may have it on the 
27th for twelve thousand dollars, I will run the risk, and wait in this city until 
that date." He readily agreed to the proposition, but said he was sure they 
would not forfeit their one thousand dollai-s. 

" Very well," said Barniim ; " all I ask of you is that this arrangement 
shall not be mentioned." He assented. " On the 27th day of December, at 



80 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

ten o'clock A. M., I wish you to meet me in Mr. Olmsted's apartments, pre- 
pared to sign the writings, provided this incorporated company do not pay 
you the fourteen thousand on the :26th." He agreed to this, and by request 
put it in writing. 

To outside parties, then, Barnum remarked that he had lost tlie Museum. 
In the meanwhile he continued his newspaper squibs at the company, which 
could not sell a dollar of its stock. On the appointed day the money was not 
paid, and Barnum became the proprietor, and his first act was to place the 
Directors and President of the Company on his free list. They were very 
angry, but could do nothing, and Barnum bent his energies to the building up 
and successful conduct of his enterprise, dining in the Museum oif bread and 
cheese, and working night and day. The Museum was, even in Scudder's 
day, worth the twenty-five cents charged twice over, and it was speedily much 
increased. In 1842 Peale's Museum was added, and in 1850 another large 
collection was obtained, and during all Barnum's long connection with it ad- 
ditional curiosities were secured. The result of the frugality and enterprise 
displayed by the manager was that in a year the entire museum was paid for 
out of its surplus earnings. The attractions were constantly varying — edu- 
cated dogs, fat women, dwarfs and giants, industrious fleas, albinos, ventrilo- 
quists, automatons, panoramas, singing, dancing, pantomime, and theatrical 
performances being a few. 

While he expended money liberally for attractions for the inside of his 
Museum, and bought or hired everything curious or rare which was offered 
or could be found, he was prodigal in his outlays to arrest or arouse public 
attention. When he became proprietor of the establishment, there were 
only the words " American Museum," to indicate the character of the con- 
cern ; there was no bustle or activity about the place ; no posters to announce 
what was to be seen ; the whole exterior was as dead as the skeletons and 
stuffed skins within. His experiences had taught him the advantages of 
advertising. He printed whole columns in the papers, setting forth the won- 
ders of his establishment. Old " fogies " opened their eyes in amazement at 
a man who could expend hundreds of dollars in annoiancing a show of 
^' stuff'ed monkey skins;" ])ut these same old fogies paid their quarters, nev- 
ertheless, and when they saw the curiosities and novelties in the Museum 
halls, they, like all other visitors, were astonished as well as pleased, and went 
home and told tlieir friends and neighbors, and thus assisted in advertising his 
business. He says : 

" It will be seen that very much of the success which attended my many 
years' proprietorship of the American Museum was due to advertising, and 
especially to my odd methods of advertising. Always claiming that I had 
curiosities worth showing and worth seeing, and exhibited ' dog cheap ' at 
Hwenty-five cents admission, children half price' — I studied ways to arrest 
public attention; to startle, to make peo])Ie talk and wonder; in short, to let 
the world know that I had a Museum." 

One of the hai)])iest hits ever made by Barnum was the engagement of 
General Tom Thumb, who was found by the showman in Bridgeport, Conn. 
He was then only five years old, was less than two feet high, and weighed 
about sixteen pounds. Under tlie acute management of the manager of the 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 81 

Museum he was made to appear eleven years of age, and was placarded as 
the smallest dwarf ever known. The exhiliition was very successful in 
America, and a year or two after Tom was taken to England, where all the 
^rts of advertising were brought into requisition. A brief engagement was 
made with the Princess's Theatre, the General was invited into the houses of 
Baron Rothschild and others of the nobility, and the Queen gave a private 
interview. The money coined in England was very great, and subse- 
<]uently as profitable tours were taken in France and Germany. 

As we descend later in time, we find accounts of the Jenny Lind excite- 
ment. Nothing similar to it had ever been known before, and it will prob- 
ably never happen again. The enthusiasm was tremendous. Seats sold for 
prices for which a house might be obtained, the pleasure of the people who 
-attended was unbounded, and the golden stream of wealth flowed unceasingly 
into the treasury of Barnum. Her fame was great before she arrived here, 
but the impressai'io had forestalled public opinion ; the press was filled for 
months previous with descriptions of Jenny, her goodness, her benevolence, 
and the unaffected simplicity of her manners, and the qualities of her voice, 
one of the most sympathetic and flexible ever known, were expatiated upon 
by the editors, who seemed to have gone mad. Pictures were to be found in 
every shop window, and every apprentice and shop-girl knew all the pai'ticu- 
lars of the career of the Swedish nightingale. Advertisements were inserted 
everywhere, and nothing was left unattempted to cause a general intoxication 
of the public mind. For weeks after her arrival in America the ex- 
citement was unabated. Her rooms were thronged by visitors, including 
the magnates of the land in both Church and State. The carriages of the 
wealthiest citizens could be seen in front of her hotel at nearly all hours of 
the day, and it was with some difficulty that Barnum prevented the " fashion- 
ables " from monopolizing her altogether, and thus, as he believed, sadly 
marring his interests by cutting her off from the warm sympathies she had 
awakened among the masses. Presents of alF sorts were showered upon her. 
Milliners, mantua-makers, and shopkeepers vied with each other in calling her 
attention to their wares, of which they sent her many valuable specimens, de- 
lighted if, in return, they could receive her autograph acknowledgment. 
Songs, quadrilles, and polkas were dedicated to her, and poets sung in her 
praise. We had Jenny Lind gloves, Jenny Lind bonnets, Jenny Lind riding 
hats, Jenny Lind shawls, mantillas, robes, chairs, sofas, pianos — in fact, every- 
thing was Jenny Lind. Her movements were constantly watched, and the 
moment her carriage appeared at the door it was surrounded by multitudes, 
eager to catch a glimpse of the Swedish nightingale. 

This was the luckiest hit of Barnum's genius. Three-quarters of a mil- 
lion of dollars were received by the troupe, and the profits were probably not 
less than a quarter of a million for Barnum, and Jenny's were one hundred 
and seventy-six thousand. It was all obtained in ninety-five concerts, and 
shows conclusively the eagerness of the American public to hear the songstress. 

Among other undertakings of Barnum were plowing by elephants in 
Connecticut, the Crystal Palace of New York, Phillips's Annihilator, and the 
Illustrated Wews. In fact, he was engaged in so many enterprises that it is 
6 



82 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

difficult to follow them. But among these there was an unlucky connection 
with the Jerome Clock Company, which succeeded in bankrupting the show- 
man, and compelled him almost to commence anew. In the course of time, 
however, he built up another fortune, and has succeeded in retaining it, spite of 
the destruction of his Museum twice by fire, and other accidents by flood and 
field. During the period of his adversity he exhibited the little General in 
Europe, among other enterprises, and also lectured on the Art of Money- 
Getting. This is one of the most instructive and entertaining business dis- 
courses ever given to a public audience. It may be summed up in a few con- 
densed sentences : Don't drink ; don't be above your business ; don't mistake 
your vocation ; select the right location ; avoid debt ; persevere ; whatever 
you do, do with all your might ; depend upon your own personal exertions ; 
use the best tools ; don't get above your business ; don't scatter your powers ; 
be systematic ; read the newspapers ; beware of outside operations ; don't in- 
dorse without good security ; advertise your business ; be polite and kind to 
your customers; be charitable; don't tell what you are going to do; and pre- 
serve your integrity. In advertising Mr. Barnum gives some weighty advice, 
which we extract : 

" Advertise Youu Busixess. — We all depend, more or less, upon the 
public for our support. We all trade with the public — lawyers, doctors, 
shoemakers, artists, blacksmiths, showmen, opera-singers, railroad presidents, 
and college professors. Those who deal with the public must be careful that 
their goods are valuable ; that they are genuine and will give satisfaction- 
When you get an article which you know is going to please your customers, 
and that, when they have tried it, they will feel they have got their money's 
worth, then let the fact be known that you have got it. Be careful to adver- 
tise in some shape or other, because it is evident that if a man has ever so 
good an article for sale, and nobody knows it, it will bring him no return. 
In a country like this, where nearly everybody reads, and where newspapers 
are issued and circulated in editions of five thousand to two hundred 
thousand, it would be very unwise if this channel was not taken advantage of 
to reach the public in advertising. A newspaper goes into the family and is 
read by wife and children, as well as the head ol' the house ; hence hundreds 
and thousands of people may read your advertisement, while you are attend- 
ing to your routine business. Many, perhaps, read it while you are asleep. 
The whole philosophy of life is, first ' sow,' then ' reap.' That is the way 
the farmer does; he plants his potatoes and corn, and sows his grain, and then 
goes about something else, and the time comes when he reaps. But he never 
reaps first and sows afterwards. This principle ai)plies to all kinds of busi- 
ness, and to nothing more eminently than to advertising. li' a man has a 
genuine article, there is no way in which he can reap more advantageously 
than by 'sowing' to the public in this way. He must, of course, have a 
really goocl article, and one which will please his customers; anything 
sjturious will not succeed permanently, because the public is wiser than many 
imagine. Men and women are selfish, and we all prefer purchasing where we 
can get the most for our money; and we try to find out where we can most 
gurely do so. 

" You may advertise a spurious article, aud induce many [teople to call 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 83 

and buy it oucf, but they will denounce you as an impostor and s\\ iudler, and 
your business will gradually die out, and leave you poor. This is right. Few 
people can salely depend upon chance custom. You all need to have your 
customers return and purchase again. A man said to me, ' I have tried ad- 
vertising, and did not succeed; yet I have a good article.' 

'' I replied, • My friend, there may be exceptions to a general rule. But 
how do you advertise T 

" ' I put it in a w^eekly newspaper three times, and paid a dollar and a 
half for it.' 

" I replied : ' Sir, advertising is like learning — ' a little is a dangerous 
thing.' ' 

" A French w^riter says that ' the reader of a newspaper does not see the 
first insertion of an ordinary advertisement ; the second insertion he sees, but 
does not read ; the third insertion he reads ; the fourth insertion he looks at 
the price ; the fifth insertion he speaks of it to his wife ; the sixth insertion he 
is ready to purchase, and the seventh insertion he purchases.' Your object 
in advertising is to make the public understand what you have got to sell, 
and if you have not the pluck to keep advertising, until you have imparted 
that information, all the money you have spent is lost. You are like the fel- 
low who told the gentlemen if he would give him ten cents it would save 
him a dollar. ' How can I help you so much wdth so small a sum ?' asked the 
gentleman in surprise. 'I started out this morning' (hiccupped the fellow) 
' with the full determination to get drunk, and I have spent my only dollar to 
accomplish the object, and it has not quite done it. Ten cents' worth more 
of whiskey would just do it, and in this manner I should save the dollar 
already expended.' 

" So a man w^ho advertises at all must keep it up until the public know 
who and what he is, and what his business is, or else the money invested in 
advertising is lost. 

" 8ome men have a peculiar genius for writing a striking advertisement, 
one that will arrest the attention of the reader at first sight. This tact, of 
course, gives the advertiser a great advantage. Sometimes a man makes 
himself popular by an unique sign or a curious display in his window. Re- 
cently I observed a swing sign extending over the sidewalk in front of a 
store, on which was the inscription, 

' don't read the other side.' 

'' Of course I did, and so did everybody else, and I learned that the 
man had made an independence by first attracting the public to his business 
in that way and then using his customers well afterwards. 

" Genin, the hatter, bought the first Jenny Lind ticket at auction for two 
hundred and twenty-five dollars, because he knew it would be a good adver- 
tisement for him. ' Who is the bidder ?' said the auctioneer, as he knocked 
down that ticket at Castle Garden. ' Genin, the hatter,' was the response. 
Here were thousands of people from the Fifth Avenue, and from distant 
cities in the highest stations in life. ' Who is Genin, the hatter ?' they ex- 
claimed. They had never heard of him before. The next morning the news- 
papers and telegraph had circulated the facts from Maine to Texas, and from 
five to ten millions ol people had read that the tickets sold at auction for 



84 THE MEN WHO xVDVERTISE. 

Jenuy Lind's first concert iimounted to about twenty tliousand dollars, and 
that a single ticket was sold at two hundred and twenty-tive dollars, to 
* Geuin, the hatter.' Men throughout the country involuntarily took ott' their 
hats to see if they had a 'Genin' hat on their heads. At a town in Iowa it 
Ava.s found that m the crowd around the post office there was one man who 
had a 'Genin' hat, and he showed it in triumph, although it Avas worn out 
and not worth two cents. ' Why,' one man exclaimed, ' you have a real 
'Genin' hat ; what a lucky fellow you are.' Another man said ' Hang on to that 
hat, it will be a valuable heir-loom in your family.' Still another man in the 
crowd, who seemed to envy the possessor of this good fortune, said, ' Come, 
give us all a chance; put it up at auction !' He did so, and it was sold as a 
keepsake for nine dollars and fifty cents ! What was the consequence to 
Mr. Genin ? He sold ten thousand extra hats per annum, the first six years. 
Nine-tenths of the purchasers bought of him, probably, out of curiosity, and 
many of them, finding that he gave them an equivalent for their money, be- 
came his regular customers. This novel advertisement first struck their 
.attention, and then, as he made a good article, they came again." 

The return to prosperity has not been succeeded by any fall. Stout and 
jovial, Barnum cracks his jokes as freely as of yore, and is as able to con- 
■ceive and carry out great enterprises as ever. The long succession of dwarfs 
.and giants, albinoes and fat women, no longer interest him, for he has retired 
from the Museum business, and devotes his time mostly to real estate and the 
care of his property. He has been a strict business man for the last twenty 
years, kind and generous in his charities, and a pleasant companion. He 
lives now during the winter season in New York, and has a country resi- 
dence near Bridgeport. An autobiography written in 1855, and materially re- 
vised, with additions, in 1869, is published by J. B. Burr & Co. of Hartford, 
And is a pleasant and entertaining book. 



With persistency almost anything can be accomplished. Advertismg 
•does not dift'er from other kinds of business in this. It needs to be done 
persistently. What would be thought of the farmer who simply put his grain 
in the giound and did nothing further ? He could not expect half what he 
might if the soil had been assiduously tilled. Just so in })ublicity. You 
desire it simply to make additional sales, and you think that if you have 
sown the good seed at one time that there has been enough done to last for 
an indefinite series of years. It is no more so than that grain sown one year 
will be pi-oductive next. True, there may be grains shaken down which by 
accident shall germinate and bring forth fruit; but how little! To obtain a 
heavy crop, plant every year; to increase your business by advertising, 
advertise often, 



T. B. PETERSON. 



The career of T. B. Peterson, bookseller and publisher, may be studied 
with pleasure and profit. He is a practical printer, and thirty years ago was 
foreman in the office of George R. Graham, a leading newspaper and maga- 
zine publisher of that period. Mr. Graham published the Gasket, a monthly 
periodical, which had for its contributors a number of the prominent writers 
of the day, including C. J. Peterson, a brother of the subject of our sketch. 
The Gasket was only published for a year or two under that title, after which 
Mr. Graham bought Bwtwi's Gentleman^s Magazine, and, uniting it with the 
Gasket, published the monthly under the name of Graham^s Lady's and 
Gentleman's Magazine, the first number of which was issued in 1841. In this 
periodical appeared the first mezzotint engravings executed in this country. 
Mr. Graham drew around him a host of popular magazine writers, among 
them Edgar A. Poe, Jesse E. Dow, J. Ross Browne, T. Dunn English, 
Willis Gaylord Clark and Mrs. Esling, and the periodical soon acquired 
a very extended circulation. The success which attended Mr. Graham's ef- 
forts to furnish a first-class magazine induced him to embark in a new under- 
taking, and, purchasing three Philadelphia weeklies, the United States Ga- 
zette, Saturday Evening Post, and Saturday Ghronicle, he united them, and 
published an attractive sheet called the Saturday Evening Post and Ghronicle. 
The weekly, like the magazine, soon worked its way into public favor,, 
and Mr. Graham saw the road open before him to a reasonable amount 
of fame and fortune. It will be seen how the foreman in his printing office 
outstripped him in the race. The demand for the magazine, the new weekly, 
and for other publications, including the Brother Jonathan, issued from 
the press of Wilson & Co., of New York, which then had a deserved ])opu- 
larity, and with it Extras containing long stories, attaining a wide circulation, 
induced Mr. Peterson to try his hand as a dealer, and with a partner to attend 
to the selling department the new firm commenced business in a very small 
way. The field was not then imoccupied. Burgess, a popular New Yorker, 
had opened a newspaper and magazine depot at Third and Dock streets; 
Zeiber, a Philadelphian, had a shop within a stone's throw of it, and Peterson 
and his man Friday, nothing daunted, asked foi' and received a reasonable 
share of custom. The business, by close attention, increased, and in a few 
years Mr. Peterson commenced his career as a book publisher. ]\[ean while 



86 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

he had made himself known by liberally advertising his establishment, and 
his earliest publications, the works of George Lippard and Caroline Lee 
Ileutz, were extensively read. The Philadelphia jjublishers at that day were 
among the most eminent in the country. Lea & Blanchard, Carey & Hart, 
and J. Gregg were everywhere known. The first-named firm republished the 
early Avorks of Dickens, and it was not until some years after that Mr. Peter- 
son scattered them broadcast over the land, in both eheai) and costly editions, 
doing more probably for their wide circulation than any other publisher in 
the United States. Carey & Hart have the credit of having issued the most 
magnificent edition of Byron's Childe Harold that was ever published this side 
of the Atlantic, and T. B. Peterson may with justice claim the honor of 
issuing the largest number of editions of all the writings of Charles Dickens 
of any American bookman. There can be no doubt that much of the success 
of Mr. Peterson is to be credited to liberal advertising, by which he won the 
good opinion of newspaper publishers and received favorable notices from 
time to time. Some one has remarked in a spirit of satire that the best way 
to reach the heart of such is through their stomachs, meaning that a good 
dinner will of all things most readily secure his regard, but this is a mistake. 
It is true that he is not insensible to such influences. Where is the man who 
can lay his hand upon his heart and declare that he is ? A more certain and 
ready way, however, to make his sympathetic feelings all aglow, and bring a 
smile to his cheek, is to put money in his purse — to do it in a business way. 
And they who have used the columns of newspapers to make themselves and 
their trades and professions known are prepared to certify to the truth of 
what has been said. 

While T. B. Peterson was mounting up the ladder of prosperity, and at 
each step getting into a purer and more healthy business atmosphere, his 
employer, Mr. Graham, was gradually but surely going down. His maga- 
zine and newspaper both sunk in public estimation, and he finally gave them 
up, and opened an oflice as a broker. In this he was not successful. Several 
unfortunate speculations proved damaging to him, and but for the assistance 
of well-to-do friends and relatives he would have been completely wrecked. 
He died about eight or ten years ago. The business of T. B. Peterson &, 
Brothers was never more prosperous than at the present time. Their publica- 
tions are generally of a popular kind, and embrace the writings of many of 
the best authoi-s of this country and of England. They are not all the works 
of romance writers, but among tliem may be found standard educational and 
scientific productions. And all is the result of energy and tact, liberal adver- 
tising, and good management generally. Mr. Peterson is in the enjoyment of 
a handsome income, and he lives in a manner which shows a proper appre- 
ciation of the rational pleasures of life. He has a mansion on Broad street, 
commodious and elegant, he is a patron of the drama, is a general attendant 
at operatic performances, and he spends tlie summer months at one of the 
fashionaV)le seaside resorts. He is now a little on the shady side of fifty, yet 
he looks hale and vigorous, and (■a])able of enjoying the comforts and pleasure! 
of the world foi- uiimv years to come. 



E. C. ALLEN. 



Not a score of years ago, in a sraall towu in the State of Maine, was known 
a hard-working, hard-thinking youngster, whose ambition caused him to be 
dissatisfied with the small returns made from his father's rocky farm. His 
chance for schooling was not very good, but by improving every opportunity 
he managed to get a good education, and at the age of seventeen, against the 
advice of his friends, resolved to start out in the world for himself. We next 
hear of him as a common canvasser, peddling books, newspapers, etc., and it 
is said he never attempted to sell an article but what he made it go. Strict 
economy he had to observe to make the two ends meet, but where there is a 
will there is a way, and in the course of a year he had in his possession over 
one hundred dollars. He now resolved to employ an agent or two to can- 
vass for him. This plan, in his hands, worked very well, and he was soon in 
a prosperous business, and, had he been content with common things, would 
have settled down and taken things easily. As it was, he went mto the patent 
right business, and opened what he called a general agency ofiice, and ad- 
vertised to furnish agents with any book or other article sold by agents at 
the lowest wholesale price. Business came slow^ly, and it was found uphill 
work to pay expenses. Often he was on the point of giving up, but the 
never-give-up principle predominated, and carried him through. After two 
years' hard struggle, business began to pay expenses, and then began to come 
in with a rush, and to-day Mr. Allen has no reason to regret that he did not 
-give up to misfortune. He understood the secret of success at the start, 
and was hampered only by the lack of capital. Little money, little 
credit, it was uphill work to do business on a scale large enough to pay any- 
thing. The secret of his entire success was in judicious advertising. At the 
very start, when he was peddling single-handed, he made use of advertising 
in various ways. His posters were to be seen in the public places. A short 
reading-matter notice might be observed in the local papers. As business in- 
creased he enlarged his advertising, and when success arrived he did not for- 
get from whence it came. In less than six years from the time he first started, 
he was known as the largest advertiser for agents in America. The old 
business of furnishing agents with any article in the market is still continued, 
while various specialties are introduced and thousands of agents are profit- 
ably employed in all parts of the country. His advertisements may now be 



88 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

seen in every publication in the country. His advertising expenses alone are- 
over ten thousand dollars per month. Including postage and circulars, the 
entire advertising expenses will go hard on to fitteen thousand dollars per 
month for the Avinter months. To-day, Messrs. E. C. Allen & Co., of Au- 
gusta, Me., are domg the largest business of the kind ever done, and owe 
their success entirely to liberal advertising. "I will succeed," said Mr. 
Allen, at the start, and the will and the advertising did it. 

This firm gave to Geo. P. Kowell & Co. last fall an extraordinary con- 
tract for advertising. The agreement specified that the advertisement 
should go into every daily, weekly, semi-weekly, monthly or quarterly in 
the United States, and it has accordingly appeared in over four thousand 
five hundred periodicals. Ten thousand dollars were paid in hand before 
the appearance of a single notice. 



Advektisikg. — Publishers of newspapers should unite to fasten the 
conviction upon the public mind of discountenancing a certain system of pro- 
fessed advertising that is hurtful to them, and of no real service to business 
men. Let us give instances : A dealer is approached by some oily-gammon- 
person, who descants upon the advantage of ha\"ing his business card 
presented, with that of others, upon some sort of sheet, with a frame about 
it and an oidre picture in the centre. It is represented that great numbers 
of people look at these homely sheets attentively and constantly, and 
straightway go ofi" and purchase of the dealers whose names are on the slieet 
in question. The latter are often flattered into the belief that their names, 
thus so conspicuously posted, really attract great attention, and bring mar- 
vellous remuneration in the augmentation of their trade. If such a one will 
take the trouble of going to some leading hotel to ascertain how many per- 
sons look at the advertising sheet in question, he will find that scarce a man 
in a day does so. Yet twenty or thirty or fifty or a hundred dollars are 
sometimes thrown away yearly in this worthless style of advertising. The 
same amount paid to established newspapers of the best kind Avould infallibly 
bring thousands of dollars in additional sales. 

Much more may l)e said as to wasting money by advertising on bills of 
fare at hotels, just as if business people who resort to this city idle away val- 
uable time by long sittings at breakfasts and dinners at hotels. So of 
advertising on theatre or concert bills. People go to such places for 
pleasure. They, for the time, throw off thoughts of business. Besides, in 
the dim light between acts, the advertisements cannot be read. There are 
many other like forms of spurious advertising upon which, in the aggregate, 
a vast sum is cast to the winds or the waters by the business community 
yearly. — N'atioiial TntiJIigcmcer. 



ALEXANDER T. STEWART. 



In the year 1819, a European vessel anchored in the harbor of New 
York, after a long and weary voyage from the old world. She brought 
many passengers to the young metropolis, the most of whom came with 
the intention of seeking their fortunes in this land of promise. 

Among them was a young Irishman, who had left his humble home in 
his native county of Tyrone, in Ireland, to seek in America the means of 
bettering his condition. He Avas in his twenty-fourth year, having been 
born in 1795, and was possessed of a good education, backed by sound 
health and an indomitable determination to succeed. He was poor, how- 
ever, and when he landed in New York he was without friends. 

He had been educated with a view to entering the ministry, and his 
first effort after reaching New York .was to procure a school. He was 
successful to a certain extent, and for nearly three years taught a small 
number of pupils at No. 59 Rose street. 

School-teaching, however, did not suit him, though he managed to save 
some money from the proceeds of his labors. A relative in Europe died 
about this time and left him a small legacy, with which he determined to 
enter into business for himself, and in 1822, soon after the terrible epidemic 
of yellow fever that year, he established himself as a retail dry-goods 
merchant in a frame building on Broadway, just opposite where his present 
wholesale house stands. His entire cash capital was between twelve and 
fifteen hundred dollars, and the prospect before him was not inviting. His 
store was small, being only twenty-two feet wide by tAventy deep, and was 
situated next door to the then famous Bonafanti, who kept the most popular 
and best-known variety store of the day. 

About this time Mr. Stewart married Miss Cornelia Clinch, an estimable 
lady of New York, who is still living, and who proved a noble help-mate 
to him in his early struggles. The young couple lived in one small room 
over the store, and the wife took care of the domestic arrangements while 
the husband attended to his business below. 

Without mercantile experience, and possessing no advantage but his 
own unaided determination to succeed, Mr. Stewart stai'ted boldly on what 
proved the road to fortune. No young merchant ever worked harder than 
he. From fourteen to eighteen hours each day were given to his business. 



90 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

He was his own bouk-keeper, salesman, and porter. He could not attbrd to 
employ any help. Credit was hard to obtain in those days, and young 
merchants were not favorites Avith those who had such favors to bestow, and 
Mr. Stewart was one of the least favored, inasmuch as he Avas almost a total 
stranger to the business community in which he lived. He kept a small 
stock of goods on hand, which he purchased for cash chiefly at the auction 
sales. He was a regular attendant at these sales, and his purchases were 
invariably "sample lots" — that is, collections of small quantities of various 
articles thrown together in confusion, and sold in heaps for what they would 
bring. He had these purchases conveyed to his store, and after the business 
of the day was over he and his wife would take these " sample lots," and by 
carefully assorting them bring order out of the confusion. Every article 
was patiently gone over. Gloves were redressed and smoothed out, laces 
pressed free from the creases which careless bidders had twisted into them, 
and hose made to look as fresh as if they had never been handled. Each 
article, being good in itself, was thus restored to its original excellence. The 
goods were then arranged in their proper places on the shelves of the store, 
and by being offered at a lower price than that charged by retail dealers 
elsewhere in the city met with a ready sale. Even at this low price the 
profit was great, since they had been purchased for a mere trifle. For six 
years Mr. Stewart continued to conduct his business in this way, acquiring 
every day a larger and more profitable trade. 

It is said that when he entered upon his business he knew so little of 
the details of it that he was sometimes sorely embarrassed by occurrences 
insignificant in themselves. Upon one occasion he is said to have accosted 
the late William Beecher (li'om whom he bought many goods), as follows : 
"Mr. Beecher, a lady came into my store to-day and asked me to show her 
some hose. I did not know what the goods were, and told her I did not 
keep the article. What did she want y" Mr. Beecher quietly held up a pair 
of stockings before him, and Stewart, bursting into a laugh at his own sim- 
plicity, went l)ack to his store a wiser man. 

While still engaged in his first struggles in his little store, Mr. Stewart 
found himself called on to make arrangements to })ay a note which would 
soon become due. It was for a considerable sum, and he had neither the 
money nor the means of borrowing it. It was a time when the mercantile 
community of New York regarded a failure to pay a note as a crime, and 
when such a failure was sure to bring ruin to a new man. Mr. Stewart knew 
this, and felt that he must act with greater resolution and daring than he liad 
ever before exhibited, if he would save himself from dishonor. To meet the 
crisis he adopted a bold and skilli'ul manoeuvre. He marked down every 
article in his store far below the wholesale price. This done, he had a num- 
ber of handbills printed, announcing that he would sell off his entire stock 
of goods below cost, within a given time. He scattered these bills broad- 
oast through the city, and it was not long before purchasers began to flock 
to his store to secure the great bargains which his advertisements offered 
them. His terms were " cash," and he had little difficulty in selling. Pur- 
chasers found that they thus secured the best goods in the market at a lower 
figure than they had ever been offered before in New York, and each one 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 91 

was prompt to advise relatives and friends to avail themselves of the 
favorable opportunity. Customers were plentiful, the little Broadway store 
was thronged all day, and long before the expiration of the period he had 
tixed for the duration of his sales Mr. Stewart found his shelves empty and 
liis treasury full. He paid his note with a part of the money he had thus 
received, and with the rest laid in a fresh stock of goods. He was fortunate 
in his purchases at this time, for, as the market was extremely dull and i-eady 
money scarce, he, by paying cash, bought his goods at very low prices. 

The energy, industry, patience, and business tact displayed by Mr. 
Stewart these first year.s of his commercial life brought him their sure 
reward, and in 1828, just six years after commencing business, he found his 
little store too small and humble for the large and fashionable trade which 
had come to him. Three new stores had just been erected on Broadway, 
between Chambers and Warren streets, and he leased the smallest of these 
and moved into it. It was a modest building, only three stories high and 
thirty feet deep, but it was a great improvement on his original place. 
He was enabled to fill it with a larger and more attractive stock of goods, 
and his business was greatly benefited by the change. He remained in this 
store for four years, and in 1832 removed to a two-story building, located on 
Broadway between Murray and Warren streets. Soon after occupying it he 
was compelled by the growth of his business to add twenty feet to the 
depth of the store and to add a third story to the building. A year or two 
later a fourth story was added, and in 1837 a fifth story, so rapidly did he 
prosper. 

His trade was now with the wealthy and fashionable class of the city, 
and he had surmounted all his early difficulties and laid the foundations of 
that splendid fortune which he has since won. The majority of his cus- 
tomers were ladies, and he now resolved upon an expedient for increasing 
their number. He had noticed that ladies in "shopping" were much given 
to the babit of gossiping and even flirting with the clerks, and he adopted 
the expedient of employing as his salesmen the handsomest men he could 
procure — a practice which has since become common. The plan was suc- 
cessful from the first. Women came to his store in greater numbers than 
before, and "Stewart's nice young men" were the talk of the town. 

The great crisis of 1837 found Mr. Stewart a prosperous and rising 
man, and that terrible financial storm which wrecked so many of the best of 
the city firms did not so much as leave its mark on him. Indeed, while all 
other men were felling all around him, he was coining money. It had 
always been his habit to Avatch the market closely, in order to profit by any 
sudden change in it, and his keen sagacity enabled him to see the approach 
of the storm long before it burst, and to prepare for it. He at once marked 
down all his goods as low as possible, and began to " sell for cost," originat- 
ing the system which is now so popular. The prices were very low, and 
the goods of the best quality. Everybody complained of the hard times, 
and all were glad to save money by availing themselves of " Stewart's bar- 
gains.'' In this way he carried on a retail cash trade of five thousand dollars 
per day in the midst of the most terrible crisis the country had ever seen. 
Other merchants were reduced to every possible expedient, and were com- 



92 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

pelled to send their goods to auction to be sold for what they would brings 
so great was their need for ready money. SteAvart attended all these 
auctions regularly, and purchased the goods thus offered. These he sold 
rapidly, by means of his "cost system," realizing an average of forty per 
cent. It is said that he purchased fifty thousand dollars' worth of silks in 
this way, and sold the whole lot in a few days, making a profit of twenty 
thousand dollars on the transaction. In this way he not only passed through 
the " crisis," but made a fortune in the midst of it. 

From that time to the present day his course has been " onward and 
upward" to fortune. Nearly a quarter of a century ago he purchased the 
property which is now the site of his wholesale store, and commenced to 
erect the splendid marble warehouse w^hich he still occupies. His friends 
were surprised at his temerity. They told him it was too far up town, and 
on the wrong side of Broadway ; but he quietly informed them that a few 
years would vindicate his wisdom and see his store the centre of the most 
flourishing business neighborhood of New York. His predictions have been 
more than realized. 

He moved into his new store in 1848, and continued to expand and 
enlarge his business every year. Some years ago he purchased the old 
Ninth Street Dutch Church and the lots adjacent to it, comprising the entire 
block lying between Ninth and Tenth streets, Broadway and Fourth avenue. 
When he found the retail trade going up town, and deserting its old haimts 
below Canal street, he erected a fine iron building at the corner of Broad- 
M-.ij and Tenth street, to which he removed the retail department of his 
business, continuing his wholesale trade at his old store on Chambers street. 
This new "upper store" has increased with the business. The building will 
soon cover the entire block upon which it is erected, and is now^ the largest, 
most complete, and magnificent establishment of its kind in the world. 

Though he took no active part in politics, he was too much interested in 
public affairs, by reason of his immense wealth, not to watch them closely. 
He was satisfied, some time before hostilities began during the rebellion, that 
war must come, and quietly set to work and made contracts with nearly all 
the manufacturers for all their productions for a considerable period of time. 
Accordingly, when the war did come, it was found that nearly all the 
articles of clothing, blankets, etc., needed for the army had been monoplized 
by him, because the same goods could not be purchased elsewhere. His 
profits on these transactions amounted to many millions of dollars, though 
it should be remarked that his dealings with the government were charac- 
terized by an unusual degree of liberality. The gains thus realized by him 
more than counterbalanced his losses by the sudden cessation of his Southern 
trade. 

Fifty years have now passed away since the poor young school teacher 
landed in New York, and to-day he stands at the head of the mercantile 
interests of the New World. In the fifty years which have elapsed since 
then, he has won a fortune which is variously estimated at from twenty-five 
to forty millions of dollars. He has won all the wealth fairly — not by 
trickery, deceit, or even by a questionable honesty, but by a series of mer- 
cantile transactions, the minutest of which is open to the most rigid scrutiny. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 93 

and by a patience, energy, tact, industry, and genius of whicli few men are 
possessed. Surely it must be a proud thought to him that he has done all 
this himself, by his own imaided efforts, and that amidst all his wonderful 
success there does not rest one stain upon his good name as a man or a 
merchant. 

He is one of the hardest workers in his establishment. He has partners 
to assist him in carrying on liis immense business, but they are merely head 
clerks in the various departments and divide only the profits with him. He 
assumes the entire responsibility, and manages the entire trade of his firm, 
his partners acting merely as he directs. 

He goes to his business between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, 
stopping first at his upper store. He makes a brief but thorough inspection 
of this establishment, ascertaining its wants, and satisfying himself that all 
is going on properly, and then repairs to his lower store, where he remains 
until business hours are over, and returns home between five and six o'clock 
in the afternoon. He works hard, and is never absent from his post, unless 
detained by sickness. 

His time is valuable, and he is not willing to waste it ; therefore access 
to him is difficult. Many persons endeavor to see him merely to gratify 
their impertinent curiosity, and others wish to intrude upon him for purposes 
-which simply consume his time. To protect himself he has been compelled 
to resort to the following expedient : A gentleman is kept on guard near 
the main door of the store, whose duty it is to inquire the business of 
visitors. If the visitor urges that his business is private, he is told that Mr. 
Stewart has no private business. If he states his business to the satisfaction 
■of the " sentinel," he is allowed to go up stairs, where he is met by the confi- 
dential agent of the great merchant, to whom he must repeat the object of 
his visit. If this gentleman is satisfied, or cannot get rid of the visitor, he 
-enters the private ofiice of his employer and lays the case before him. If the 
business of the visitor is urgent he is admitted, otherwise an interview is 
refused him. If admitted the interview is brief and to the point. There is 
no time to be lost. Matters are dispatched with a method and promptitude 
which astonishes strangers. If the visitor attempts to draw the merchant 
into a friendly conversation, or indulges in useless complimentary phrases, 
after the business on which he has come is arranged, Mr. Stewart's manner 
instantly becomes cold and repelling, and troublesome persons are not unfre- 
quently given a hint to leave the room. This is his working-time and it is 
precious to him. He cannot afford to waste it upon idlers. 

Mr. Stewart is now seventy-four years old. He looks much younger, for 
he is as vigorous and active as a man of half his age. He is of the medium 
lieight, is thin, has sandy hair, sharp, well-cut features, a clear, bright eye, 
and a calm, thoughtful face. His manner is reserved, not to say cold. He 
dresses with scrupulous neatness, and in the style of the day. 

The recent events of his life, in connection with his magnificent bequest 
to the city of New York for homes for the working classes, and his nomina- 
tion as Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, are too fresh in the 
mind of the reader to need repetition here. 



D. D. T. MOOKE. 



Among the newspaper press of to-day agricultural journals hold an 
important place. They have come to be a recognized influence, widely felt. 
They reach a large mass of the people, and touch the interests of that mass 
more nearly than any other literature. The producers are really the back- 
bone of our social system ; and it is for these directly that agricultural 
journals cater. 

But recognized and successful as the agricultural press is at present, its 
history is comparatively brief. Less than twenty-five years ago there was 
not a weekly journal devoted to agriculture, or making agriculture a 
specialty, in the world. Now there are scores; and nearly every religious 
and secular weekly newspaper has its agricultural department, and makes a 
point of serving up special dishes for its rural readers. 

An acknowledged pioneer in the wide field of agricultui'al (periodical) 
literature — indeed, the only journal of its class outside New England at the 
time of its establishment twenty years ago — was Moore's Rural New- 
Yorker ; and as a representative of men to whom the country owes much in 
its development, and as an exponent in person of what tact, good judgment, 
rare business enterprise, and a liberal use of the best advertising mediums 
will accomplish, its originator, and present pro])rietor and conductor, is very 
pr«)perly made the subject of this sketch. 

Daniel D. Tompkins Moore was born in Onondaga County, this State, 
February 2, 1S20. Pompey, we believe, was his native town. His father 
was a Baptist minister, and like ministers in general was not very abundantly 
endowed with this world's goods. Therefore the future publisher's early 
opportunities were comparatively meager ; a few years at the common 
school, with possibly a term or two at an academy, comprising his sole edu- 
cational advantages. But "the art preservative" had fascinations for him, 
and at the age of twelve or fourteen years he went to Rochester, and was 
apprenticed to Luther Tucker, then printing the Rochester Advertiser. Here 
he began the actpiirement of that })ractical knowledge of the printing and 
publisliing business, which has stood him in excellent stead, en.abling him to 
attend understandingly to the minutest details of all branches ihereof. 

Henry O'Reilly was at this time editor of the Adrcrfiser, and, being 
appointed postmaster of liochester, engaged the youthful typo to enter the 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. y5 

post-office with him as clerk. In tliis position young Moore continued 
until the ai)poiutment of a new postmaster, when he commenced studying 
law in the office of John C. Nash, Esq., then a prominent member of the 
Rochester bar. That Mr. Moore would have made a good lawyer is evident 
to those who best know his keen insight and ready adaptability ; but it \\ as 
decreed that journalism should not miss his rare vigor and ready pen. The 
deatli of his brother, who was publishing the Jackson Gazette, a Whig organ 
in Jackson, Michigan, threw that paper into the young law-student's hands. 
Putting aside Kent and Blackstone, his law course but partially completed, 
and going into the wilds of the Peninsular State, he set about making a 
lively country paper, and succeeded so well, though then only nineteen years 
old, that the State Legislature became his patron by subscribing for the 
Gazette, and complimented him as "the Ben. Franklin of the West." 

Having published the Gazette several years, he disposed of it, and com- 
menced publishing the Michigan Farmer, the first agricultural paper in 
Michigan, but passed that over to other parties within a few months, and. 
returning to Rochester, bought an interest in the Genesee Farmer, of which 
Dr. Daniel Lee was then one-half owner. At this period the Farmer was a 
monthly, and, though published in the heart of one of the richest and 
most famous fruit and farming regions in the world, was poorly patronized, 
its subscribers numbering less than two thousand. Mr. Moore's connection 
with it began in 1847, and in the three years succeeding his indomitable 
energy so infused it with new life that the circulation increased to ^^pwards 
of twenty thousand, and it was accounted the best journal of its class then in 
America. But his young ambition desired something more progressive still. 
With intuitive foresight, he saw what the people would very soon need — 
indeed, what they even then needed, what they would very soon demand. 
Therefore in 1850 he sold out his interest in the Farmer to begin the publi- 
cation of Moore's Rural New- Yorker. It was to be an agricultural paper 
and something more. Its scope, as declared by its venturesome publisher 
and editor, was broader than that of any journal hitherto issued, and em- 
braced all topics of interest in rural homes. Above all, it was to be a 
weekly issue — fully alive, and abreast of the times. In short, Mr. Moore's 
aim was to send out such a sheet as should find a warm welcome at every 
farmer's fireside, from every member of the family circle. 

The project was pronoimced a wild one, by even his best friends. Few, 
if any, of those most fitted to judge wisely concerning such a venture 
believed it could succeed. It was without precedent. It involved great ex- 
penditure, and Mr. Moore's capital was small. Less determined men would 
have faltered. He put his best endeavors into the undertaking and pushed 
on. The first number of the new quarto appeared January 1, 1851, bearing 
the laudable motto " Progress and Improvement," and was a fair-looking 
sheet for those days, with a make-up evincing more care and taste than was 
then commonly seen, the matter being classified under a variety of heads, 
and each of the eight pages bearing a graceful border. The edition was only 
two thousand, and was worked on a Washington hand-press, Mr. Moore 
himself pulling the first copy, and his foreman, William M. Lewis (who has 
remained with him up to this time in the same capacity), the second. 



56 THE MEX WHO ADVERTISE. 

From such a modest and imcei'tain beginning Jloorc'i^ Rural yeio- 
Yorker has gone on, until to-day it spreads sixteen finely-illustrated pages, 
And circulates one hundred thousand copies weekly. Its history and that of 
its founder cannot be separated. He has given to it the very best energies 
of these last twenty years of his life. To add to its value and usefulness 
has been his one grand object, and to this end he has made every attainable 
means subserve. From the first he has been a liberal advertiser. As cir- 
cumstances would permit, he has made free use of the columns of other 
journals to increase the circulation of his own. Few men know more truly 
the real value of advertising, very few understand so well where to place 
advertisements, and when. 

A quick perception of the popular need has been one of Mr. Moore's 
striking characteristics. To this, together with good literary and practical 
taste, and judicious investment in printer's ink, he owes much of his success. 
There have been purely agricultural journals quite equal to the Rural, con- 
sidered alone as an agricultural journal, but they have never proved 
particularly successful. Mr. Moore saw that the great want was not a purely 
agricultural paper, but one devoted as well to literature, miscellany, news, 
and family affairs ; and the fact that his paper has long been the favorite in 
tens of thousands of homes shows how admirably he has supplied that want. 

Mr. Moore's careful judgment and trained business habits have not been 
allowed to pass wholly unimproved by the public. He was twice elected 
President of the Athenaeum and Mechanics' Association, of Rochester, and 
did much for the welfare of that organization. He served the "Flour 
€ity" two years as Alderman, and at the beginning of the second year was 
unanimously elected President of the Common Council over much older 
members — an honor as unusual as well bestowed. In 1863 he was nominated 
for Mayor by the Republicans, much against his inclination, and proved his 
popularity by a triumphant election where the opposite party had previously 
won the day. As President of the Monroe County Agricultural Society, he 
showed himself emphatically "the right man in the right place." Assuming 
that office when the .Society was burdened with debt, he placed it on a sound 
financial basis, and gave to it much of the character it has since borne as a 
model institution of the kind. 

The labor of the mayoralty, in connection with the constantly-increasing 
cares of his paper, were over-burdensome, and Mr. Moore went out of that 
■office broken down in health, and compelled to peremptorily refuse a second 
nomination which was tendered. His health continued so precarious that 
physicians urged a change of climate, and in consideration of this, and the 
rapid increase of his business, he Avas induced to open a branch pxablica- 
tion office in New York city in January, 186S, and his paper was issued 
nominally from both Rochester and New York through that year, though all 
the editorial and publisliing business was carried on as before, in the former 
place. But finding a residence at the seaboard beneficial to his liealth, and 
desiring to command mechanical and other facilities which could be had only 
in the metropolis, he decided to make New York his headquarters, and in 
December, IHGS, removed the paper hitlicr, l)ringing most of liis old 
employees along therewith. The removal <if its principal office to this city 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 97 

was signalized by an enlargement of the Rural to nearly twice its former 
^ize, making it the largest illustrated paper in the world, and by a further 
increase in circulation and popularity most gratifying indeed. 

As a writer, Mr. Moore is plain, forcible, and pointed. Courteous in 
general tone and style, he can yet be keenly caustic, as he has shown in the 
few journalistic tilts to Avhich he has been provoked. Happy in his choice of 
words, painstakingly exact in his method of expression, he impresses the 
reader as meaning all he says, and as knowing clearly what he means. In 
personal address he is singularly courteous and affable. Genial, generous, 
overflowing with kindly humor, he makes friends with all who come in con- 
tact with him, and is one of the most popular men in his profession. 
Liberal to a fault, he is full of warm sympathy for all ; and in the every-day 
associations of business he is as companionable as amid the cheering 
influences of social life. His recent handsome New-Year's gift of paid-up 
life insurance policies to twenty of his employees, aggregating nearly twenty 
thousand dollars, was a happy illustration of his good feeling toward those 
associated with him, and one of many evidences of that open-heartedness 
which charactei'izes him. Although he has accomplished the labor of half a 
dozen ordinary men, he holds to his youth remarkably, and is pronounced by 
a contemporary the youngest-looking journalist of his years in New York. 
Of a nervous, sanguine temperament, he seems to defy the ravages of time 
and wearing care, and is apparently good for yet twenty-five years more of 
active journalistic duty. Should he be spared for this, as thousands will 
pray he may be, to what high standard he may bring a journal now second 
to none in point of excellence it is impossible even to imagine. 



Editorial Puffijstg. — The system of pufiing has grown to such an 
extent that it has become ofiensive to all sensible people. When the people 
find the editorial columns of a newspaper full of puffs they may safely cal- 
culate that the paper is weak in circulation and pocket. If business men 
desire to make known to the public that they have goods for sale, let them 
advertise them in a proper way. But this editorial puffing is an imposition 
upon the public. — Boston Herald. 



"Dull times," says the Penn Yan Express, "are the best for advertisers." 
Why? Because when money is tight and people are forced to economize, 
they always read the advertisements to ascertain who sells the cheapest, and 
where they can trade to the best advantage. 

7 



KURD & HOUGHTON. 



Among the most skilli'ul of the publishers of the clay may he counted- 
Huid & Houghton of New York. The^firm is composed of Mr. Melancthon 
M. Hurd, formerly of Sheldon, Blaktman & Co., Mr. Henry O. Houghton, 
the eminent j)rinter of Cambridge, Mass., and Mr. Albert G. Ploughton, 
formerly an active business man in Alabama. Business was commenced 
by the two former in March, 1865, and on the first of January, 1860, the 
other member of the firm joined them. Mr. Houghton was for many years 
the printer of works for other establishments, and on his entering into 
arrangements with Mr. Hurd a large amount of business was immediately 
secured. They commenced with a full edition of Dickens's Works and 
Lord Bacon's, the latter being the best extant, and added such authors as 
Montaigne, Carlyle, Pascal, and even Madame de Stael to the list. Mr. Hurd 
is a native of Bridgeport, Conn., where he was born on the 21st of January, 
1828. He entered on a thorough course of study, and was nearly prepared 
to enter at Yale College, when his failing health compelled him to seek 
another mode ot life, and he entered the bookstore of B. Blakeman <fe Co., 
in Bridgeport, where his father was then a silent partner. This was in 
1844. A year after the firm was dissolved, and Mr. Hurd obtained employ- 
ment in the railroad business, where he continued for several years, leaving 
it finally to purchase the same store in Bridgeport where he had formerly 
been a clerk, and which in the meantime had passed through several hands. 
Here he continued until 1^56, when he was invited to enter the publishing 
house of Sheldon, Blakeman & Co., of New York, where he continued until 
February, 1^64, and during the remainder of that year made }»re])aration8 
for entering the firm with which he is now connected. 

Mr. Henry O. Houghton is a graduate of Harvard, and Avell known as 
the conductor of the most artistic and one of the largest printing oflices in 
America. Three hundred workmen are employed, and all the processes 
of book-making except the production of the raAv material are carried on 
under the roofs of their buildings in Cambridge. Tlie type is chosen with 
skill, the printers are excellent, and the proot-ieading is very exact, so that 
when a page leaves the compositors it is tlone as well as can be, and the 
pressman and l)inder peri'nrm their parts e(|ually wril. Forms are im])Osed 
only by eights, sixteciis, and lliii't y-t\\ os, so that tlieic is not th;,t 1 uiicliy and 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 99 

irregular appearance of the collected volume which is often seen. When 
bound, the volume lies flat, and its binding is elastic. An equal care dis- 
tinguishes the stereotyping and electrotyping departments, so that when 
the book is turned out it is just as it should be. 

When the work is printed, then comes in the peculiar skill of Mr. 
Hurd. Handsome copies are sent to editors of influential papers, and 
advertisements are inserted in those periodicals and journals which influence 
the public mind. His business, he thinks, can be best advertised through 
the channel of the dailies, weeklies, and monthlies of the great cities, and 
he selects from them with great care, and relying largely upon the use of 
advertising agencies. For him some newspapers with four or five thousand 
circulation are better than others with a hundred thousand, and he chooses 
accordingly. To no branch of his business is more attention given, and in 
none are there more gratifying results. 

The third member of the firm is a brother of the printer, and brought 
into his new relations both capital and business sagacity. 

Commencing at first with four small pages of titles for their entire 
trade list, they have very largely added to the number, and now comprise 
some of the best books in the market. In January, 1865, the firm pur- 
chased the entire list of the late J. G. Gregory, including a full edition of 
Cooper and Bryant's Poems. In January, 1867, the Riversile Journal for 
Young People was commenced, and it has taken well with the children. 
Eminent writers contribute to its columns, and the editors! dp has been 
conducted with marked ability. Three diflerent editions of Dickens's 
Works were afterwards added, and Dr. Smith's great Bible Dictionary was 
also republished. Hans Christian Andersen writes for them, and they have 
many other authors on their lists. Their latest venture is Old and New, 
a new magazine, conducted by Rev. Edward E. Hale, one of the most 
original magazinists in America, whose editorship promises to give to the 
world a very entertaining and intrinsically good periodical. 



Some say that it is of no use for them to advertise, that they have been 
in the place in busii.ess all their lives, and everybody knows them. Such 
people seem to forget to take into consideration that our country is increasing 
in population nearly forty per cent, every ten years, and no matter how old 
the place may be there are constant changes taking place ; some move to 
other parts, and strangers fill their places. In this age of the world, unless 
the name of a business firm is kept constantly before the public, some new 
firms may start up, and, by liberally advertising, in a very short time take 
the place of the older ones, and the latter rust out, as it were, and be forr 
g otten. No man ever lost money by judicious advertising. 



HENRY E. HUNTE] 



It is not alone from city life that we chronicle great results ; nor are 
the grandest fortunes always made, or the noblest ends attained, within the 
boundaries of paved streets and ponderous walls. It is a fact upon which 
we need not dwell that the greatest, best, and most successful men, in a 
majority of cases, breathed, in boyhood, the free country air, and, while the 
fascinations and allurements of city life draw many to the crowded towns 
and mercantile centres, others of equal capacity and intellect, with, perhaps, 
a grain more of wisdom, remain where their lot has been cast, to succeed, 
if the elements of success be in them, just as well as their more ambitious 
and anticipating companions, who deem a country town too smiill for 
their scope. 

Instances of princely fortunes are confined to no locality, while those 
of men who through perseverance and industry alone have risen to business 
repute and standing are still more common. There are three points of 
importance for a business man always to be guided by and act upon : First, 
whatever be his business, to give himself to it and make his goods or manu- 
factures equally as good, and, if possible, better than those of his neighbors ; 
second, to advertise judiciously and constantly; and third, to see that every 
inquiry and demand is promptly met. If either of these essentials be neg- 
lected a minimum success can alone be obtained, it matters not whether the 
aspirant be in town or country. Experience has proved, in many instances, 
that the latter has equal advantages, which men have not been slow to 
accept. 

Every one who reads newspaper advertisements, and none should 
neglect this, must, at some time, have discovered the names of Messrs. 
Hunter & Co., of Hinsdale, in the old Granite State. We say must have 
because the names are always there. It matters not to these enterprising 
publishers whether the sun has crossed the equinox ; be the winter or tlie 
summer solstice upon us the results are the same. They believe in adver- 
tising the year through, and hence the heat or cold deters ihein not. Many 
of our city advertisers, in this respect, would do well to pattern after them. 

Henry E. HuTiter, the senior raeral>er of the firm, as born in Enfield, 
Mass. While yet a mere boy, a strong passion for newspa ers and all the 
characteristics of Yankee ingenuity was early developed. From following 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 101 

the plough, he entered a puhlishujg house in Rutland, and m this latter 
position became associated with matters more congenial to his taste, and soon 
alter a single advertisement in the New York Clipper ushered him, for the 
first time, into the ranks of the advertising public. Ill health caused a tem- 
porary change in his pursuits, but again, in 1863, he renewed them more 
strenuously than ever, and locating himself at Hinsdale, N. H., commenced, 
in connection with the publishing business, the issue of a paper called the 
litar SiKUigled Banner. From that time success has been constant and 
increasing. Tlte little town of Hinsdale numbers among its inhabitants no 
more industrious or energetic citizen, and his public spirit and enterprise 
have done much for its welfare. Business always commands his tirst 
attention, and he is ever foithful in its execution. The advertising, which 
he never neglects, brings a daily increase of custom, and the systematic 
manner in which he executes orders is worthy of note. 

The business of the firm consists chiefly in forwarding, by mail, books 
of all kinds and dates to any applicant. Their catalogue is more varied and 
has selections more general than that of many of our largest city publishers. 
They boast of their ability to fill orders for any book, ancient or modern, 
and we doubt not they can do it. It matters not what is called for, be it 
" The Wild Woman of Texas, or the Wrecked Heart," or a " Treatise on 
Consumption;" "The Lunatic Lover," or " Paley's Theology;" the works of 
Johnson or of Sir Walter Scott ; they are ever at hand, ready to be for- 
warded by the first mail. Martin Chuzzlewit is dispatched in the same 
bundle with Bancroft's History of the United States. "Works by the very 
best authors" are sent hand in hand with " Beadle's Dime Novels ;" " Count 
of Monte Christo " is closely bound to the " Trapper's Daughter," and " The 
Young Housekeeper " finds herself entangled in the same threads that hold 
" The Year after Marriage." Indeed, the catalogue itself is a curiosity, and 
is, in short, an ornnmm gatherum of everything that ever was published by 
anybody. To avoid mistakes in such a complicated business, system is 
evidently necessary, for they often receive in a single day more than three 
hundred and fifty letters. Mr. Hunter — adopting the maxim of Franklin, 
" If you would have a thing well done see to it yourself; if indifi'erently 
done see to it by deputy," personally opens every letter and superintends 
the filling of every order. The modus operandi is given in their circular, 
as follows : 

" Some of our customers seem to have the impression that our business 
is liable to numerous mistakes. We do not claim to make no mistakes, but 
we do claim that our busmess is managed as well, and our orders filled as 
promptly, as by any other dealer. To commence. On the arrival of a mail 
at the post office it is at once brought to our office in a locked bag, by a 
messenger specially employed for the purpose. The bag is there opened by 
a member of the firm in his private office, and the letters examined and 
opened carefully. Whatever money each letter contains is marked on it, 
and the orders are then given to the mailing clerk to fill. The books are 
well wrapped and plainly addressed, and after being stamped with the 
amount necessary are placed in United State mail bags and forwarded 
by the first mail leaving. No order is allowed to 'lie over" unless abso- 



102 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

lutely necessary. Small orders receive the same attention as large ones, 
each and every order being filled in rotation. All orders are filled up 
' square ' every day, and, as our regular out mail is from three to six large 
mail bags full, daily, no mail matter is ever left over. The department of 
our business relating to the Banner is conducted in the same manner, and, 
with our trusty assistants, we think we can please new as we have done our 
old customers. After ten years' experience in the business (w^hich w^e have 
made a study), and giving all our personal attention to it, Ave- think we know 
how to suit our customers and give them satisfaction. It seem:; ' small busi- 
ness ' to mail a dime novel and make only one and one-half cents profit, but 
we can do it, and by doing enough of it we make a living and ' pay 
our bills.' ■' 

Their own publications are by no means few or of minor consequence, 
but have attained large sales and considerable notoriety. The firm make a 
specialty of receiving mutilated currency in payment of orders, and during 
the past year have forAvarded many thousand dollars to the Treasury for 
redemption. 

We believe there is no other house in the country wliich has carried the 
specialty, if specialty it can be called, to such a degree of perfection. It 
matters not what you may desire. If at our Broadway palaces your favorite 
book cannot be obtained, forward an order for it to Hunter & Co., and it 
will be forthcoming by return mail. There is no firm more reliable, and no 
other establishment where an order can be filled with less trouble to the 
customer. In the catalogue before us they give the following six reasons 
for claiming patronage : 

" 1st. Because our establishment is not a humbug concern. We have 
been in the trade for years and ' know the ropes.' We do business in our 
own name and can be found ' at home ' every day in the week. 

" 2d. Because we sell books at the regular publishers" prices, and do not 
charge double as some dealers do. 

'•3d. Because books will go safer when mailed by us tluui when they 
are sent from a large chy, where everything is done in a hurry. 

" 4th. Because our business is done through the mails and expresses 
exclusively. AVe do no local business, and have no old or sliop-worn books. 
AVe buy daily, and our books and goods are all new. 

" 5th. Because we buy directly from publishers and manufacturers. We 
buy for cash, and neither trust nor get trusted. We thus have no old debts 
to pay nor bad ones to lose, and can give our customers the benefits of the 
cash system. And, 

"Lastly. Because every oidcr receives oui- ])ersonal attention, is filled 
promptly, and sent by return m.iil. \Vc cndcavoi- lo ih) our business on 'a 
fair and square' principle, and <h) not li.nc recourse to humbug" recom- 
mendations, preferring in the futuri'. ;is in ihc ]):isl,to stand on our merits. 
And in soliciting the favor of tlic pu))lic wc lu-oniisc to do oui- best to merit 
their approbation.'' 

And here with an ever increasing business we must leave our friends 
from the Granite State. We knew them when orders of two and three 
doll.irs ])er d:iy were rare, and excited rcniiirk. and see thcni now with a 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 103 

demand upon their resources taxing the constant attention of both partners, 
as well as that of a large corps of clerks. And noAA^ for the moral : How 
has such unparalleled success been achieved? If you doubt our solution 
of the mystery, ask Mr. Hunter, and he will tell you that from first to last 
every sale he has ever made may be traced, directly or indirectly, to steady 
and persistent adcertisinf/. 



No greater mistake is made by people who advertise than in the value 
they set upon editorial puffs in the newspapers. What we mean by that is 
the style of articles found in the local columns and " leaded " as editorial 
matter, and generally descriptive of somebody's cigars, candy, cock-tails, or 
cabbages. Many people suppose these to be the most valuable advertise- 
ments, when in fact they are the very poorest. The public generally under- 
stand that these paragraphs are paid for either in favors or cash, and estimate 
them accordingly. Some people ask the editor for a puff and " encourage " 
him properly too, more for the purpose of reading his extravagant language 
and witnessing his ingenuity in the use of expletives than for the profit they 
expect to derive. Some are too indolent to write their own advertisements, 
and still others resort to a puff in order to get a dead-head notice. This is 
all wrong. Puffs are the most worthless of advertisements. Some men are 
willing enough to pay for printing ink, but they imagine that palpable straight- 
out advertising is not exactly the thing. They want to get it done in the 
third person, or to have the endorsement of the editorial " we." That busi- 
ness man who soonest educates himself out of this delusion will have the 
most greenbacks. A business man's advertisement in his own language, over 
his own signature, and for which he is plainly responsible, is in the nature of 
an official document, and receives more considerate attention than a puff in 
the local column, and is both more valuable and respectable. There is an air 
about the responsible advertisement which says, " I want to trade and will 
give you a fair bargain." The puff insinuates that there is no responsibility 
in the matter. When we have occasion to advertise our own business, we 
rarely make editorial mention of it, but insert an advertisement. This view 
of the subject is not inconsistent with the common practice of making edi- 
torial mention of new advertisements, and the largest papers can never do 
-that, nor of local mention of matters that are constantly occui-ring in the 
business community by which any man's business may be called into notice. 
One is a news item, and the other is an introduction, as it were, of a new cus- 
-tomer to the reading or business public. 



T. W. EVANS. 



In the year 1855, William Hunt and Thomas W. Evans established 
themselves in Philadelphia in the perfumery business, under the name and 
style of Hunt & Evans, being a branch of the house already established in 
London. For five years the business in Philadelphia was carried on at a loss, 
and distrust and disappointment filled the minds of both partners. At this 
stage of afikirs Mr. Hunt returned to London, quite satisfied that the specula- 
tion in Philadelphia was a failure. The business then Avas conducted by T, 
W. Evans alone, on a new plan, namely ; making specialties in the business 
and advertising them thoroughly. Still business did not prosper, and a 
dissolution of partnership took place in 1862. Mr. Hunt became disgusted 
and retired from the concern. The remaining partner, T. W. Evans, having 
faith in the merits of his specialties, and unbounded confidence in persistent 
and steady advertising, redoubled his efforts and increased his advertising 
expenses, when the tide at length turned, his preparations commenced to 
sell, orders flocked in daily, and in two years from the dissolution of part- 
nership he recovered all the money previously lost, and his preparations sold 
from one end of the continent to the other. In fact, advertising made the 
business what it is, and its enterprising proprietor a snug fortune in the' 
bai-gain. 

T. W. Evans was born in Leicestershire, England ; was in business in 
London eight yeai's, and emigrated to this country to establish a branch of 
the concern in Philadelphia. He is about forty-five years of age; of genial 
h.abits and generous disposition. He lives in an elegant mansion on West 
Gi-een street, of which he is the owner, and bids fair to rank in wealth and 
influence with several other enterprising advertisers who have made the 
Quaker city the scene of their operations. 



WM. C. DODGE. 



The subject of this sketch, now the senior membei- of the firm of 
Dodge & Munn, was born in Central New York, December 9, 1828. He 
was the only son of a poor farmer, who, having a large family dependent 
upon his earnings, was unable to. give his son anything more than a very 
limited common school education. At the age of sixteen young Dodge set 
out to " paddle his own canoe," his entire capital consisting of a solitary dime 
in his pocket and a suit of cheap clothing tied up in a cotton handkerchief. 
With this outfit he left home, not knowing where he was to obtain a dinner 
or a night's lodging. Determined to earn an honest living, he was not long 
in finding a situation as a farmer at the remunerative sum of ten dollars per 
month during the summer. He afterwards taught school for a couple of 
terms, and finally in 1846 migrated to the Territory of Wisconsin, there 
being at that time no railroads west of Buffalo. His first operation at the 
West was to engage in the publication of a newspaper, after which he 
studied law, and in 1849 was among the first to cross the plains to Cali- 
fornia. During his sojourn in the land of gold he traveled all through the 
mining regions, during which time he was twice at the point of death from 
hardship and sickness incident to exposure and privation, at one time laying 
for weeks delirious on the sand under a tree in the northern mines. During 
his trip thither he, with his two companions, was compelled for fourteen 
days to subsist on a single pancake apiece at a meal. He subsequently 
returned to the States, and in 1859 was comfortably settled with a good 
business in the West, when by a disastrous fire in midwinter his property 
and business were both destroyed, thus leaving him with an invalid wife and 
three small children again at the foot of the ladder. 

At this time a member of Congress, much to his surprise, oflfered to 
secure him a situation in the Government employment if he would go to 
Washington. He finally concluded to accept it temporarily, and upon the 
accession of President Lincoln Secretary Smith, who had incidentally 
learned of his ability and misfortune, oifered him a position in the examining 
corps of the United States Patent Office. This position he held until the 
spring of 1864, when he resigned it in consequence of his having made some 
valuable inventions, the law not permitting any one in the Patent Office to 
acquire an interest in a patent except by inheritance. 



106 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

It was while acting as au examiner that he conceived the idea and began 
the system of advertising that finally resulted in building up his present 
profitable business. "While most of those in Government employment were 
spending their time and money in billiard saloons and about the hotels he 
was hard at work studying patent law and preparing for publication a series 
of articles explaining fully the princijjles on which our patent system is 
based, together with a description of the entire routine of business in the 
Patent Oflice. These articles were intended, as he stated to a friend at the 
time, as an advertisement to pave the way for the future business that he 
intended to build up ; and so popular were they that one individual ordered a 
thousand extra copies of one article, and the whole were subsequently pub- 
lished in the Scientific and Mining Press of California for its own benefit. 

Soon after leaving the ofiice he established his present business of 
solicitor and counsellor on patent cases, and at once set vigorously to 
advertising in the newspapers, a course that was looked upon by many of 
the old fogy solicitors not only as an innovation upon the established order 
of things, but almost unprofessional, and therefore undignified ! Some of 
the old heads who had been in the business for a quarter of a century, and 
who seemed to think they had acquired an exclusive right to it, were aston- 
ished at the impudence of this young upstart or interloper, as they 
considered him; and did not hesitate to predict his speedy failure, as many 
before him had failed. Paying no attention to them, he attended strictly to 
his business and kept on advertising. His business grew apace, and soon 
those who had affected to despise him saw not only that he was " a foeraan 
worthy of their steel," but also that he was outstripping them in the business. 
He soon had more than he could do, and as his business still continued to 
increase, he finally associated with him his present partner, H. B. Munn, 
Esq., a graduate of Princeton and a lawyer of standing and ability, and to- 
day the firm stands among the very first in the country in their line of 
business. 

With the spread of their business, of course manufacturers and others 
interested in patents came to know more of Mr. Dodge, and so well has his 
reputation become established that not only is the firm regularly emj^loyed 
by many of the largest concerns in the country, but Mr. Dodge himself is 
sought after and employed as an "expert" in patent cases fir and near, 
frequently visiting Pittsburgh, Chicago, New York, Baltimore, and other 
cities in that capacity. 

He is also a prolific inventor himself, having patented some eight inven- 
tions of his own, two of which are being used by the Government. A third 
was bought by the celebrated pistol manufacturers. Smith & Wesson, who 
will soon have it applied to their pistol, making it by far the most perfect 
arm in the world, while a fourth, a breech-loading double-barreled shot-gun, 
is acknowledged by all to be the l)est thing of its kind at home or abroad, 
and is about being manufactured by another firm. Thus while attending to 
the inventions of others he is also himself inventing. He is a most indus- 
trious worker, often devoting fifteen to eigliteen hours out of the 
twenty-four to his business. " Wliatevcr he finds for his hands to do he 
does with all his might," and tlie motto of the firm is that "wlialever is 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 107 

worth doing at all is worth doing well," whether it be advertising to get 
business or doing the business when it is obtained. While scores of others 
have started agencies oftering to work for "contingent" fees — "no patent no 
pay" — at " half price/' and on various other lottery plans, did not advertise 
and failed, this firm did advertise and has gone steadily forward, constantly 
increasing their business and their income. Their idea is that in order to 
secure the business of the public they must let the jDublic know that they are 
prepared and competent to serve it ; in short, must advertise, and the success 
which has attended their own application of this rule is the best possible 
evidence of its soundness and correctness. Not only do they act on this 
principle themselves, but they advise others to do the same. It not unfre- 
quently happens that after having procured a patent for an inventor he 
comes to them for advice as to the best plan to realize upon it. Their inva- 
riable reply is : " Get it before the public — advertise it, advertise it ! It is 
the only plan, for unless you get it before the public and get it adopted, it 
is worth no more than so much waste paper." 

With all their business both members of the firm find time occasionally 
to write for the press, both writing now and then for newspapers, while Mr. 
Dodge occasionally prepares articles for magazines or periodicals, especially 
on subjects relating to the mechanic arts. 



Cost of Advertising. — In this, as in every thing else, the best papers 
will command the best pi-ices. It is cheaper to pay 5s. for inserting your ad- 
vertisement in a journal having a circulation of 5,000, than to pay 2s. for one 
th.at has only a circulation of 1,000. Of this you may be sure, that any jour- 
nal that inserts advertisements cheap is, in fact, a worthless medium. If it 
were really a good one it would have no need to lower its prices, for its sheet 
would be filled without the sacrifice. You may lay it down as a rule that 
every journal knows its value, and that if it adopts low prices it is because it 
is conscious that it has a low circulation in number or in respectability. — 
Wthon^s Handbook for Advertisers. 



When people see a man advertise they know he is a business man, and hi» 
advertising proclaims that he is not above business, but anxious to do it. 



A. J. FULLAM. 



This gentleman commenced as a poor farmer's boy when he made his 
start in life. He made his first set of stencil tools in 1856, without pattern, 
or without ever having seen any before. This was at the shop of Briggs & 
Hodgman, blacksmiths, at Saratoga Springs, and the undertaking occupied 
him six weeks. In the meantime he struck and blew at the anvil and 
bellows one hour each day in order to pay for the use of blacksmith's tools, 
not tasting a morsel of anything but common baker's bread during the time, 
and sleeping under the broad canopy of heaven, with the root of a friendly 
oak for his pillow. 

As soon as his tools were completed he commenced cutting and selling 
stencil plates. Having made a little money by this, he attired himself 
fashionably and sent for his mother from Vermont. She took up her abode 
for awhile in Saratoga, and her son meantime lifted the mortgage from his 
father's farm, amounting to nearly twelve hundred dollars, bought the 
property of the Black River Company lor three thousand, secured a patent 
on his tools, and commenced advertising. He then went into real estate 
matters and bought thirty lots in the village of Springfield, Vermont, 
including a row of tenement houses. 

In 1868 he founded the United States Piano Company, owning all 
the stock himself, and turned the most prominent building and water- 
power in the town into a factory for this purpose. At the .same time he 
opened ware-rooms for the sale of pianos in New York, at 650 Broad- 
way, Mr. FuUam does not owe a dollar in the world outside of late 
contracts for real estate, has a flourishing business, and says that every 
shilling he is possessed of he owes to advertising. 



WESTERN "OUTSIDES" AND "INSIDES. 



One of the most wonderful results of the recent tremendous growth of 
the newspaper press in America has been the increase of facilities afforded 
to them in the way of agencies for advertising, and in offices for printing 
part of a newspaper and transmitting the unfinished sheet to the editor in 
order to have the journal comjjleted. Such offices as those of Cramer, 
Aikens & Cramer, of Milwaukee, Kellogg, of Chicago, Kimball & Taylor, 
of Belleville, III, and the Franklin Press Company, of Middletown, New 
York, can only be successful where transportation is cheap and prompt, and 
when plenty of advertising can be found in the great cities. The Wisconsin 
list is the largest of these, has achieved much, and is now prej^aring to 
establish an eastern agency. 

Mr. A. J. Aikens is the father of this new system of facilitating the labor 
of country editors. It is true that outsides and insides have long been 
printed in England, but we believe never with such gratifying results or so 
cheaply to editors. Mr. Aikens is a graduate of the printing office of the 
late Charles G. Eastman, at Woodstock, Vermont, and was under the tuition 
of poor Major E. A. Kimball, who was shot by his commanding general, 
near Norfolk, during the war of the rebellion. Major Kimball was one of 
the swiftest of hand-pressmen, and was as well an expert compositor and an 
excellent reader of manuscript. At this office was printed the Spirit of the 
Age, a weekly newspaper of very considerable influence in the politics of 
Vermont. From the matter of the Age was made up a small quarto cam- 
paign paper, the Coon Hunter. Perched on a stool behind the press, doing 
the " rolling," Aikens had ample time for reflection upon the art preservative, 
except when the Major had hold of the "rounce;" then he thought he shouted 
"more color" oftener than the complexion of the sheet required. About 
this time there was a practice introduced by Mr. V. B. Palmer of sending 
out several columns of " ads." entitled " Boston Business Directory." This 
Directory was identical in the whole New England country press. It 
occurred to Aikens after he had been promoted to the advertising case that 
there was a vast amount of labor thrown away in duplicating the composi- 
tion of these advertisements in the different offices to which they were sent. 
He had seen how cheap it was to make a Coon Hunter out of the dead forms 
of the Spirit of the Age, and it was a natural result of even very ordinary 



110 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

reflection that, if the advertising could be duplicated, or as a printer would 
say, saved, a paper could be very cheaply produced. This method of using 
the same reading matter for duplicate papers is as old as newspapers them- 
selves. 

After Mr. Aikens had removed to Milwaukee, there was ample time to 
think up the project, and when the civil war had deprived the hand-presses 
of the strong right arms which propelled them a golden opportunity 
occurred. The IState Journal, of Madison, had been printing several out- 
sides for various periodicals in that vicinity, but it was not until the Evening 
Wisconsin commenced that it became a distinctive business. Soon after 
the commencement of the work, Mr. Aikens's Boston Business Directory idea 
was revived, and he secured about sixty merchants of Milwaukee to order 
their cards in all the papers in Wisconsin and Minnesota that could be 
secured to print in the Wisconsin office, at a stipulated price per paper per 
annum. They very soon printed thirty or forty paperson one side, and by 
means of the duplicate advertising reduced the price of printed papers to 
that of white paper. Of course the most of the Madison list soon came to 
them under this novel inducement of paying newspapers for the privilege of 
doing their printing. 

Kow, as there is a large class of advertising that goes into all the papers 
in the United States, just as the Boston Business Directory did into all Xew 
England papers, and as the Milwaukee Directory did into all the Wisconsin 
and Minnesota papers, the proprietors issued a general circular to adA^ertisers 
and also one to the press for a national edition of insides. Very soon they 
printed one side of newspapers in several difterent States. Some changes 
and modifications have taken place in their system as they have found it 
convenient or necessary, but the mainspring of the whole machinery is, and 
has always been, the duplicate advertisements which have been inserted in 
all the papers. This alone " accounts for the milk in the cocoanut.'' 

At first, S. M. Pettengill, G. P. Rowell & Co., Cook, Coburn, & Co., 
and other advertising agents, would not listen to the talk of Mr. Aikens 
about circulation and cheap rates. Helmbold, Dr. Brandreth, Mr. Evans, 
Mr. Hodge, Mr. Drake and other large advertisers came in reluctantly, but 
finally they were won by low prices. And as soon as it could be demon- 
strated that his theory was practicable the advertising agents gave him large 
contracts from the best advertisers in the country. 

Few people understand the process by which these "insides'' and "out- 
sides" are manufactured, and yet the matter is easy to be understood. The 
seven-column papers, which are neuti-al in politics, are worked one after 
another, only the name and folios being changed ; then the form is taken off 
the press, a column or two is taken out and Democratic matter put in. 
After all the Democratic papers are printed, then the political matter which 
leans that way is taken out, and Republican put in. A similar course is 
followed with the six, eight and nine-column journals, until the whole are 
worked off, and some idea of the amount of work involved may be formed 
from the fact that it would take twenty-five hand-presses, working the entire 
week, to get off a like edition. It may readily be imagined what a saving 
there is on this. For instance, Mr. Bonner sends a four-column story, the 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. HI 

first chapters to go in the two hundred papers of the Northwestern list. 
They have to set up the matter only twice, at a cost of say sixteen dollars. 
Now, if he had sent it to the two hiindred papers, they would set it up two 
hundred times, at an expense of eight dollars to each paper, and an aggre- 
gate expense of one thousand six hundred dollars. Aikens can insert it for 
less than one-half the cost of setting the type. Advertisements that require 
illustration by cuts can be inserted for the cost of the electrotypes. Of 
course these rates have at length brought the business. 

By this co-operative system of advertising, more than two himdred and 
fifty thousand dollars is annually saA^ed to the advertisers and the papers ; 
about one-half to the advertisers and one-half to the papers. A branch has 
just been established in New York, to print editions for the East and South, 
to facilitate their business, and Mr. Aikens, to show his faith in printing, has 
advertised largely in periodicals of the North and East. 



KiNZEY lately sold a bill of goods to a country milliner who knew noth- 
ing about him except that eight years before, when she resided in New York, 
he had advertised extensively. It was the first time she had ever been down 
from the country to purchase, since leaving the city, and Kinzey obtained the 
business on account of his advertisements eight years before. Who will say 
that newspapers are forgotten as soon as read ? 



Customers, like sheep, are gregarious, and flock where they see others 
go. If nobody else were engaged in the same business, it would be 
important to tiadesmen and dealers to advertise in the paper, because people 
are tempted to buy what they read of. But others are engaged in the same 
business, and even if they do not advertise it is important for you to do 
so; if they do advertise it becomes doubly important. 



THE PACIFIC RAILROAD ADVERTISING. 



In the year 1867, the managers of both the Union Pacific and Central 
Pacific Railroads determined to put their First Mortgage Bonds upon the 
market, to supply funds with which to push forward the work of construc- 
tion. The roads were being built rapidly. The Union Pacific was com- 
pleted for more than three hundred miles west from Omaha, and the Central 
Pacific had climbed the rugged western slope of the Sierra Nevadas. But 
to carry the work on it was necessary to realize upon the securities of the 
two companies. The sale of railroad bonds had previously been confined 
to capitalists in the large cities or to the people immediately along the line 
of the road. In the case of the Union Pacific, there were no people along 
the line; hence the Committee of the Board of Directors, to which the 
negotiation of the bonds was entrusted, looked to the financial centres for 
their purchasers. These gentlemen apparently thought that the simple fact 
that their road was to run across the continent, and that it was a semi- 
national work, would be enough to sell the bonds. They, therefore, in the 
spring of 1867, spent about seven thousand dollars in a month's time in 
advertising in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. The result was not so 
satisfactory as was expected. "Manifest Destiny" helped to secure the 
desired investments at later periods, but at this time, while the public felt 
a pride in the Continental Railroad, they were not eager to put their money 
into it. The Company found that a more vigorous effort must be made to 
sell the bonds, and in May employed Mr. W. B. Shattuck, whose experience 
in charge of the promotion of the Government loans rendered his aid more 
valuable now, to take in hand the advertising. He formed his plan of 
oi)erations upon the theory that the loan should be j^opnlavized and not 
confined to the classes who had usually taken such securities. One main 
obstacle to popular attention and favor was that the road was a great way 
ofi"; the country it travei'sed was a traditional wilderness; a vague know- 
ledge pervaded the public mind that a Pacific Railroad was building, but as 
to its actual progress, the mode of building it, the probabilities of future 
business, and the amount of hard work that was being put ni)on it, the people 
at large knew next to nothing. They must have light, and accordingly a 
pamphlet was prepared, with a map and full information concerning the 
interior Territories; a map of the line with explanatory text appeared in the 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 113 

columns of the leading daily and weekly papers, and thus was diifused that 
knowledge of the scene of operations which was necessary before the loan 
could become popular. Persistent advertising forced the subject upon the 
attention of the reading public, and, in the course of a month, the bonds 
began to sell rapidly. The advertising was kept brisk during the summer, 
and by September the rapid sales deluded the Company into a belief that the 
bonds would float by themselves upon this high tide of general favor. The 
advertising expense was cut ofl", and the sales fell off likewise. Indeed, it 
was found, all through this railroad advertising, that the amount of skillful 
and p&rsistent advertising w^as a sure barometrical indication of the amount 
of bond sales. It was not enough that the public should be told of the 
character of the work and the security of the bonds; they must be told 
repeatedly and continuously. The advertisements published during any 
single month influenced those who had money at their disposal in that 
month, but with the multitude whose fimds became available at subsequent 
periods the impression made by the advertisements at an earlier date had 
faded, or become supplanted by other projects more persistently pushed. 
Every portion of the year brings surplus funds for investment to men 
engaged in different pursuits. When the farmer is " flush " with money from 
the sale of his crops, the manufacturer of the implements with which that 
farmer has earned his profits is employing all his spare capital in preparing 
for his spring sales. When holders of bank, manufacturing, or other stocks 
are seeking the best investment for their dividends, the manufacturers them- 
selves, and all those dependent upon or intimately connected with them, are 
finding money too tight to think of buying any bonds, however good. So, 
too, the different sections of the country respond liberally to advertising at 
varying times, according to the governing industrial interests of each. Five 
thousand dollars in advertising in a certain section of New England may 
bring large results in January and February, while the same section may not 
repay the newspaper bills to a like amount in May or June ; other sections, 
meantime, directly reversing this comparative return for the outlay. It is 
the business of the experienced advertising agent to know how best to 
utilize this seemingly inconstant, but really logical demand. The Union 
Pacific Railroad Company found that just in the proportion that they kept 
the influence of newspaper advertising columns at work in favor of their 
enterprise, in the same proportion did they make their sales. 

After an inactive season in the fall of 1867, the advertising was again 
begun vigorously, the extension of the road to the foot of the Rocky Moun- 
tains (" Five hundred miles of Civilization" added to the productive domain 
of the country, as the Tribune said) being made the occasion for active 
effort. In November, December, and January, a large amount of money 
was judiciously used in the newspapers, the editors of which were furnished 
with a full supply of facts for accompanying editorial notice of the wonderful 
rapidity with which the road was being built, and so large did the sales of 
bonds become that on the 31st of January the price was advanced from 
ninety to ninety-five, and a week later from ninety-five to par. None of 
the Company could now question the wisdom of wide-spread and diligent 



114 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

advertising. With the opening of spring came more rapid track-laying, ■ 
and an opportunity for frequent changes of the advertisements, showing the 
increased length of road built, and the diminished distance to be overcome 
before the whole line to the Pacific should be complete. On October '28th., 
" Five Huxdred Miles 

OF THE 

UuiON Pacific Railiioad, Kuxxing West from Omaha, Across thh 

CONTIXENT, HAVE BEEN COMPLETED,"' 

headed the Company's advertisements. On November 23d, "five hundred 
and twenty-five miles" were announced. Then followed, like the successive 
bulletins of progress of an advancing army, "five hundred and forty miles" 
on January 8th ; " five hundred and fifty miles " on April 10th ; " six hun- 
dred miles" on May 25th; "six hundred and forty miles" on June 18th; 
" six hundred and sixty miles " on July 2d ; " seven hundred miles " on July 
21st; "seven hundred and fifty miles" August 12th; "seven hundred and 
eighty miles " September 1st; " eight hundred and sixty miles " October 6th; 
"nine hundred and sixty miles" December 15th; "one thousand miles" 
January 10th, 1869; and "one thousand and twenty-six miles" February 
25th. Meanwhile, so satisfactory were the results of the vigorous adver- 
tising that in June, 1868, the demand for the bonds exceeded the supply, 
and subscribers were given certificates to be redeemed in bonds whenever 
they could lawfully be issued upon completed sections of the road, and upon 
the 18th of the same month the price was again advanced to one hundred 
and two. This was a magnificent year's work, a splendid marvel of achieve- 
ment for the men who managed and who did the work, and an unanswerable 
argument for the tremendous power of the press when skillfully brought to 
bear upon the accomplishment of a grand and honorable result. 

During this time, the Central Pacific Company had been likewise adver- 
tising very liberally, although not as extensively, and had realized similar 
success. They had stimulated the sales of their bonds (which had the same 
basis and were of like conditions with those of the Union Pacific) so that 
they had been doing almost equally rapid construction with the latter. In 
March, 1869, the roads had met upon the borders of Great Salt Lake, and 
the advertising accounts were closed, having effected the sale of nearly 
thirty millions of Union Pacific Bonds and about twenty millions of Central 
Pacifies. The statement of advertising account rendered to the Union 
Pacific Company, Avhich embraced the operations of a little more than one 
year, covered one hundred and sixty-five pages of bill paper. 

Until the vigorous financial campaign which we have briefly sketched 
the prevailing idea was, as we have noted, that railroad bonds must be 
negotiated, if at all, in the large financial cities, and hence the first adver- 
tising, as we have seen, was done in these places alone. But the experience 
acquired in the placing of the (Tovernment loans convinced Mr. Shattuck 
that the people^ and not merely bankeis and capitalists, had large means to 
invest in anything that was intrinsically good, if the case was fully presented 
to them. In Buj)port of this opinion, it was found that the advertising in 
the smaller cities and country towns paid better, relatively, than in the large 
cities. The loan was popularized, like the five-twenties and ten-forties, and 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. US 

Union Pacific Bonds are to-day held in farmers' chests and country bankers' 
vaults throughout New England and the Middle States. Since the negotia- 
tions of the Pacific Railroad loans, railway bonds have been put upon the 
market in rapid succession, and it has been found that companies having 
the energy to advertise largely, and thus personally interest the general 
public in the management of their roads, have the sagacity to manage them, 
economically, and thus aid in the best development of the country. 



Advertising. — Publicity is money. This has come to be recognized 
as a principle in business. Competition is so keen, and we live in such busy 
times, that a man's only chance of success lies in proclaiming the merits of 
his wares far and wide, up and down the market. He must keep a trum- 
peter, the public attention must be arrested, and he who best succeeds in 
this has the best chance of making a fortune. In this conviction almost 
every one of any spirit advertises. It is found not to be sufficient for a 
tradesman to put up a sign over his door for people to come and look at ; he 
must send out his sign far and wide, and makes people see it and remember 
it in spite of themselves. To do this effectually requires tact and knowledge. 
There is an art in advertising. It may be costly and ineflective, or cheap 
and profitable. All depends on how it is set about. It must be done 
boldly. It is useless to go into a crowd and raise a feeble wail which is 
drowned in the general clamor. It will not do to imitate the genteel woman 
who in crying fish for the first time would not lift her voice for fear any one 
should hear her. There is another sense in which every advertiser should 
be bold. He should have confidence in publicity — should be quite certain 
that if he throws his bread upon the waters he must find it, even if it be 
"after many days." It is the half-hearted people who fail. You cannot 
break the Homburg bank by risking half-crowns on "red" or "black." 
These timid people are the victims of advertising adventurers — people who 
start papers specially to meet their case. They are known not to be able to 
resist the bait of a cheap advertisement, and will give an order for " fifty 
insertions at sixpence apiece" with vast satisfaction, thinking they have 
driven a hard bargain. So they have for themselves. Low prices mean 
limited circulation ; and that in its turn implies that the advertiser in search 
of publicity might as well shut his advertisement up in his own iron safe. A 
guinea a line for three hundred thousand circulation is a better speculation 
than sixpence for twenty lines to one selling from four to six hundred. — Th* 
Weekly Budget^ England. 



S. M. SPENCER & CO. 



The art of forming letters by the use of stencil plates appears to be ot 
quite ancient origin. Some one thousand four hundred years ago, as we 
read, Justin, one of the Eastern Roman Emperoi-s, and Theodoric, a Gothic 
king, being unable to write their names, used to make their signatures with 
a stencil. The letters were cut in a thin board to guide the pen, the board 
being placed on the paper. If we are not misinformed, Quintilian also 
recommended this method as useful in teaching the art of penmanship. If, 
therefore, we date the birth of printing from the time of Guttenburg, sten- 
ciling is in reality elder brother to the " art preserAative." 

It was not, however, until within a very few years that stenciling arrived 
at anything like the dignity of an art ; and in no historical Avork on the 
mechanical arts which we have been able to consult do we find any notice of 
it whatever. We therefore hazard nothing in saying that to the taste, 
mechanical skill, and unyielding perseverance of Messrs. S. M. Spencer & Co., 
of Brattleboro, is in a large measure due the credit of having reduced the 
manufacture of stencil dies to a complete system. Owing in a great measure 
to their improved methods of manufacturing the tools necessary in cutting the 
plates, greatly reducing their cost, and at the same time greatly adding to 
the beauty of the work, the amount of stencil work used in this country has 
increased ten-fold in the last five years, and the uses to which the art is 
applied have greatly multiplied. From marking the brand upon every 
barrel of flour to the designing of the finest embroidery pattern stenciling 
is now successfully practiced. 

The business of manufacturing stencil dies and outfits now can-iod on 
by Messrs. Spencer & Co. was established by D. L. Milliken about ten years 
ago. In 1863 one half the concern was purchased by S. M. Spencer, who 
the following year bought the entire business. April 1, 1866, Mr. Spencer 
received as equal partner in the concern Mr. O. B. Douglas, formerly a resi- 
dent of Orwell, Vermont, under the name and style of S. M. Spencer & Co. 
As an indication of the increase in the amount of business under the present 
management we state that in 186-4 and 1865 the entire business was carried 
on m all its details by Mr. Spencer in person. Now, besides the use of greatly 
improved machinery, they have twelve workmen in constant employment, 
and their tools are sent to all parts of the country, and even foreign lands. In 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 117 

making their improved dies the celebrated Jessup steel is used, each letter is 
carciully finished by hand by experienced workmen, and everything sent ont 
by them is of the very best quality and warranted to be such by them. 
They manufacture twenty diifereut sizes and styles of letters, and the per- 
fection attained in the making of the more difficult parts is truly wonderful. 
The "complete outfits," which contain within the limits of a small 
hand-trunk everything necessary to carry on a successful and very profitable 
business, are somewhat a specialty with them. Quality, quantity, and price 
considered, we believe they stand unrivaled. Besides all materials con- 
nected with the stencil business Messrs. Spencer & Co. also furnish key 
check dies, key checks, brass alphabets, canceling stamps, seals, embossing 

presses, etc. 

We are glad to know that certain rival claims having been satisfactorily 
adjusted, Messrs. Spencer & Co. are now on amicable terms with all other 
manufacturers of stencil goods. By this arrangement they have the 
advantages of several patents and a license in all patents which are of service 
in their business. 

Messrs. Spencer and Douglas are both young men of character and 
influence m the community, with whom the strictest honesty and integrity in 
business is not so much a matter of policy as of principle, and we wish them 
that success in future which they so richly deserve. 



Peksons writing to learn prices for advertising should be careful to 
observe the following directions : 

1st. To send a copy of their advertisement. 

2d. To state the space they wish it to occupy. (This should be given in 
lines, as the size of the square diifers almost in every paper.) 

3d. The length of time they wish the same inserted. 

By complying with the above a satisfactory answer will be obtained, 
while otherwise communications might be disregarded, as newspaper men 
are continually annoyed by parties who do not seem to know what they 
want, and to whose requests they are not in the habit of paying any attention.^ 

When such application is made to an advertising agency the name of 
the papers— or, if not known, the towns or cities should be given ; for the 
country is too large to admit of an inquiry of this sort, given in general 
terms, receiving a satisfactory answer. 



" Without the aid of advertisements I could have done nothing in my 
speculations. I have the most complete faith in ' printer's ink.' Advertising 
is the 'royal road to business.'" — Barnum. 



samup:l r. wells. 



The subject of this sketch is a good illustration of the general principl* 
that effort, persistent and well directed, is sure to make its mark, and that 
success is quite as likely to come from good common sense honestly and 
faithfully employed in a legitimate pursuit, though that pursuit be sur- 
rounded by difficulties and obstacles, as it is to be the result of genius, great 
talent, or some brilliant specific act of heroism or daring. In this broad 
land of ours, though full of sharp competition and organized selfishness 
clamoring for triumph, there is room and opportunity for high achievement 
and permanent success, and these are vouchsafed to honest endeavor, tem- 
perate living, consistency, and unwavering directness of labor. 

Samuel R. Wells was born in West Hartford, Connecticut, April 4, 
1820. While he was but a lad his father moved to northwestern New York 
and settled on the south shore of Lake Ontario, in the woods. The farm lay 
directly on the lake, and the beautiful bay. Little Sodus, stretched along the 
eastern front of it. Here he learned to fell the trees, to till the virgin soil, to 
hunt and trap the game of the forest, to navigate the beautiful bay, and cap- 
ture the fish, which were abundant, and not yet timid from the multiplicity 
of anglers. We may say in passing that this forest farm, then surrounded 
by long stretches of dense forest, has, with its neighborhood, submitted to 
the culture of modern times and been made to "bud and blossom as the 
rose," and that which is pleasant and of infrequent occurrence among pros- 
perous, self-made men, Mr. Wells has ))urchased the old homestead and has 
it under good husbandry, though he scarcely sees it once in twelve months. 
There is something pleasant to contemplate in the son who goes to the great 
metropolis to seek his fortune, and after securing the smiles of the fickle 
goddess returning to the home of his youth, purchasing and decorating the 
old homestead and surrounding the aged parents with all comforts of 
modern times, and thereby rendering their evening of life cheerful. 

While the tall and rather slender youth was toiling on the farm, or 
rather struggling to clear away the forest that the soil might become a farm, 
his thoughts were not wholly absorbed by the work of his hands. He often 
sighed for an education and a profession. But as he saw no way of obtain- 
ing the former while working on his father's farm, he resolved to learn a 
trade and either make his mark in the business world or acquire the meant 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 119 

■thereby for an education. He sought and obtained permission of his father 
to learn the trade of tanner and currier in the neighborhood of his home. 
He served faithfully and completed the regular a])prenticeship, and was 
.considered not only one of the best workmen, but became noted wherever 
he Avorked for his temperate habits, his quiet and gentlemanly manners, the 
excellency of his work, and the very great amount of it which he performed. 
As an evidence of his capability and faithfulness it may be remarked that he 
had attained to the position of foreman in a shop in Boston in which were 
employed forty hands, nearly all of whom were older than himself 

Having acquired by industry and frugality a considerable sum of money, 
considering the opportunity and comparatively small wages of the time, he 
commenced the study of medicine, and had already made arrangements to 
enter the medical department of Yale College when, meeting with the 
brothers O. S. and L. N. Fowler, the phrenologists, who were visiting 
Boston professionally, he took lessons from them and read with eager 
interest all the works then extant on the subject, and, traveling from Boston 
with them through the Eastern States, he became so deeply interested in 
phrenology that he adjourned the professional study of medicine, which he 
.afterward foimd time to resume. In the year 1843 he formed a copartner- 
ship with the Messrs. Fowler under the firm name of Fowlers & Wells, and 
entered the office of the Fowlers, already established at 131 Nassau street, 
New York. Mr. Wells now took charge of the office, and while the 
Fowlers were abroad on their lecturing tours he made phi'enological exam- 
inations, conducted the publication of the Phrenological Journal, then five 
years old, and commenced the systematic publication of books on phre- 
nology, physiology, and kindred subjects. 

Previous to the union of Mr. Wells with the Fowlers their afiairs had 
been managed withoxit system or the rules of usages of business, their time 
and thoughts having been mainly devoted to the professional department of 
the subject. Mr. Wells commenced a systematic course of advertising, and 
thus brought the subject into a shape to challenge the public attention and 
respect. Phrenology being then an unpopular subject, some viewing it with 
wonder, some Avith doubt and fear, some with skepticism and ridicule, and 
others with contempt or earnest opposition, he found it not a pathway of 
roses or a bed of down to establish it as a business and push it successfully 
as an enterprise. 

The store, which answered the purposes of a show-room for the cabinet 
and examination room, in a few years became too straightened for the use of 
the publishing department, and accordingly the adjoining store was j^rocured 
and an archway made to connect the two. 

As the business increased more helpers were required, till some twenty 
persons were engaged in conducting the difterent parts of the business, 
besides printers, binders, and stereotypers in other establishments. 

In 1844 Mr. Wells married Miss Charlotte Fowler, one of the sisters of 
his business partners. From the beginning she had been zealously working 
with her brothers to found phrenology and give it a prominent position 
before the public. She at once seconded the efforts of her husband ; they 
worked together in the office, and for tAventy-five years has this been con- 



120 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

tinned with unremitting industry. Huving no cliildren, this co-operativt 
ettbrt in the same cause has been at once agreeable and harmonious. No 
farmer and his wife have ever Avorked with more directness and co-ordina- 
tion to clear up and pay for a farm than has this couple to disseminate 
phrenology through the land and give it a permanency of institution. 

Besides the publication of the Phrenological Journal the firm has a largo 
number of books of standard character and value on phrenology, physiol- 
ogy, and physiognomy, and these have been read throughout the length and 
breadth of the land. The miner in his loneliness among the Sierra Nevada, 
or the pioneer in the forests or prairies of the great West, has thumbed tlieir 
works on mental science and learned thereby to know himself, and to 
respect and revere the names of those who have ministered to his mental 
enjoyments and opened to his aspirations a higher and better life. 

In 185-1: Mr. O. S. Fowler, having for a few years previous spent most of 
his time on a farm in the country, sold his entire interest in the establishment 
and retired from the firm, leaving with his former partners, L. N. Fowler 
and Mr. Wells, the cabinet, stereotype ]3lates, and all that belonged to the 
old firm, and they continued the business under the firm name of Fowler & 
Wells, the pl-ural being dropped on the retirement of the elder Fowler. 
By this time the establishment had so grown as to require assistants who 
were competent to conduct the business, and thereby permit the principals 
to be absent. Mr. Wells, with his associate, traveled throughout the United 
States and the North American British Provinces, lecturing in all the large 
cities, thus forming an extended acquaintance with the people and with the 
country. In 1860 they embarked for Europe, and for years traveled through 
England, Scotland, and Ireland, lecturing on their favorite themes, meeting 
everywhere with the most flattering success, and placing the science they 
teach on a higher basis in Europe than it had hitherto been supposed to 
occupy. During their combined labors in the old country the nature of 
their profession brought them in contact with the leading minds in all the 
spheres, professions, and pursuits of life; statesmen, poets, preachers, authors, 
artists, inventors, distinguished agriculturists, etc. They visited asylums 
for the insane, prisons, and wherever business called or professional inquiry 
invited. 

Mr. Wells returned to New York (leaving his associate in England, 
where he still remains) and engaged with renewed energy to give to the 
public the fruit of his enlarged experience, and, in addition to his labors on 
the Phrenological Journal from month to month, his works entitled New 
Physiognomy, How to Read Characters, and Wedlock, or The Right 
Relations of the Sexes, which have since appeared, are evidences of his 
research, industry, and the scientific spirit with which he is imbued. 

The Phrenological Cabinet or Museum, on Broadway, which the Messrs. 
Fowler & Wells have collected from all parts of the world, in conjunction 
with the book establishment, constitutes one of the marked points on that 
great thoroughfare, Broadway, and there is scarcely a boy ten years old in 
New York, who, being inquired of where the phrenological establishment is, 
would not promptly respond: "The great skull store is on Broadway, near 
Canal street." 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 121 

The special contribution which Mr. Wells brought to the chosen Held of 
his labor was a practical intellect, an eye for business, and urbanity of 
manners, which readily gave him ability to form new acquaintances, 
especially with business men and the editorial world, and for several years 
he devoted his attention mainly to the business department of the estab- 
lishment, and from a very small beginning he has contributed largely to the 
building up of an establishment which is known throughout the civilized 
world. His associates had spent their time chiefly in the lecture field. 
With Mr. Wells's accession the business took form and gave the proprietors 
a rank in the business world, and thereby contributed to give permanency 
and stability to the subject which they were laboring to promulgate. Mr. 
Wells is remarkable for industry, and indeed inclined to overwork; takes too 
little recreation, and but for his temperate habits and his correct mode of 
living would have been broken down and laid away long ago. When 
remonstrated with for overworking he replies that he who would teach 
others how to live must wear himself out or break down in the service, for 
the teacher must be so incessant in his labor that he can hardly carry out his 
own theories, especially in reference to rest and recreation. 

For the last seven years Mr. Wells has divided his time betw en editing 
the Phrenological Jonrnal, writing books for publication, lecturing, and 
delineating character. The Phreyiological Journal is circulated wherever 
the English language is spoken, and is exerting an immense influence on the 
life, mental training, and education of mankind. 

Notwithstanding the pressure of his professional duties and business en- 
gagements Mr. Wells finds time to devote to educational interests and public 
afiairs, to temperance, and to movements calculated to ameliorate the condi- 
tion of prisoners, the insane, and the poor. He takes a lively interest in 
mechanical inventions and all modern improvements and scientific discov- 
eries ; nor does he forget that he started life as a farmer, and has a taste for 
fine stock and improvements in agriculture, as his own well-stocked and 
highly-cultivated farm on the shore of Lake Ontario bears evidence. 

Mr. Wells stands six feet high, is straight and well built, has rather a 
large head, a profusion of black hair, which lies in handsome waves, though 
we observe of late slight traces of "the frost that never melts" creeping into 
his locks. His mind is of a practical turn, giving him a relish for facts and 
an anxious desire to see all that can add to his stock of knowledge or con- 
tribute to his enjoyment. He has naturally a strong religious tendency, his 
veneration and benevolence being inherent. He is highly social, and well 
calculated to adorn society. Possessed of a natural difiidence, from mod- 
erate self-esteem, he never wounds the pride or self-love of others by elbow- 
ing his way to the front rank uninvited, and he bears the honors which are 
accorded to him without giving ofience to those who would be glad to 
occupy his place. 



NEW YORK SUN. 



The history of low-priced journalism in America begins only from tli« 
third of September, 1833. On that day first rose the New York Sicn " to 
shine for all." It was a very small shine — only the size of a window-pane, 
dyspeptic in appearance, and without many persons to judge of the bril- 
liancy of its appearance. It did not resemble the sun of Austerlitz. It was 
of nearly the size that the Evening J'ost, now the most venerable of our 
dailies, and the one with broadest phylacteries, was at birth, and it probably 
contained as much news. Horace; Greeley was then a journejnnan printer, 
James Gordon Bennett was the laboring man on the old Courier and En- 
quirer^ and Henry J. Raymond was going to school. Slow and sure the 
dailies of that time were, full of ponderous disquisitions on the Bank and 
the tariff, and sleepy in the extreme. There were no correspondents abroad, 
and not commonly one in Washington ; telegraphs did not flash intelligence 
from one place to another in less than a second, and railroad and steamboat 
expresses were unknown. The mails from Europe were condensed for the 
columns of the New York newspapers of that day, and from Albany intelli- 
ligence was given a week after the events had happened. New York was 
then a little smaller than Baltimore is now, and somewhat larger than Pitts- 
burgh and its suburbs; but no such gazette Avas issued from Manhattan 
Island as to-day gi-aces the press of America in the pages of the Cotnniercial 
■of Pittsburgh. Recriminations and invectives were alarmingly prevalent, 
and the picture drawn by Charles Dickens in Martin Chuzzlewit was none 
too exaggerated for the day. Happily, such times are now past. 

It w^as amid such scenes tliat the New York iian was ushered into exist- 
ence. It was not a model sheet ; no paper could be that whose means did 
not allow more than an editor and three or four compositors, and its tone, 
we are sorry to say, was no better than that of the rest. Its first publisher 
was Benjamin H. Day, but the originator of the idea was named Sheppard. 
The man, however, to whom the pajier owed most of its success until a few 
years back was Moses Y. Beach. Pony expresses were of his founding, and 
carrier pigeons Avere his messengers. Opposed to him were soon found a 
multitude of cheaj)-priced dailies, out of which only two have survived. The 
Herald was founded three years after, and the Tribune eight, but after a 
brief time they raised their price to two cents a copy, at which they remained 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 13S 

till during the war. The weekly Sun was regarded as an excellent hebdom- 
adal for many years, but the influence of the paper on the public mind ceased 
about the time of the Mexican war, although its advertising patronage was 
excellent and its circulation was large. After this, until the reqent change 
in its proprietorship, no one thought of attaching any importance to its 
remarks on public events, or of disputing anything it said. It was not 
worth while. 

In 1867, some capitalists and newspaper men were looking around New 
York city for a newspaper to buy. It was essential that it should contain 
the news published by the Associated Press. As this body would admit no 
more partners, the choice was between the Express and the 8un. Of these 
the latter was by far the most valuable, had the greatest clientage, and was 
a morning paper. So it was purchased at a very high figure, and the Com- 
pany, of Avhich Mr. Charles A. Dana was the chief man, set to work to 
reorganize the paper. 

This was no easy task. The Sun needed a new building and new editors ; 
it needed a change in everything. The old Tammany Hall building, where 
so many meetings had been held for Jackson, Van Buren, Polk, Cass, Pierce, 
Buchanan, Douglas, and McClellan, was purchased in anticipation of the 
change, and carpenters, masons, and bricklayers quickly changed it to an 
imposing edifice crowned with a Mansard roof The Sun was ready for its 
new quarters, and in them it moved on the first of January, 1868, with a new 
force of editors and printers throughout. Mr. Dana controlled the editorial 
columns, assisted by Isaac W. England as managing editor. 

Charles Anderson Dana is a member of that New England family of 
which the poet and the author of " Two Years before the Mast" are also a 
part — a family which has had probably as many Harvard graduates from 
within itself as any other in the East. Mr. Dana was also at Harvard, but 
did not graduate, as the condition of his eyes prevented. He stood high 
in his class, however, and his attainments after being two years in college 
were probably more than those of most of the graduating students. After 
leaving he joined the Brook Farm Community, a dream of Arcadia. Brook 
Farm yet lives as the synonyme of unselfishness and as the embodiment of 
an attempt to form a society founded not on accidents of wealth and birth, 
but on the inherent goodness and truth of humanity. The sketches given 
by Emerson, by Hawthorne, and by Curtis, have all the interest of an event 
of the present week, with a poetry such as attaches to Sir Thomas More's 
Utopia or Marco Polo's travels in the East. They seem to be of us, yet 
divided by the absence of egotism and of self-interest from all that perplexes 
and moves the actual world. Of this phalanx, Mr. Dana was one of the 
youngest, and after its breaking up he became one of the soonest restored 
to the daily toil of life. Elizur Wright, now the great insurance actuary ol 
America, was then publisher of a paper in Boston called the Ckronotype^ and 
employed the late horticulturist as an assistant at five dollars a week. In 
February, 1847, he came to New York, and engaged as city editor on the 
Tribune^ at ten dollars, succeeding Mr. George G. Foster, one of the 
best local sketch writers ever in America, and the year after went 
to Europe as correspondent. This was at the time of the third French 



124 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Revolution, and also at a time of general upheaving throughout the 
whole continent of Eurojie. It required for this post a man of good acquaint- 
ance with the politics of Europe, and with the principal languages spoken 
there. This Mr. Dana possessed; French, German, Italian, and Spanish flow 
from his tongue as fluently as English, and he possesses a wide acquaintance 
with the literature which they j^reserve. 

On his return from Europe, Dana was made Mr. Greeley's principal 
assistant, at a salary of twenty dollars a week, which was afterwards 
gradually increased until it reached twenty-five hundred a year. It is notice- 
able that this salary, which is now equaled by that received by some one on 
more than a hundred of American newspapers, was then the highest paid by 
the press. Men of twenty years' experience, apt writers and cogent reasoners, 
were then only paid from twenty to thirty dollars a week, and it was impos- 
sible to go higher. The Times lately paid Mr. Bigelow nearly a thousand 
dollars a month. During Mr. Dana's labors on the Trih^me he found time 
to compile a volume of poetry from the works of eminent authors, and in 
1858 he and Mr. George Ripley commenced the American Cyclopedia. This 
voluminous work needed immense labor, and occupied a great portion of the 
time of the editors for several years, and was not concluded until after the 
withdrawal of Mr. Dana from the Tribune, which happened in April, 186'2. 
It was occasioned by dift'erence of political views, and his withdrawal was 
a subject of regret to nearly all the readers of the Tribune, which owed 
much of its force to his pungent pen. 

After leaving the Tribune he was appointed to several positions in the 
War Department, and finally he became Assistant Secretary of War, and 
rendered very material service to the Government by his excellent executive 
abilities. He had the confidence of his chief, and no imputation Avas ever 
uttered on his integrity. At the close of the war he went to Chicago, where 
he was editor of the Republican, a daily of M'hich much was hoped. After a 
year he sold out his interest and returned to New York, where, by his 
personal exertions, the company was formed which now conducts the Sim. 

It was foreseen by the managers of this paper that it would be impos- 
sible to retain all the readers if any change was made in its course, yet they 
boldly made the experiment, advertising both at home and abroad. At the 
time they took it the Stin had a circulation of about forty-eight thousand 
copies daily ; this diminished until it went down nearly to thirty-five thou- 
sand, when the onward wave led it up to forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, and 
even eighty thousand per day. At this last figure it stood on the first of 
January last. 

Such success has rarely been attained by newspapers. A thousand 
make the experiment where one attains such a result. The indomitable 
energy of the proprietors led them to continue their efforts, even when they 
seemed to be unproductive; they have not been relaxed since. When the 
change took place in the ownership it was largely advertised, and everybody 
knew of it. The ^Sun was printed on new type and good paper, every one 
could read it, and it had " all the news." Another secret of its success was 
that its reporters were picked men, not chosen on account of their relation- 
ship to the proprietors, but for their intrinsic merit. Mr. Dana's wide 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 125 

acquaintance with newspaper men gave him excellent opportmiities for 
making a choice of assistants, and he has improved it. No men work 
hardei^or give more productive retm-n for their labor than the two principal 
assistants on the Smi, and the paper shows the result. Its paragraphs are 
read, its correspondence is full of matter, and it always is up to, if not ahead 
of, other journals in local news. 

The business management of the Sim is under the charge of Isaac W. 
England, once city editor of the New York Tribune, and lately managing 
editor of the Sun. Under his supervision as editor the Sun achieved great 
results, and financially, matters have equally succeeded since. Mr. Eng- 
land is tall, and at present a little inclined to stoutness, of fair complexion 
and light hair. In business he is prompt and active, keeping a sharp over- 
sight on all the business of the paper, and pleasant and courteous in man- 
nei-. He has succeeded in making a profit of one hundred and sixty 
thousand dollars last year on a capital of three hundred and fifty thousand. 
Surely that is glory enough for one man. 



The New York Journal of Commerce says the story related of a mer- 
chant who made the choice of a husband for his daughters depend on which 
of the two suitors should write the best advertisement serves to illustrate the 
importance business men attach to judicious advertising. Steady, uniform, 
and persistent advertising unquestionably benefits every man in business. 
Classes of men sometimes object to advertising. It is a remarkable fact 
that in New York lawyers think it rather unprofessional to advertise, except 
in cases of removal, change of firm, or other special occurrences. They 
make a great error in this. There is not a day in the year when there are 
not many persons in and out of New York seeking legal advice, especially 
among the merchants and business men, without any clew to assist them 
even in making inquiries. Merchants in regular business learn by experience 
the importance of using the columns of a commercial paper for the systematic 
announcement of their business. 



According to the character or extent of your business, set aside a 
liberal percentage for advertising, and do not hesitate. Keep yourself 
unceasingly before the public ; and it matters not what business of utility 
you may be engaged in, for, if intelligently and industriously pursued, a 
fortune will be the vq&u\%.— Hunt's Merchant's Magazine 



WHAT IS WORTH DOING AT ALL IS WORTH DOING WELL. 



The following reasonable hints to business men, in relation to the " art 
of advertising," are just as true in one place as elsewhere : 

Advertising is an art, and that it is one that pays let the thousands in 
this country who have grown rich by it answer. We do not say that no 
man who has not properly advertised has prospered in business, but we do 
say that it is a rare case where any business might not have been greatly 
augmented by a judicious use of " printer's ink." 

What is advertising? The art of making your wares known; giving 
publicity to your business. You have your wares, others have wants. It is 
your interest to fill the wants with the wares — to bring producer and con- 
sumer, tradesmen and piirchaser, together. This is what signs are for, 
tastefully arranged store windows and the like. They are to captivate the 
eye. The eye is the sentinel of the will. Capture the sentinel and you 
carry the will. Impress the senses and you move the choice. The feet 
follow the eyes. See how they pause at the shop window, and how they 
covet what is in it. Some of them step in and inquire the price ; others step 
in and buy, not because they need the article, but because they had the 
money about them, and because the winning window won it aAvay from them. 

This is what an advertiser assaults, first and last of all, the eyes. It is 
in vain to reason with your customers. Customers do not reason, do not 
arrive at a purchase by the slow method of military " approaches," impelled 
by an elaborate ratiocination, but carry the coveted commodity by a sudden 
assault, pricked up to it by the indomitable bayonets of the artists" in 
advertising. 

It is this untiring, unremitting, everlasting, never-take-no-for-an-answer 
appeal to the eyes of the people who want their hair to grow, by the people 
who have something for sale which they say will make the hair grow, that 
carries the day, splatters the hair tonics over innumerable scalps, and puts 
fortunes in the bank to the credit of the — advertiser. 

This is the way to do it. Have a good article, an article that will do 
good, and then stick it at them. Hit them in the face with it, slash them 
over the eyes with it. This is the art of advertising. Say you have a hat — 
a good hat — a hat that is worth having on anybody's head. Well, put it ou 
•rerybody's head. You can do it by advertising it. Other hatters may 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 1S7 

make a living, you shall make a fortune — by advertising ! In all New York 
there is only one hatter. In Philadelphia there are imposing piles of brown 
stone owned by Dr. JajTie. They are built out of advertising. In New 
York there is a huge pile on Broadway, worth its weight in gold, and an 
acre of ground of fabulous costliness, the property of Dr. Brandreth. All 
of it goes to the credit of advertising. Brandreth's pills are household 
words — because Brandreth was an adept in advertising — only this and 
nothing more. There is proof on every hand, then, that there is money in 
advertising. But it can only be got out by " pegging away."' The first and 
chief, and almost the only, qualification for a successful advertiser is perti- 
nacity. To be the only hatter in town you have only to say you are, some- 
where where people see you say it. To have the only hair tonic, or pill, or 
bitters that the people need, you have only to poke their eyes with the 
assertion that you have. 

There is only here and there one in any branch of money-making that 
looms up and fills the public eye, and monopolizes the public purse. These 
are they who understand the art of advertising, and appreciate the indis- 
putable fact that the way to make money out of advertising is to stick to it. 

To make advertising pay, it must be stuck to with all the pertinacity 
that is indispensable to success in the prosecution of every other art. There 
are some men in this country who spend fifty thousand, and others who 
spend one hundred and fifty thousand dollars per annum for advertising. 
And every one of them is getting rich out of it. 



To obtain the full value of printer's ink, advertise. Do it in your own 
language, or if you cannot do that to suit you get some one better versed in 
the matter to help you, or come to the oflice with your ideas written down 
and it will be easy to put them into shape. But by all means advertise. 
Change often, and when your business admits of it make difterent features of 
it prominent in their turn ; to-day one thing, to-morrow or next week an- 
other, and then something else. Let your advertisements have something of 
the dash in them, without great exaggeration. Hundreds of fortunes have 
been made by advertising, and yet as an art it is but imperfectly understood. 



There is no instance on record of a well-sustained system of judicioua 
advertising failing of sucoess. 



S. S. SCRANTOX. 



Of all those who have contributed by their enterjjrise, energy, and 
business tact to extend the publication and sale of books by subscription, 
probably no man has done more than S. S. Scranton, of the firm of S. S. 
Scranton & Co., publishers, of Hartford, Conn. 

He was born in Connecticut about the year 1822, and is consequently 
about forty-seven years old at present, though few Avould take him to be 
more than forty, so carefully has he preserved himself from the ravages of 
time. His figure is as firm and full, his step as elastic, and his eye as bright 
and cheerful as in the first flush of his young manhood. The march of years 
has left few marks upon him, and he seems to be one of those favored ones 
who are reminded of the flight of time only by the memories that crowd 
thickly upon them when looking back over the record of their lives. 

Perhaps this excellent physical constitution is due to the fact that the 
early life of Mr. Scranton was passed on a small farm. The healthful labor 
which devolved upon him in this position built up his splendid physique, 
and nurtured instead of wasting the energies of mind and body which have 
made the success of his maturer life. It is an interesting fact that the 
majority of our self-made men have been country lads. Coming fresh and 
vigorous from their purer districts, they are more than a match for their 
half-developed and too frequently rum-poisoned rivals of the city. 

Mr. Scranton's opportunity for acquiring an education was limited. A 
country school, a fair sample of the rural schools of thirty years ago, pro- 
vided him with all the knowledge he was able to gain until the more pressing 
wants of his manhood forced him to make u]) by patient and persistent 
eflForts the deficiencies of his youth. 

He remained on the farm until he reached the age of twenty-two years. 
He then began to look about him for a more promising as well as a perma- 
nent employment. The city of New Haven was at this time one of the chief 
centres of this business, and some of its houses were very largely engaged in 
it. One of these firms; ajqireciating the native energy of Mr. Scranton, as 
well as his local reputation for industry, proposed to him to become a can- 
vasser for the sale of their books. The ofter was accepted after due 
consideration, and Mr. Scranton at once entered upon the discharge of his 
duties. His operations were confined to New England, and he set to work 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 129 

•with a will, canvassing on foot. He saw at a glance that the business in 
which he was engaged aftorded liim not only an opportunity of earning 
money by the sale of books, but also of studying the people with whom he 
mingled, of learning their wants and their peculiar views with regard to 
books. He went everywhere, his pleasant, genial ways making him a 
favorite with all classes, and his determined industry and shrewd business 
tact drawing upon him the favorable attention of the older men with whom 
he was thrown. When he stopped over night at a farm house, he was sure 
to win his way into the friendship of its inmates, and leave behind him such 
a favorable impression that he never failed to find a hearty welcome awaiting 
him on his return. Besides this, he sold only works of merit, and his 
customers learned to depend on his simple word as the best guarantee they 
could have. 

Ten years of such experience made him the best canvasser in New 
England, a reputation which brought him to the favorable notice of Mr. L. 
Stebbins, an energetic publisher of Hartford, who ofi"ered him an important 
position in his house. Mr. Scranton accepted the place, and from this 
beginning rose in a short time to be a partner of Mr. Stel.'bins. He proved 
himself a valuable man in every position filled by him. Mr. Stebbins soon 
found that he was perfectly safe in entrusting his interests in his partner's 
hands, and Mr. Scranton thus became the life of the business. Many 
important changes were efiTected in the mode of conducting the subscription 
trade, Mr. Scranton's vast experience with the public as a canvasser having 
acquainted him with the necessities of the business, and with the best and 
most expeditious way of bringing his books to the notice of purchasers. 

Some years later, the interest of Mr. Stebbins was purchased by other 
parties, and a joint stock association was formed under the title of the 
American Publishing Company of Hartford. Mr. Scranton became the 
chief manager. The business of the Company was left almost entirely in 
his own hands, the Board of Directors finding that the best they could do 
at their regular meetings was to endorse his course and authorize him to 
act according to his best judgment in the future. The operations of the 
Company grew larger every day until they became the first in importance 
of any similar firm in the land. That this is no exaggerated statement will 
be seen from the following authoritative returns of the sales of a few of the 
books issued by them. Headley's History of the Rebellion reached a sale of 
about three hundred thousand volumes, being in itself a fortune for both 
author and publisher, and the Secret Service, by Albert D. Richardson, the 
popular Tribune correspondent, met with a sale of over eighty thousand 
volumes in a single year. Such results as these are the very best evidence 
-of the skillful and enterprising management of Mr. Scranton that could 
be given. 

About the close of the year 1865 Mr. Scranton withdrew from the 
management of the American Publishing Company and formed a new part- 
nership with Mr. W. N. Matson. The new firm assumed the style of 
S. S. Scranton & Co., and began their operations under the most favorable 
auspices. 

9 



l^y THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

The first book issued by Messrs. Scranton & Co. was ihe Women oi 
the War, which in a few months reached a sale of more than fifty thousand 
copies. Subsequently they brought out a History of American Methodism, 
by Kev. M. L. Scudder, D. I)., of which many thousand volumes were sold 
in the course of twelve montlis. A Life of Grant, by Hon. Henry C. Deming, 
proved a handsome success, in spite of the numerous rivals against which it 
had to contend in both the regular and subscription trades. Messrs. Scranton 
& Co. were also the first to issue the popular edition of Dr. Wm. Smith's 
Dictionary of the Bible. Other houses predicted a failure for this work, 
but the wisdom of the course of Messrs. Scranton & Co. and the popularity 
of their edition is attested by the tact that, though nearly seventy thousand 
copies have been disposed of, the book is still selling rapidly. Lately they 
are employing their extensive resources and business capacities in publishing 
the Unabridged People's Edition of the Life and Epistles of St. Paul, w^hich 
bids fair to exceed in its sale any of their former publications. A Practical 
Family Bible, adapted to the wants of all classes, has also met with an 
extensive sale in their hands. 

The system of selling books by subscription, though liable, like every- 
thing else, to abuse, is undoubtedly of great public benefit. In no other 
way can works adapted to popular use be so successfully and economically 
brought before the whole people. This is well understood by the leading 
publishers, who, in spite of its tendency to bring down the price of books, 
are rapidly adopting it. The Harpers, the Appletons, Charles Scribner & 
Co., and the leading houses of Boston, are all provided with a subscription 
department to their business, which they use to great advantage and with 
great profit. There can be no doubt that a very few years will find the 
subscription system in general practice throughout the country. One feature 
alone would make it indispensable — its facilities for circulating books in 
remote rural districts in which the publications of the regular trade are 
never seen. As the country develops and our population increases, this 
branch of the book trade must grow proportionately larger and important. 

No business is so thoroughly dependent upon advertising as the sub- 
scription book trade. In order to conduct it successfully, it is necessary to 
keep the public constantly informed of the fact that such publications as it 
has in hand are oft'ered to them at moderate prices. Of course the first 
requisite is to have some work worthy of the public patronage. Having 
this to start with, a judicious system of announcing the book is sure to 
create a demand for it. Seeing such announcements of books in their family 
newspapers day after day, or week after week, has never yet failed to awaken 
a deep interest in them on the part of the public and to pave the way for a 
ready sale. We are aware that there are those who will receive these 
assertions with a considerable amount of doubt, if not with a total unbelief; 
but two facts are significant, the most successful book houses, regular or 
subscription, in the country, are those whose advertising bills are the 
heaviest, and no really meritorious work well advertised in llic subscrij.tlon 
trade has ever failed of success. 

An incident which occurred many years ago may perhaps lie at the 
bottom of Mr. Scranton's faith in the benefits of advertising. One of his- 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 131 

former partners, about to depart on a long business journey, arranged with 
him the details of such operations as were to be conducted during his (the 
partner's) absence. His last words were to caution Mr. Scranton not to 
throw away his money in advertising. For some time Mr. Scranton regarded 
this advice, and refused all offers to advertise his publications in the news- 
papers. Business was dull and almost disheartening, and after reflecting on 
^ the matter for some time he determined to risk forty dollars in advertising 
one of his books. He did so, and carefully watched the result. He has 
since declared that this small sum led to a profit of over one thousand 
dollars on the books sold by means of these advertisements. This settled 
the question with him, and since then he has been one of the most liberal, 
but still one of the most cautious advertisers in the country. Caution is a 
great safeguard, no doubt, but in Mr. Scranton's case a little less would be 
beneficial. Had he been a bolder, a more daring man, there can be hardly a 
doubt that with his unusual business qualities he would have been the 
possessor of a fortune twice as large as that which to-day would enable him 
to lay aside the cares of business, should he see fit to do so. The probability 
is, however, that he will die in harness. Like Stewart and Vanderbilt, he 
finds a positive happiness in hard work. Idleness is hateful to him. 

He is now in the prime of life and is the possessor of most robust 
health. His disposition is remarkably cheerful and evenly balanced. He 
is a happy husband and father, possessing an unusually interesting family 
and a happy home, where courtesy and hospitality engage the visitor's 
warmest regard, and make him loath to depart. He is one of the happy, as 
well as one of the fortunate men of our day, and his life afibrds a striking 
example of the success and honors which, under our wise and beneficent 
institutions, are the sure rewards of honesty, industry, and conscientious 
energy in business. 

Take courage, young man, striving to make your way in the world. The 
life of this man shows you what you can accomplish if you will work as 
he has done. 



Readee, if you have a good live advertisement running through our 
own or any other good list, you have a hundred thousand servants out at 
work for you, whether you wake or sleep, whether you be sick or well. No 
monarch's slaves ever scattered at his bidding so fleetly or faithfully, or in 
such bewildering numbers, as the literary messengers that bear your indi- 
vidual word to the people of this great nation. — Inside Track. 



Quitting advertising in dull times is like tearing out a dam because 
the water is low. Either plan will prevent good times from ever coming. 



STEINWAY & SONS. 



Go through one of the fashionable streets of any of our great cities and 
listen to the tinkle-tinkle of the piano. Go into another street and hear it 
repeated ; try the experiment in another city and you will still find it the 
same. The piano is everywhere, from the cottages of the poor to the 
palaces of the rich, in city and country, and in native and foreign homes. 
Three hundred manufacturers in our land are engaged in this branch of busi- 
ness, employing fifty thousand men, and turning out twenty-five thousand 
instruments per year. Every hotel has from one to a dozen, every boarding 
school from six to thirty, and there are thousands of places besides where 
two or three may be found. The sound of the piano in the United States 
never ceases. Before the last music-hall in San Francisco closes for the 
evening the pupils in boarding schools in Maine have caught up the melody 
and repeat it until midnight. A business that is large enough to supply all 
these various instruments cannot be small. Large capital is employed, long 
experience, and the greatest skill. 

Among these great houses Steinway & Sons are unsurpassed. Two 
thousand instruments are yearly furnished to the trade, and the clear and 
brilliant tones of their pianos are known in every concert room in the United 
States. Their success has been owing to a careful management of their 
business, and a uniform goodness of the article manufactured, together with 
continuous advertising. 

The head of the firm, Henry Steinway, is a German, and with his sons 
emigrated to the United States in the year 1.S50. The youngest son was but 
fourteen years old at the time when the family reached New York. Mr. 
Steinway was for over three years employed as a journeyman after his arrival 
in this country, being desirous of learning the American metliods of manu- 
facture. His cai)ital was small, being at that time only equivalent to the 
value of fifty pianf)S at manufacturer's prices, and it was not until after care- 
fully examining the market and studying its capabilities tliat the first instru- 
ment was made. It was well done ; pianists found that its soft, elastic touch 
was followed by tlie fullest and most liarmonious tones, and they had no 
dilliculty in selling it. A few journeymen were employed, and with the 
combined exertions of the family succeeded in making for the next two 
years one piano a week. They advertised their business, and when the 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 133 

Crystal Palace in New York opened they placed one of their best instrvi- 
ments there. It attracted universal attention, and brought the Steinways 
into communication with the great public outside of New York. Their 
sales have increased, their methods of manufacture have improved, and 
their capital has enlarged, so that they not only now make as good a piano 
as any in the world, but sell more. The merits of their handiwork were 
amply noticed in the Paris Exposition of two years ago — a year in which 
their house advertised more than fifty thousand dollars' worth, with propor- 
tionate results. They have a magnificent hall up-town connected with 
their store, and the members of the firm are still as industrious and pains- 
taking as they were when in the Vaterland. 



Advertising Aphorisms. — If you don't mean to mind your business, 
it will not pay to advertise. 

Bread is the stafi" of human life, and advertising is the staff" of life in 
trade. 

Don't attempt to advertise unless you have a good stock of a meritorious 
article. 

Newspapers advertisements are good of their kind, but they cannot take 
the place of circulars and handbills. 

Handbills and circulars are good of their kind, but they cannot take the 
place of newspaper advertisements. 

No bell can ring so loudly as a good advertisement. People will 
believe what they see rather than what they hear. 

Bonner, for several successive years, invested in advertising all the 
profits of the preceding year. Now see where he is ! 

The wise man of Scripture evidently did not refer to advertising when 
he said, " Cast thy bread upon the waters and after many days thou shalt 
see it again," or he would have added, "with interest." 



The Advertiser's Gazette, published by Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 40 
Park Row, is not only a useful and almost indispensable publication, but a 
very interesting one as well. Those who want to advertise — and every 
business man of good sense does want to do so largely — will be able to find 
out more with regard to the newspapers of the country from this periodical 
than from any other. 



J. B. BURR. 



Among those standing pre-eminent, and holding a deservedly high rank 
in the subscription-book publishing business of the country, is Mr. J. B. 
Burr, of Hartford, Conn., whose career has been no less eventful and marked 
than his success is complete and deserved. Though still a young man, he 
has won for himself a reputation for business tact and ability in every degree 
commendable, and of which he and his friends may well be proud. 

Mr. Burr was born in Middlesex county, Connecticut, in the year 1^35, 
and is consequently now thirty-five years of age. But few men have com- 
pressed so much hard labor, successful adventure, and world-wide travel into 
so few years. He remained with his father, who was an extensive iarmer, 
working hard and zealously until his twentieth year, acquiring in the mean- 
time the substantial common-school education which New England knows 
so well how to give, and which our hero so completely mastered. 

Being urged to solicit for subscription books, and his ambition panting 
for a wider field of struggle than the farmer's life could ofier, he bade 
adieu to the scenes of his boyhood, and entered upon that career which 
was eventually to bear him with attending success to the very " ends of the 
earth." He went first to Canada, where several months were very success- 
fully employed, and after his return from this trip to Connecticut, having 
found the business so lucrative and congenial to his tastes, he engaged again 
in its pursuit, going to Chicago and Middle Illinois, where he spent four or 
five months with satisfactory results, and from thence pressed on to New 
Orleans. At this point he diverged for a time from the more legitimate 
path of his vocation, and proceeded on a pleasure trip to Cuba, '' keeping an 
eye" to business at the same time (as all such men will and must), so that 
his voyage eventually resulted in a business succes.s. 

After a second visit to Connecticut, and a few months passed with 
friends there, he decided to try his fortune in tlie tar West, beyond 
the Mississippi. Starting for Texas l)y the way of New Orleans, he 
spent six months in disposing of his literary wares to the people of that 
State. Returning again to Connecticut, he varied the point of his compass 
and pushed otf for Nova Scotia and Newibundland, spending five months 
in these places. From Newfoundland he returned to Hartiord, and pro- 
posed to the pid)lisluug house for which he was operating to take a trip 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 135 

%o the British West Indies and South America, but the house ridiculed 
the project, and it was only after great persistency that Mr. Burr gained 
his point. Despite all their apprehensions, and justifying his sagacity 
and self-resource, the result was pre-eminently a profitable one to the 
Company, and largely increased their respect for and confidence in the 
judgment and enterprise of Mr. Burr. Six months in that country, hitherto 
unexplored by book canvassers, enabled him to retire for a time from 
the soliciting business and engage in other pursuits. But after a while 
'' he returned to his old love," the book business, and made a trip to the far- 
'0& land of Australia. This was in the spring of 1861. There he was suc- 
cessful, every day reaping golden harvests. He passed nearly a year in that 
.country, returning to Connecticut by the way of Europe, and in 1862 set out 
for California with the intention of taking a steamer to Australia. Not find- 
ing one ready to sail, he concluded to make California the field of his opera- 
tions for the time being. Combining business with pleasure, he visited the 
gold diggings, the Yo Semite Valley, and the larger cities of the State. From 
California he went to New Zealand, spending, however, but a few weeks 
there, and then starting for Australia a second time, and for Van Diemen's 
Land. Repeating his old success in Australia, and equally fortunate in Van 
Diemen's Land, he left the former country for England in 1863. There he 
remained nearly a year, making an acquaintanceship which has proved 
advantageous in his subsequent business. In 1864 he returned to America, 
and soon entered as partner the publishing house in Hartford which 
eventually became the American Publishing Company. Whether Mr. Burr's 
modesty would permit or forbid him to accept any of the credit therefor, it 
is a fact that during his connection with the Company the house was 
unusually successful. He finally disposed of his interest there, and started, 
with Mr. B. E. Buck, of Hartford, the combined book-publishing and real 
estate business, he managing exclusively the book department and Mr. Buck 
taking charge of the real estate division. Here Mr. Burr's clear business 
judgment again manifested itself, in his choice of Mr. Buck as partner, their 
business having been signally successful. 

The first book which J. B. Burr & Co. published was Elliott's Holy 
Land, of which, through the means -in part of judicious advertising, they 
sold a large number of copies, the work having still a lucrative sale. 

Among other works they afterwards published Smith's Dictionary of 
the Bible, although other houses were selling large numbers of books under 
the same name. But Mr. Burr, acquainting himself with the facts, saw that 
an edition of the work which should embrace many improvements and 
advantages must sell in spite of an already well-occupied field, and the 
result was that over fifty thousand copies of their edition were rapidly 
disposed of, and the book as a standard work is still and constantly called 
for by the public. 

Another of their works is Howland's Grant as a Soldier and a States- 
man. A year or two ago the market was stocked with no less than fifteen 
Lives of Grant, most of them proving disastrous failures to their respective 
publishers ; but Burr & Co. " did well " with their book, which, in the fac« 
<of the fearful competition that existed, is liigh praise. 



136 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Passing for brevity's sake over other matters, we next note Mr. Burr's 
chief financial venture in the book business. Conceiving that a book which 
would give the world a knowledge of life in the great metropolis as it is 
would be acceptable to the public, Mr. Burr went to New York and laid his 
project before a gentleman Avell known in the literary world, who, foreseeing 
its success, entered into an engagement upon it, but becoming ill and unable 
to perform his contract, recommended to Mr. Burr the Kev. Matthew Hale 
Smith, whom he sought out and found at the Astor House. As an instance 
of his frequently rapid business operations, it may properly be remarked 
here that he laid his plans before Mr. Smith in sufficient detail, secured his 
services, entered into a written agreement with him, and was on his way 
home to Hartford in less than two hours. Thus rapidly were the outlines 
di'awn, and the project completed of one of the greatest successes of the 
times in the publishing business. The book, " Sunshine and Shadow in New 
York," captivated the public; and though its price varied, according to 
bindings, etc., from three to five dollars, nearly one hundred thousand copies 
of it were sold in less than one year. Other books under similar titles, and 
some of them largely fashioned after theirs, were issued in hot haste as soon 
as the success of Sunshine and Shadow became certain, and were pushed 
into vigorous competition with the latter — flattering compliments to Mr. 
Burr's sagacity in projecting this work, although we suspect he would have 
preferred a clear field an<l its substantial results to all the " empty sound 
of such flattery. 

Mr. Burr has been the most liberal advertiser of all the Hartford pub- 
lishers. His bills for advertising Sunshine and Shadow could not have fallen 
short of ten thousand dollars, and it was as much by the means of his more- 
extensive advertising as by the superiority of his book that he was enabled ta 
distance all competitors so completely. He adopted the system of doing 
his own business from his own office, and paying for advertising with that 
portion of his profits which is usually devoted to commissions to general 
agents. 

Mr. Burr is very non-committal in his business transactions and scrupu- 
lous to carry out all promises. Promises from him are hard to obtain. He 
is of medium size, well knit together, lithe, rapid in action, of the nervo- 
bilious temperament, with good breadth of shoulder and ample lungs — a 
well-made man, with dark, almost black hair, beard and eyes, the latter 
securely defended beneath unusually projecting brows. That Mr. Burr has 
all the suavity and address necessary for the successful business man is toe 
apparent in what we have given above of his history to need further asser- 
tion. In his dealings with others he is scrupulously accurate in detail, 
winning respect for his unswerving honesty and endearing himself to his 
employees. So young a man as he must have, if he lives, a remarkable 
business future before him, and we are sure that he who shall in after years 
add to this our meagre biography of Mr. Bin r will have many interesting 
facts to chronicle of the career of one of America's cntci prising and successful 
business men. 



ADVERTISING. 



Business men of all classes have long admitted the advantages to be 
derived from a well-regulated system of advertising. To succeed in any 
undertaking one must make himself and his cause known to the public whose 
patronage he solicits and upon whose favor he depends. Failing in this, he 
fails in everything ; business seeks other channels, whither it is directed by 
the agencies now in operation for that purpose ; his coffers remain empty ; his 
customers are few, and his sales unremunerative. Experience teaches us that 
such a man rarely succeeds. However brilliant his prospects may appear, 
however zealous he may be in his work, and however eager for advancement, 
if he neglects the elementary step of introducing himself by some method 
to the people whose wants he would supply, they will ever remain in igno- 
rance of his attainments or his merchandise, and their trade and custom will 
flow to other marts already established by the means he disdains to avail 
himself of So true has this become at the present day that advertising and 
success are almost synonymous terms when applied to labor or industry. 

Some writer on this subject has ventured to remark that there is not a 
single instance of the failure of a well-regulated system of advertising. We 
believe this to be true. Common sense teaches it, and every day's expe- 
rience confirms it, while the observation of each one who has ever examined 
the subject, or who will now take the trouble to do so, must lead him to the 
same conclusion. The rule holds good in all departments, and in every 
place. It is as essential in the town as in the country, nor is the latter in 
any way excluded by the former. Show us your village paper, and without 
further knowledge we will tell you from a glance at its local columns who 
are its active, energetic business men. The man that advertises shows not 
only a business talent above his neighbors, but he may be at once reckoned 
among the independent, generous, and public-spirited of the community. 
He who hides his light under a bushel, when such advantages as those at 
present afforded are so freely offered him, does not deserve to succeed. He 
is and always vfill be deservedly ranked among those who make a failure of 
life. 'Twill do no good for such an one to mourn over the results, or mur- 
mur at fickle Dame Fortune ; it is himself, and himself only, that is in fault. 
No man occupies so low a spoke in fortune's wheel but that he may with 
persistency and effort raise himself if not to an eminent, at least to a 



138 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

desirable position in the business community, and prove a living example of 
the success sure to attend upon him who helps himself. Fortune is not so 
fickle as we are inclined to believe. Our own faults are too often laid to her 
charge. 

Admitting, then, the necessity to business men of an extensive business 
acquaintance and wide reputation, we are next to consider the best means of 
attaining so desirable an end. The custom of many years, which we know 
makes the law, as well as the experience and example of all practical and 
thorough-going communities, furnishes the same road thereto — a systematic 
and energetic course of advertising. It will not fail, it will be successful, 
for we know from facts and figures established beyond dispute that he who 
casts his bi'ead upon these waters is sure in return to reap a ricli and an 
abundant harvest. 

There are difterent methods of reaching the same end, yet we do not 
consider them all equally judicious or profitable ; money can be thrown away 
in this as in other undertakings, and so it behooves the advertiser not only 
to place himself in the best but also in the most judicious light before the 
public upon whom he is dependent. Many, as every one who passes 
through our streets, sojourns in the country, or travels our railroads well 
know, seek to do this by posters, handbills, the paint-pot and the brush ; yet 
we doubt if one ever stops to peruse the i:)0Ster, or more than cast his eye 
over the letters imprinted by the brush. The former is among the things 
that were, after the first rain-storm, and the latter are obliterated or ren- 
dered illegible by a thousand dificrent causes constantly at work. A 
circular through the post-otHce meets with a still less number of readers; 
a single glance at its contents, coupled Avith the fact that it is only a circular, 
prevents a further examination of its merits and condemns it on the spot to 
a place among the rubbish. The only source left is the newspaper, and this 
is the sufficient and the generally adopted medium. It is read by all, and its 
influence and irajiortance in this and kindred matters is now so well estab- 
lished as to render any extended remarks thereon entirely superfluous. 
Above all others the local paper takes the lead in importance as an adver- 
tising medium. It finds its way, free of postage, to every village in its 
county, and is read in nearly every house. It circulates throughout the 
entire State and in most cases far beyond its confines. There is no trouble 
to the advertiser in thus proclaiming his business or occupation, yet through 
its pages he introduces himself as he could not by any other method. And 
then, too, the advertising columns of a country paper are read with as much 
interest as any other part, and the whole is perused by many an eager eye. 
It is estimated that live persons on an average read every number issued 
from the country press ; and when we say read we mean advertisements and 
all. Unlike the city, where there is a single hasty glance for the news or the 
markets, the country paper is carefully scanned as the reflex of the outside 
bustling W(^rld and it thus becomes the cheapest and the most valuable 
advertising medium for every one who desires to reach the people and make 
himself known to all classes. It matters not wiiat the business may be nor 
how remote from the oftice of publication. Efjual attention will in all cases be 
drawji thereto, and beneficial results will surelv follow a notice in its columns. 



S. N. BROWN & CO. 



This firm are well-known manufacturers of wheels and wheel material 
in Dayton, Ohio, who were among the few who were lucky in making 
money out of the velocipede mania. This rage for riding on two wheels 
seems to have sprung up as suddenly as a new song, and to have disappeared 
as quickly, leaving nearly all who had anything to do with their manufacture 
to suflTer severe losses. Brown & Co. commenced business in 1847, with 
two men to do all the work, and having but one room. They now employ 
from fifty to sixty men constantly at work, and their business requires two 
large buildings, one three and the other five stories high, both being kept in 
constant use. Their trade extends from Portland, Maine, to San Francisco, 
and from St. Paul to Memphis, with sales also in England and Prussia. A 
premium was taken by them at the World's Fair in London, in 1862, and 
space was applied for at the Exposition in Paris, in 1867, but when the 
time came to send, they were so busy with orders that it was impossible to 
spare the goods and do their customers justice. This was in bicycle times. 
As this branch of industry was just then springing up, it occurred to this 
enterprising firm that it would be a good idea to manufacture the wheels. 
They did so, and advertised the fact broadcast in over a thousand news- 
papers, and the result showed the value. In two months they sold of this 
one article alone over sixteen thousand dollars' worth, and this act also 
brought them a great deal of indirect work from persons who had noticed 
their advertisements. They had the good sense also to see when the excite- 
ment was about to die out, and withdrew without loss. One very prominent 
feature in the management of this firm has been that they have always 
produced good articles, so that an order is likely to be repeated, and their 
good treatment of workmen has been proverbial. 



JAMES VICE. 



The progress and refinement of a people are made evident by 
their home surroundings as much as by their dress, scientific and social 
accomplishments, and religious regard for the Creator. The man^ 
therefore, who honestly disseminates the seeds of flowers and plants 
with which to adorn the homes of the land is one of God's OAvn ministers 
of good to man. Such a man is James Vick of Rochester, New York. 
Born in the suburbs of Portsmouth, England, in 1818, he came to this 
countiy with his father's family in 1833. His early ambition was to become 
an author, but the necessity of labor for daily support gave him little oppor- 
tunity to apply himself thereto ; and although he occasionally got an article 
inserted it was not remunerative, and he therefore abandoned literature as 
a life profession, although writing has been and still is a propensity which 
will crop out whenever he has any new item of value worth giving to the 
world. He also had a fancy for the printing business, and in early life con- 
nected the two together as inseparable, a fallacy he soon discovered when, 
soon after arriving in New York, he entered a printing ofiiee for the purpose 
of learning the art, at which he worked for several years. Finally, his 
inborn love of flowers caused him to seek a position and location where, in 
near connection with his daily labors at the case, he could employ his leisure 
hours in the care and study of flowers and flowering plants. Hence he 
removed to Rochester, in 1835, and engaged as a printer in setting ty])e for 
the Genesee Farmer^ then published by Luther Tucker, now the publisher of 
the Country Gentleman, Albany. Here in a small garden he commenced 
anew the practice of his childhood by raising flowers yearly from seed ; and 
although his success was such, and the demand for seeds from his seedlings 
so great as to compel him, as it were, after a time, to enter the seed business 
proper, yet he says that he " has never produced so good pinks, carnations, 
and picotees as he did when only ten or twelve years old." Here, occupied 
in setting type a certain number of hours daily for the Genesee Farmer, and 
spending the balance of his time in growing, studying, and writing about 
flowers, plants, and horticulture generally, he saw the Fari/ter })assed from 
Mr. Tucker's to D. D. T. Moore's hands ; and soon after Mr. Moore com- 
menced the publication of the Rural Neio-Yorker Mr. Vick assumed the 
publication of the Fanner, and continued it until January, 1853. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 141 

It will be remembered that in January, 1852, Andrew J. Downing, the 
then editor of the Horticulturist^ was drowned near Yonkers, while on a 
passage from Newbiirgh to New York; and soon after the publisher of 
that journal, trembling and fearful, with little conception of the wants and 
impulses of the American people, gave notice of a wish to sell. Mr. Vick, 
with an intuitive perception, hesitated not a moment in becoming its proprie- 
tor; and in January, 1853, removed the publication office of the Horti- 
culturist to Rochester, and there, with Mr. P. Barry, a well-known and 
competent horticulturist, as its editor, continued its publication until, as 
we have before said, the demand on him for rare and choice flower seeds 
induced him to dispose of all publication matters and devote his whole time 
to an interest that seemed to suit especially his talents and knowledge — a 
course advised by his friends. 

In January, 1857, he commenced editing the horticultural department 
of the jRural Ne in- Yorker, which position he held until 1862, when his seed 
business demanded so much of his time that he was obliged, greatly to the 
regret of thousands who hold those volumes, and weekly read his practical 
<;ontributions thereto, to discontinue it. He was for several years Secretary 
of the American Pomological Society, which office, with pleasant sarcasm, 
he tells, "was next to being President of the United States." He was for a 
time Secretary of the Genesee Valley Horticultural Society; also Secretary 
of the Western New York Hoi'ticultural Society, of which he is now the 
President. 

Like everything else in this country where energy, industry, and intel- 
ligence combine in its direction and management, the garden of James Vick 
has grown from less than a quarter of an acre to seventy-five acres, and the 
product and rarity of flowers from seeds grown by his own hands or under 
his directions have come to number so much that they are astonishing. 
Commencing as early as 1850 to import seeds and bulbs from England, 
France, and other parts of the world, according as he read of a new or 
beautiful production, he now has standing orders to send him, without 
regard to cost, each, all, and every new and rare seed or bulb ; and this he 
does surely knowing and relying upon an intelligent and appreciative public 
for his recompense. 

Mr. Vick's town office and warehouse for distribution is about eighty by 
one hundred and twenty feet, four stories high, and thoroughly fitted and 
arranged, floor by floor, for the perfect labors that belong to a careful 
putting up of and filling orders for seeds. In the busy season some seventy- 
five young ladies are employed in the discharge of duties or labor that can 
readily be performed by woman without overtaxing her sti-ength. About 
thirty men are employed for the more laborious and rude portions of the 
work, such as the receiving and delivering of boxes, hoisting, storing, etc. 
The amount of sales, yearly, foots up hundreds of thousands of dollars ; the 
number of letters received is from one thousand to eighteen hundred a day, 
or about one-quarter of all received at the Rochester post-office ; and it takes 
four to six persons steadily emj^loyed in opening and filling orders, and as 
many more in answering correspondence under Mr. Vick's personal 
direction. 



142 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Mr. Vick is known as one of our most enterprising and skillful adver- 
tisers, and his great increase in business is largely to be attributed to his use 
of that great and powerful lever of modern civilization, the press. His notices 
are not long, but they attract attention and invite correspondence, and the 
beauty of the floral productions of his gardens are sufficient to induce any 
one to Avish to purchase when they shall have arrived to inspect his stock. 
Mr. Vick is distinguished for his kindly disposition and for that love of the 
weak and the unfortunate characteristic of the heart of a good man, showing 
that the favors of Providence have not been unworthily bestowed nor are 
likely to be badly used. 



We consider the agency plan the best both for advertiser and pub- 
lisher, where they are strangers to each other, as being the safest, and causing 
less anxiety and trouble as to whether the parties on either side are good 
and responsible, and will carry out their contracts in good faith. — Dover^ 
N. H.y Gazette. 



Rule for Advertising. — Don't advertise unless you have something 
worth buying. A great many persons suppose advertising alone is sufficient. 
This is nearly as bad an error as to suppose that having the goods is suffi- 
cient alone. You must do both — have the goods, and let people know yoi^ 
have them. 



A DOUHLK column once a year is not so good as a square fifty-two timeK 
a year. A furious shower does not soak in so well as a steady rain. The 
highest praise Artemus Ward had for George Washington was that he 
"never slopped over." 



SETH W. FOWLE & SON. 



This well-known house was founded by the late Seth W. Fowle, who 
was born in the town of Mason, N. H., July 25, 1812, where he lived but 
a short time, as his parents soon afterwards removed to Cambridge, Mass. 
When he was ten years of age his father died, and he was sent to live with 
some friends of the family in Sudbury, Mass., where he remained attending 
school until he was nearly fourteen, when he went to Boston, and was 
apprenticed to his brother James, who was doing a good business as an 
apothecary on the corner of Green and Leverett streets. It was here that 
the character which he bore through life was formed. Obliged to work 
early and late, and called up at all hours of the night to prepare prescriptions, 
he found little or no time for amusement or for association with others of 
his age. He gave his whole mind to his business, and, being always at his 
post endeavoring faithfully to do his duty by forwarding his brother's 
interests, he became accustomed to habits of industry which clung to him as 
long as his health was spared. By close attention to business, neglecting 
no opportunity of acquiring knowledge relative to it, he soon became 
thoroughly acquainted with the nature and uses of the various drugs, and 
became very expert in the difficult and responsible duty of compounding 
them. He remained with his brother until he was nearly twenty-one, when, 
with his assistance, he purchased the stand on the corner of Prince and 
Salem streets, one of the oldest drug establishments in Boston, which for 
many years had been occupied by the celebrated Dr. Fennelly, and whose 
once elegant sign of the golden statue of ^sculapius still remains on the 
corner. Here he remained about ten years, during which time, by his 
industry and economy, his thorough knowledge of his business, and the fact 
that he always made friends of those who were brought into contact with 
him, he was quite successful. But he was too ambitious to remain here 
always. Being accustomed to purchase his drugs of wholesale dealers, he 
soon began to inquire of himself why he could not make his purchases of 
the same parties of whom the druggists bought, and thus make a doift)le 
profit, and in 1842 he sold out to his youngest brother Henry D. Fowle, 
who had learned the business with him and who still continues at the place, 
and connected himself with Joseph M. Smith, who for some years had been 
established as a wholesale and retail druggist on Washington street, opposite 



144 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

School street, where they continued two years under the lirni name of Smith 
& Fowle. It was during this period that Dr. Wistar's Balsam of Wild 
Cherry was introduced into New England. This well-known remedy for 
throat and lung complaints was first prepared about 1830, by the celebrated 
Dr. Henry Wistar, and for a number of years had been put up by Williams 
& Co., of Philadelpliia, during which time it had quite a large sale in the 
Middle and Southern States. In 1843, Willinnis & Co. sold their interest 
to Isaac Butts, who had been one of their traveling agents, who established 
himself in New York, and by extensive advertising more than doubled the 
sale of the Balsam. Mr. Butts appointed Smith & Fowle his general agents 
for New England, and a large demand was soon produced in that section. 
In 1844 Mr. Fowle purchased the interest of his partner in the drug business, 
and for eleven years carried it on in his own name. Although Mr. Butts 
was making money rapidly, his health became somewhat impaired, and, 
wishing to go West, he disposed of his entire interest in Wistar's Balsam 
to Mr. Fowle for thirty thousand dollars, and invested the gi-eater part of 
the amount in telegraph stock, which at that time was selling at very low 
prices. The stock, however, soon rose above par on his hands, and with the 
large dividends which were regularly paid he soon became a rich man. 
Mr. Butts made his home in Rochester, New York, and for several years 
edited and with others published the Daily U?iion, of that city, in Avhich he 
also made money, so that he was able to retire a few years since with about 
a million and a half. Rows of stores and acres of land owmed by him in 
Rochester attest the truth of what we write. 

Mr. Fowle now advertised Wistar's Balsam more extensively than ever, 
placing long advertisements in nearly every newspaper in the Eastern, 
Middle, and Southern States, and Canada, and as a consequence the sale of 
it became larger than that of any other medicine at that time in the market. 
It was with difficulty that the immense demand thus created was supplied, 
and at one time the Balsam was packed and shipped in barrels, the supply 
of boxes having failed. Mr. Fowle also increased his regular drug business 
and began to import largely, and soon became one of the leading merchants 
in his line in Boston. He devoted himself closely to business, and kept all 
the details of his extensive establishment under his immediate control. 

But, though doing a large and profitable business, misfortunes soon came 
upon him. Like many others who have made money rapidly, he soon began 
to lose it quite as fast. After several years of remarkable success, he met 
with serious reverses in California, through liis various investments and by 
endeavoring to assist others who had been less fortunate than himself. 
Having established a large sale for the Balsam, and knowing it to be an 
article of gi-eat real worth, he thought it would continue to sell upon its own 
merits, and consequently withdrew all his advertising. This, however, 
proved a great mistake, for it is a well-established tiict that, however useful 
or valuable a medicine may l)e, the sale of it can only be kept up by constant 
advertising. When Mr. Fowle withdrew his advertising the sale of the 
Balsam fell off, as new medicines were introduced, and they being extensively 
advertised the sale for these articles soon in a great measure supplanted that 
of Wistar's Balsam. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 145 

After several years of declining sales, Mr. Fowle recommenced adver- 
tising, but he found it no easy task to rebuild the business which had been 
so long allowed to run down. He, however, persisted, and the sales soon 
began to increase, and, though slowly at first, by means of constant adver- 
tising they have continued to augment ever since. Mr. Fowle, however, 
continued to make heavy losses, and in 1855 disposed of his drug business 
and devoted himself more closely to the Balsam. At this time he also 
obtained the sole agency for the Oxygenated Bitters, and took as a partner 
Mr. George W. Safford, who had long been his most valued and trusted 
assistant, continuing under the firm name of Seth W. Fowle & Co. Both 
medicines were then put out on consignment to four thousand agents, and, 
being extensively advertised, continued to have a very large and increasing 
sale. In 1858, Mr. Safford, having a good opportunity, disposed of his 
interest and began the manufacture and sale of toilet and fancy soaps, which 
business he still carries on under the name of the Boston Indexieal Soap 
Company. Mr. Fowle continued to advertise and sell Wistar's Balsam imtil 
his death, which occurred in October, 1867, though at the time of the 
breaking out of the rebellion, through repeated misfortunes, he lost all his 
property. His long-continued losses seemed to have completely broken him 
down and hastened his death, as during the last five years of his life he was 
no longer the smart, active, ambitious person that he had been before. He, 
however, left a spotless character. For years after he began to make heavy 
losses he struggled on in hopes of recovering the lost ground, when most 
men in similar circumstances would have given up in despair. He placed 
his honor and his character above everything else, his chief desire being to 
fulfil his promises to the letter. He was esteemed by all for his steadfast 
integrity and for his earnest endeavors to do what he thought right. One 
great cause of his success in business was the confidence felt by his customers 
in the quality and purity of every article kept in his store. No one can 
accuse him of adulterating his drugs or of using anything but the purest and 
best of materials in the various preparations compounded at his establish- 
ment. He was never known to misrepresent the quality of his wares unless 
he himself had been deceived, which was not often. He was a kind friend 
to young men starting in business, and many a successful merchant will 
always remember with gratitude the encouragement and pecuniary assistance 
he received from Mr. Fowle in his early career. It was through his willing- 
ness to assist others that some of his largest losses were made, though he 
has often remarked that he never lost a dollar through the assistance he 
rendered to young men who had been brought up in his store. 

In 1865 Mr. Fowle took into business his eldest son, Seth A. Fowle, 
who had been with him as clerk from 1856, and the style of the firm became 
Seth W. Fowle & Son. The business is still carried on by the younger Mr. 
Fowle, under the same name, and is constantly increasing, as the son, like 
his father, believes in the liberal use of printer's ink, and does not fail to 
apply it to his business. 



10 



WRITIN G ADYERTISEMEXTS. 



We have read somewhere the remark of a celebrated writer that 
" Liberal trade is good scholarship popularized, and commerce is literature 
on a signboard." By giving to the " sign-board " a liberal construction we 
arrive at the principle actuating men at the present day in all their trans- 
actions with one another, and by which fortunes are so often realized and 
enjoyed. To succeed, one must place himself before the public, make known 
his wares, and where he may be found, and this he must do through a sign- 
board. The sign-board, literally considered, is essential, and a matter of 
course, but there is still another, full as efficacious, and almost as generally 
adopted — the columns of the newspaper. This is the sign-board of which we 
would speak, recommend, and endeavor to persuade our readers to avail 
themselves of The advantages of such a system we have already pre- 
sented in previous articles, and do not propose to enlarge upon here, but 
to confine ourselves to narrower limits and discuss a subject of perhaps 
equal importance and closely connected therewith. However necessaiy it 
may be to advertise, and however impossible it may be to succeed without 
doing so, it is nevertheless an everyday fact that many lose the result of 
their efforts in this direction, Avholly or in part from the fatal error of paying 
so little attention to their manuscript compilations. A notice of any kind, 
to be read, must be readable ; to be readable, it must have been properly 
compiled, and to be properly compiled requires no little skill and labor. 
Many of our largest advertisers are beginning to understand this and govern 
themselves accordingly, and we hope soon to chronicle the time when the 
advertising columns of our newspapers shall l)e of far more interest than 
at present, if not the most so of any. Within the past i'ow years great 
improvements have been made in this direction, and we could easily fill a 
dozen pages with clippings from different i>ublications in all sections of the 
country, whose advertisements li;i\c ;i tiiily rliythmical and rhetorical ring, 
such as people like, and by wliicli they :no mostly influenced. It is an 
unmistakable fact that novelty attracts attention, and this is one great secret 
of the success of so many of our largest advertisers. Take, for instance, the 
notices of the celebrated l*lantation Bitters, now so universally published, 
and they alone substantiate our hypothesis. They are written Avith great 
care, and by a person who understands his b»isiness; tlie consequence is 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. I47 

they are generally read, produce a pleasing effect upon the reader, and, his 
own supposition to the contrary, he is influenced thereby, at any rate to such 
a degree that he Avould be more likely than ever before to purchase the 
article. In one of these, for example, we are told, 

" They made her a grave too cold and damp 
For a soul so honest and true." 

and then informed that " If they had been wise the dire necessity of opening 
the grave for one so lovely might have been averted, since 'Plantation 
Bitters,' if timely used, are sure to rescue the young and lovely, the middle- 
aged, and the ailing from confirmed sickness." The first two lines insure 
the reading of the whole article, and the following paragraph is more 
certainly remembered from its connection with what precedes. 

The same principle holds true in every case, whatever may be the 
subject. We have been not a little amused in perusing the real estate cards 
of the late George Robbins, as they formerly appeared in the English papers. 
He was justly celebrated for his compositions in this line, and had a most 
remarkable faculty for making the wilderness to smile, and the desert to 
abound in verdure and fertility. He once described the beauties and luxu- 
rious convenience of a " hanging wood " upon an estate offered for sale, 
which so worked upon the mind of a reader thereof that he bought the 
property without delay, and is said to have been somewhat disgusted when 
he found his " hanging wood," from the enjoyment of which so much was 
anticipated, to be nothing more nor less than a common gallows. In another 
case his description was so much beyond a perfect Eden that a fault or two 
was deemed necessary, consequently purchasers were informed that there 
were two drawbacks to the property, " the litter of the rose leaves and the 
noise of the nightingales ! " 

A true disciple of the doctrine laid down in the Tatler, that "the great 
skill in an advertiser is chiefly seen in the style which he makes use of He 
is to mention the ' universal esteem ' or ' general reputation ' of things that 
were never heard of," was one Packwood, a barber, who, by a strict ad- 
herence to this principle, impressed his razor-strop indelibly upon the mind 
of every bearded person within the royal domains. He even went so far as 
to boast of having in his employ a favorite of the muse, and once made 
answer to an inquiry concerning his advertisements, '-La, sir, we keeps a 
poet." It is doubtful if every firm can aflbrd such an extravagant luxury 
now-a-days, but we are often reminded by such notices as the following that 
his services are still in demand : 

"Heigh ho! To Boston we'll go, And buy all our teas of the East 
India Co. 

" Their prices are cheap. Their wares can't be beat, their praises are 
heard in every street. Then, heigh ho! to Boston we'll go, and buy our teas 
of the East India Co." 

The same paper from which we clip the above contains another, which, 
if not equally rhythmical, is certainly poetical in sentiment, and addressing 
Itself to what the Rev. Mr. Stiggins, with a groan and sip of hot pme-apple 



148 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

rum and water, would call the '' carnal" as well as the " spiritual," is certainly 
a specimen of a "peculiar style," and as such we publish it: 

ON CLEANSING OURSELVES. 

By the grace of God, let U3 cleanse ourselYes ; 

If we do not we shall go to hell, 

We would say we keep cleansing powders for humors, fevers, and oolds. 

And many other diseases, as of old. 

Now for the cleansing of the spirit ; 
It must be done by God's merit. 
Sinners, come to repentance, one and all. 
Unless you into hell would full. 

Reader, the de\-il will shut us out of heaven if he can, 
For that is his plan. 

By throwing out a bait of intemperance and jjride ; 
If we catch at them into destruction we shall slide. 

DR. GEORGE HOWE, 

Mechanic Street, , . 

The natural conclusion would be that allowing the premises to be 
correct, "cleansing" was on the whole decidedly necessary, but whether it 
be " the grace of God " or Dr. Howe's " cleansing powders" that will most 
effectually accomplish such a desirable end, or whether the two are supposed 
to work in harmony, we find ourselves unable to decide, and are consequently 
left in a terrible suspense, from which we hope to be relieved by a future 
publication. 

The afflicted widow, the disconsolate family, the lamented Mr. Edward 
Jones, and the beaver hat trade are somewhat " mixed " in the following 
extract from the columns of an English paper, and after vain endeavors on 
our part we must leave our readers to class it either as an " obituary," a 
''token of affection," or a " puff extraordinary." 

" Died on the 11th ultimo, at his shop in Fleet street, Mr. Edward Jones, 
much respected by all who knew and dealt with him. As a man, he was 
amiable, as a hatter he was upright and moderate. His virtues were beyond 
all price, and his beaver hats were only £1 4s. each. He has lei't a widow 
to deplore his loss, and a large stock to be sold cheap for the benefit of his 
family. He was snatched to the other world in the prime of his life, and 
just as he had concluded an extensive purchase of felt, which he got so cheap 
that the widow can supply hats at a more moderate charge than any other 
house in London. His disconsolate family will carry on the business with 
punctuality." 

We would not by any means be understood as recommending the 
extracts hereinbefore given as specimens for our leaders to follow. They 
are more especially intended as curiosities, and as indicative of the eccentri- 
cities to which the luiman mind is so often subject. The idea we would 
convey is simply that more attention should be paid by the advertiser to the 
j)reliminary stei)s, that success may more surely crown his efforts. 



¥EW YORK INDEPENDENT. 



Towards the close of the last century the New England churches sent 
out their missionaries into the new States. Men were sent, not only into 
New York, but into the West and the South. The Presbyterians were in 
the field, and a plan of union was formed between the Congregationalists 
and Presbyterians, by which the ministers of each should occupy the same 
field and the same churches. The Presbyterians were very tenacious ol 
their form of government, and this tenacity increased till it nearly swallowed 
up all there was of Congregationalism. About forty years ago the pressure 
made by the Presbyterians on the Congregationalists induced them to with- 
draw from the union and form small Congregational churches and associa- 
tions of the same form of government. The Old School Presbyterians cut 
oflT the New School and the Congregationalists from their presbyteries. 
This led to the formation of Congregational churches throughout the West. 
A company of young men went into Iowa, and were known as the Andover 
Band, from the theological seminary which they had left. They were able 
men, and through their labors new congregations were founded and new 
associations reared in most of the Western States. 

The Congregationalists had no organ out of New England. The 
Evangelist, till 1837, was a Congregational paper. It then became Pres- 
byterian. A new glory was dawning on the Congregational Church. Rev. 
Joseph P. Thompson and Dr. Cheever were in New York. Rev. R. S. 
Storrs and Henry Ward Beecher were in Brooklyn. They were men of 
talent and power. Their churches were large, wealthy, and influential. A 
newspaper through which these men could speak to the world seemed a 
necessity. Rev. Dr. Joshua Leavitt became the nucleus around which 
earnest and talented men gathered, who proposed to start a religious paper 
that should be second to none in the land. 

There were in New York several young Christian merchants of wealth, 
who proposed to found a paper upon a financial basis that should secure its 
publication for five years, whether the paper was a success or not, whether 
it had a subscriber or not. It was to be a catholic, liberal. Christian sheet, 
which should not only discuss religious topics, and be the organ of Congre- 
gationalism, but also be the champion of freedom, and a decided opponent 
of slavery. Three clerical gentlemen were selected as editors — Rev. Drs. 



150 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Bacou, of Xuw Haven, Thompson, of New York, and Storrs, of Brooklyn. 
After much discussion, the name Lidependent was adopted, as every way 
fitting to indicate the position the paper was to assume on matters religious, 
political, and educational. An agreement in writing was drawn, defining 
the duties of all parties connected with the paper — editors, proprietors, and 
assistants. 

The present editor-in-chief, Tlieodore Tilton, became connected with the 
Independent rather incidentally. He graduated from the Free Academy of 
New York, and connected himself with the Observer. He possessed a 
brilliant imagination, wrote acceptable poetry, was ready with his pen and 
tongue, and manifested a decided ambition to make his mark. A disagree- 
ment on the matter of slavery led to his dismissal from the Observer. He 
was afloat in the world, with a young wife on his hands, and without means 
of support. He was about twenty-one years of age, a member of Plymouth 
Church, and in his welfare the pastor and people took a decided interest. 
Through Mr. Beecher's influence, Mr. Tilton was put on the Independent in 
1856, to do anything that might be found for him to do. 

Unknown at the start, he first attracted general attention by a contro- 
versy in Plymouth Church between himself and Mr. Beecher. Mr. Tilton 
took the ground that as a consistent anti-slavery man Mr. Beecher could not 
support the American Board. Mr. Beecher defended his position, and Tilton 
assailed it, before crowded audiences, who were attracted by the discussion. 
Mr. Beecher was tender and conciliatory. Mr. Tilton was fierce, vindictive, 
and denunciatory. One of Mr. Tilton's speeches was i-eported and printed 
in the Independent. It put him to the front rank as an anti-slavery speaker, 
and he became a favorite orator at public meetings. It brought him out as 
a lecturer, and he is probably now as popular and successful as any man who 
makes lecturing a business. When Mr. Beecher went to Europe, Mr. Tilton 
was left in charge of the Independent. On the withdrawal of Mr. Beecher, 
without any formal introduction, he continued in the position which he now 
holds. He is sole editor of the paper. He is left perfectly free to conduct 
it as he will. While the drift is unchanged, he is untrammeled. Tlie 
leaders, double-leaded, are from his pen. 

Dr. Leavitt is associate editor. He Avas one of the original founders of 
the paper, and has held an important place in its management from the start. 
Trained a lawyer, he is a preacher of marked ability, a writer of pith, sharp- 
ness, culture. With extensive knowledge, he was able to assume any place, 
and fill any vacancy. Foi'ty years ago he came to the city, and was editor 
of the Sailor'' s Magazine. A decided Congregationalist, he edited the Evan- 
gelist when that paper \vas in the interest of that body. Under the control 
of Dr. Leavitt the IJiiam/elist took the side of refoini. (Ict'cuded Congrega- 
tionalism, assailing slavery, and vindicating revivals. In 184'2 he became 
editor of the Htnanrijxttor, whi(^h was removed to Boston. He closed his 
connection with that paper in 1S47, and was called into the original council, 
in 1848, by wliieh the Independent was started. Many years before, Dr. 
Leavitt commenced the system of re])orting sermons as they were delivered 
from the pulpit. The celebrated lectures of Mr. Finney, in Chatham Theatre, 
reported by Dr. Leavitt, attracted so much attention that professional 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTI^. 151 

reporters -\veie brought from Washington to do the same thing for other 
papers. 

Henry C. Bowen, who, twenty years ago, united with other yoimg 
merchants in establishing the Independent^ is now the sole pi'oprietor. His 
executive ability is very marked. He is liberal, generous, and considerate. 
The editors are untrammeled, their pay is large, and they are allowed to call 
in any aid needful to give the paper a position among the best in the land. 
Large sums are paid to writers — not any great sum to any individual, but a 
fair compensation to a large number. The proprietor intends to secure the 
best talent in the country, and pay that talent a handsome remuneration. 
Correspondence is not as much sought for, either foreign or at home, as 
formerly. Articles of merit, essays on important subjects and themes, take 
the place of gossiping letters. The new feature of the paper is the advocacy 
of female suifrage, to which it is as fully committed as to religion, anti- 
slavery, or temperance. Mr. Bowen is a genial, companionable, agreeable 
man, with great business talents. He has made the paper a paying success, 
It is, without doubt, the most profitable religious journal in the world. 

In cutting itself loose from Congregationalism, as a partisan organ, the 
Independent has changed none of its principles. It is still an unflinching 
advocate of freedom in church and state. It advocates the reforms and 
humanities of the age with surpassing ability. Its editor-in-chief, scarcely 
thirty-five years of age, is a very marked man in appearance. He is tall, 
with a decided stoop, a face in which the energy of youth and the maturity 
of age seem to struggle for the mastery. His hair, lightish brown, is long, 
flowing, and prematurely gray. He walks the streets with his head inclined, 
his eyes on the pavement, taking no notice of even his friends. He is genial, 
warm-hearted, and sociable, and has strong, warm friends, to whom he 
attaches himself as with hooks of steel. 

For twelve years the Indep)endent was conducted on a sectarian basis ; 
but it never was a financial success. The original owners fell ofi", one by 
one, till Mr. Bowen became principally responsible for the publication of 
the paper. It never paid its expenses. The editors were allowed to draw 
on him for any funds necessary to make the paper what it ought to be. He 
never questioned their expenditures, and paid all the bills cheerfully. While 
he was making money, a few thousands one way or the other amounted to 
but little. At the opening of the war the Independent was indebted to 
Mr. Bowen in the sum of forty thousand dollars. This, with the heavy 
losses resulting from the war, obliged the house of which he was a partner 
to suspend. During the long years of its existence the proprietors had 
received no income in any way from the paper. He entered the ofiice, 
rolled up his sleeves, and resolved to try the experiment whether or not the 
Independent could be made a paying paper. Twenty thousand dollars in 
cash have been paid for advertising since Mr. Bowen became the publisher. 
The indebtedness of forty thousand dollars has been paid from the profits. 
Two hundred thousand dollars was paid to extinguish the interest of parties 
in the paper. One half million of dollars has been refused for the paper. 
The salaries are liberal. The editor went on the paper at a salary of eight 
hundred dollars a year, and is now paid six hundred dollars a month, or, in 



153 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

round numbers, seven thousand five hundred dollars a year. Dr. Leavitt,- 
who started with the paper, has his salary increased with his infirmities, and 
will be supported when he is too enfeebled to labor. The ablest men of 
the difl^erent evangelical denominations are secured to swell the editorial 
force. The Independent is claimed to be the best paying paper in America, 
except the Herald. And this has been the fruit of cutting loose from party, 
local, and sectarian issues, and launching out on the broad ocean of Christian 
union, and giving its energies to the whole church. A splendid marble- 
building has been secured on Park Place, and is fitted up elegantly as a 
banking-house for the accommodation of the increasing business of this 
enterprising concern. 



L. S. Metcalf, one of the largest and best-established houses in the- 
stencil business in America, who has had large experience in advertisings 
speaks as follows : "My experience has left no doubt of the value of news- 
paper advertising, generally speaking. Of the manner of doing business 
practiced by Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co. I have the best possible opinion. 
Promptness, accuracy, and reasonable charges have characterized all their 
dealings with me." 



The easiest way in the world to throw away money is to advertise 
injudiciously. 

Tlie easiest way in the world to accumulate a fortune is to advertise- 
judiciously. 



Small advertisements, and plenty of them, is a good rule. We were- 
all babies once, yet we made considerable noise. 



HORACE WATERS. 



Among the best known men on Broadway is Horace Waters. He 
has so long sold music there to the world that his name sounds like that ot 
a familiar acquaintance, even when you do not know him. And on getting 
introduced you find that he has none of that stiffness and reserve which 
some business men put on as an armor to defend them from the attacks of 
the impertinent. He greets you with a friendly smile and a cordial grip of 
the hand, and his manners put you perfectly at your ease. He has had a 
more checkered life than many of our merchants, and the roses 'of expecta- 
tion have sometimes turned into thorns before he could grasp them. Yet 
he has kept on in a straightforward path, full of hope for the future and 
courage for the present. 

Mr. Waters came to this city about twenty years ago, as agent for a 
Boston firm of piano-makers. The instruments were good, and attracted 
much attention, and Mr. Waters was solicited to establish himself perma- 
nently here, which he did, and received a large measure of success. Large 
sales of pianos followed, and Mr. Waters finally went into the manufacture 
of the instruments himself Becoming embarrassed about fifteen years ago, 
he finally was compelled to make an assignment, and, we mention it with 
pleasure, Mr. Waters, on again reaching his feet, set aside a certain portion 
of his income to pay his old debts, and has now paid all or nearly all of 
them, living for this purpose with economy, and exercising sagacity in the 
management of the business. His pianos have a very large and extensive 
sale, and are well esteemed everywhere. Mr. Waters has been a most exten- 
sive advertiser, scattering his notices all through the land, and is probably 
the most widely known in this respect of any music man in the United 
States. A couple of years ago he disposed of his sheet music and small 
instrument business, and now attends exclusively to his pianos, having the 
large store at No. 481 Broadway fitted up for this purpose, where he keeps 
his instruments by the dozens, and where at any hour of the day ambitious 
musicians may be heard trying them. 



J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO. 



This great firm ranks at tlie head of the hook-jobljnig houses of the 
■\vorkl. 

Robert Chambers, of the well-known Edinburgh and London houses, is 
intimately acquainted with all the great firms in Great Britain and on the 
continent of Europe, and when he was in Philadelphia some eight or nine 
years ago he was filled with surprise when he saw the scale on wliich 
business was done by this house. His Avonder would increase did he now 
visit that city and look at the enlarged premises, the additional swarms of 
busy clerks, the piles of huge boxes awaiting transport to the diiferent 
railroads, and all the signs that he might witness of the increasing activity 
and prosperity of this old establishment. 

It may be considered old, at least, in this country ; for the house dates 
from the last century, and its history has been one of growth all the time, 
even in the midst of great political and national changes, showing the Avisdom 
with which its affairs have been managed. Like many of our great commer- 
cial houses, its business with the Southern and Western States had grown 
apace, and when the war broke out the indebtedness of Southern merchants 
to this firm was so great that no business could have borne such a strain as 
was made by the suspension of payments from this cause on this house, had 
not the capital in hand been almost unlimited. And yet the trade of the 
firm went on as before, even growing iinder the difficulty; and, while strong 
houses and admirable men bent and fell before the storm, this house rose 
higher and higher and ])ecame stronger as war raged on. 

Some houses are confined to the business of publishing alone, others are 
bookselling establishments, and others again are devoted to stationery. The 
house of J. B. Lippincott & Co. includes all these departments, and then 
again everything will be found in it, in each of these departments, of the 
most varied character, in coimection with erudition or business, that even 
fancy could suggest. Almost all houses that rise get hold of an idea, and 
they use it vigorously. Thus has it been with Bonner and his New York 
Z/edf/er, and so also has it been with this firm. Long since llie managers 
bethought themselves of the waste of time and the trouble that Southern 
and Western purchasers had to incur, by going from one publishing house 
to another, from street to street in that city, from there to \ew York, and 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 155 

thence to range about through the publishing houses in Boston. The remedy, 
and the profitable one, too, was obvious. A qiiick intelligence soon ascer- 
tained what new books were taking in the market, by whomsoever they 
were published; and accordingly every book in plentiful abundance that 
would sell was soon found on the shelves of this wise and wealthy firm. 
Hence it soon became known that the dealer from Lexington, from Pitts- 
burgh, from Mobile or Savannah, had no occasion to waste his time in toilino- 
about from city to city, and from house to house. Here in one place were 
all the " selling books," and he had only to make his selection, and give his 
order at his ease. Did his stock run out, he knew where to send for more, 
and thus this firm speedily became one of the largest, and it is now beyond 
doubt by far the most extensive jobbing house in the world. 

Advertising has always been largely practiced by the Lippincotts. 
When a new book is out, they have not hesitated to advertise it freely, and 
have found their reward in so doing. This has been the uniform practice of 
the firm for a quarter of a century, and among the books advertised by them 
have been some of the best in America. A uniform result has followed their 
expenditure of capital thus far ; it has been very productive. 

Eighteen or twenty years ago it was a subject of wonder to see the 
piles of vast boxes of books on the sidewalks that this house was despatch- 
ing, while other establishments were comparatively idle. So far back as 
1834, the freight shipments reached the number of one thousand nine himdred 
and sixty-eight large boxes, while in 1868 they amounted to nineteen thou- 
sand two hundred and sixty-one boxes, an increase of eight himdred and 
seventy-six over the previous year, and 1869 records an advance far beyond 
the former experience of other years. That there is no exaggeration in this 
description will be evident by the fact that these large shipments reach over 
twenty States of the Union every day. 

Of course these enormous sales include all that is disposed of in the 
publishing department, the ordinary bookselling, home and foreign, as well 
as stationery. In the matter of publishing this^ firm has issued nearly two 
hundred new volumes during the year, while the business of the greatest 
works goes steadily on. Of these larger works there can be formed some 
idea if Chambers' Encyclopaedia, in ten royal octavo volumes, with atlas, be 
mentioned, the production of which involved an outlay of over one hundred 
thousand dollars. Lippincott's Pronouncing Gazetteer alone cost over fifty 
thousand dollars, while Prescott's works are in fifteen volumes, octavo ; and 
besides these arelrving's works, several editions of the Waverley novels, two 
of Bulwer, forty-four and twenty-two volumes each; Thackeray's works, 
twenty-two volumes, together with Imperial Bibles, Bagster's Bibles, and 
Bibles of the most gorgeous size and beauty of type and paper for the 
pulpit. 

A new work now on hand, on Universal Biography, by Dr. J. I. Thomas, 
will absorb at least fifty thousand dollars, and the two concluding volumes 
of Allibone's Dictionary of Authors will require some twenty thousand 
dollars to bring them out. Indeed a walk through the cellars of this house 
among the stereotype plates is one of the most interesting exhibitions in 
connection with modern literature. 



156 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

The work of the firm is divided between two places. The establish- 
ment for production, including printing, binding, and other processes of 
preparation is in North Fifth street, and it alone is a first-class commercial 
emporium, almost as large as the more prominent house, Nos. 715 and 717 
Market street, five stories above ground and two underneath, where packing 
and other work can be done for ac. patch of business. 

Interesting as it is to walk over large farms in our great West and to 
examine our huge clothing stores, our rolling mills, and mammoth grain 
elevators in our extending cities, it is more pleasing still to wander over 
these gigantic places devoted to literature, because they afford such decided 
evidence that, rapid as our growth is in all that is material, we are advancing 
more rapidly in mental culture and and in all that tends to adorn society, to 
civilize and to render life delightful. 



'• We don't employ an advertising agency,'' say some. Does it pay for 
them to say so ? Let us see. The merchant does not pay out money him- 
self; he does it by a check on a bank. Why ? Because the bank has the 
machinery for receiving and collecting money better than an individual, and 
the latter has less trouble. An advertising agency has this same advantage. 
You are sure of the execution of all contracts which you give through them. 
" I can make better bargains myself" Try it, make your best contract, and 
Geo. P. Rowell & Co. will give you a discount on even that. " I know 
better in what to put my notices." Do you ? How much time a day do 
you devote to advertising? An hour, perhaps. In this time you can 
become acquainted with six thousand periodicals and newspapers, possibly. 
Editors continually write letters to you giving tlieir circulation and that of 
their cotemporaries ; you hold levees all day with them, and you employ 
thirty or more assistants to help you. At least you should do this, if you 
expect to cope with an agency. All this knowledge and information is 
rendered available like an index in a book to the agent; where is your 
corresponding knowledge ? Do you think that, unassisted, you can in an 
hour a day know as much as all these glean in a business in which their life- 
has been passed ? 



Don't take down your sign in dull times. People read newspapers all 
times of the year. 



ORANGE JUDD. 



We are indebted to the kindness of a friend for the use of a copy of 
^'Travels of a Woman in America," by Olympe Amedee, an interesting 
book descriptive of American manners and customs, lately published in 
Paris by a lady. We had intended to insert a sketch from our own pen, in 
which Mr. Judd would have kindly assisted us, but have found the follow- 
ing so well written that we have no desire to improve it. It will be 
observed that her judgments on American life are somewhat inaccurate, but 
we have thought better to print them thus than to attempt to correct them : 

As we journey through the western part of the State of New York we 
are surprised at the rapid progress of the agricultural art, which has in a 
few years changed the wooded fields to smiling farms and handsome villages. 
The beautiful lakes of Seneca and Cayuga wash with their waters lands 
which remind me of my own home, and the repose and quiet of these places 
have in them something of the primeval, when the red man wandered through 
the glades and slaked his thirst in the cool brooks. Grapes, which the foggy 
air of England seems to destroy, are found here in abundance, especially in 
the neighborhood of Ithaca, where a new University has been founded, 
which, although it may probably never equal those of Paris, Gottingen, or 
Berlin, is yet an institution destined to afford much instruction to the people 
of America. There are professorships similar to those in the agricultural 
schools of our own land, whose object is to teach the elements of the art of 
tilling the soil. Besides this, there are several journals published in the 
mterest of farmers in the vicinity, at Rochester, one of which has recently, 
however, been removed to New York. I was indebted to the editor of this, 
who had once been the Mayor of his city, for several attentions and kind- 
nesses, and he also cordially invited me to visit him in New York. 

This periodical has a rival in that city, known as the American Agrictil- 
turist, situate on that overpraised street which is the principal thoroughfiire, 
called Broadway. Long as this street is, and decorated with so many fine 
buildings, it is yet disgraced by much which cannot be excelled in Naples itself 
during the wet season. Just opposite the Hotel de Ville there is to be seen 
a five-story building occupied by the proprietors of this great newspaper for 
the use of their business and the sale of books on agriculture. Having had 
my attention attracted by the enormous signs upon the edifice, I lelt some 



158 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

curiosity to see what manner of man tliis init::lit l)e wlio had from poverty 
conquered prosperity, even as Fabius turned discouraging reverses into bright 
successes. Accompanied by a young lady of the city, to Avhom I had been 
introduced by the kindness of a common friend, I sallied forth one morning 
down the great avenue. Mj companion was unmarried, but possessed of a 
coolness and dignity of manner that I saw Avould render her material service 
under circumstances such as might easily happen in this metropolis of the 
new world. The American girls have a liberty given them Avhich is very 
surprising to us French, educated under a different system, but they rarely 
degenerate into immodesty. My companion was pretty and vivacious, 
spoke French neatly, and wrote social essays for the newspapers and 
sketches for the magazines. 

Arrived at the door, my friend inquired for M. Judd, the principal pro- 
prietor, who presently came forward through the magasin to greet us. 
After introduction, during which he shook my hand quite warmly, as is the 
habit with these Americans at every occasion, he entered into conversation 
with my friend, and I had an opportunity to notice this truly great man, 
who is adding so much to the knowledge and virtue of the country by his 
admirable teachings. Mr. Judd is somewhere near fifty years of age, 
decidedly laid, in figure tall and somewhat stooping, and bears in his coun- 
tenance the mark of early toil and industry. After casting this rapid glance 
at his exterior, I attempted to enter into conversation with him, but found 
it impossible, for, like the other great Americans, he does not speak our lan- 
guage. It is not necessary for great Americans to know it, as some poor 
devil of a foreigner can always be found who will do the labor of ti-ans- 
ferring from one language to another. I consequently was obliged to do all 
my talking through Miss G., who handled her own and our language in a 
very deft way. This worthy man is one of those whom his countrymen 
delight to call self-made, and his early aspirations, like those ot Arago or 
Newton, were for philosophical investigations. Unfortunately, the results of 
these patient inquiries into the truths of nature have not been preserved, 
and we are thereby deprived of much which we might otherwise have 
known. As Napoleon fought his way up from the humble position of a 
sub-lieutenant, so has the worthy M. Jiuld risen from his home in a plain 
cabin near the Niagara River, througli one of those little gymnasia Avhieli are 
grotescjuely termed colleges in America, to great eminence, and like our 
own Emperor he has endured great privations in his early life. One oi" his 
biographers (for in America every great man numbers them by the dozen) 
says that he supported himself once by digging in a garden at eight cents an 
hour, which shows the high pitch to which prices for agricultural labor have 
come in the United States. 

His great work, thougli, was remodeling the ncM'spaper which so ably 
instructs the people of the United States on the matters of the farm. A 
hundred able men write for it, although the more immediate members of the 
staff number only about six or eight. Each of these lias his de]iartment, 
and the whole vast business is presided over by tlic juastcr mind of ]\I. 
Judd, who keeps an active eye on everything. At tiic rear of his magasin 
there is an immense room where are stored the articles intemled lor <rifts to 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 159' 

the subscriber, as even with this excellent paper it is necessary to bribe 
people to take it. Such is the general practice in America, I believe, and it 
is as requisite for them to do so as it is for us to coax children vi^ith bonbons. 
In this r«ar room there are to be found gold watches ; the great dictionaries 
of Webster and Worcester, whose productions almost rival that of M. 
Littre ; sewing-machines, which every needlewoman in America thinks she 
must have; pianos; clothes-wringers, table furniture, and other things in 
great variety, and on his farm in Flushing it is said he keeps bulls and sheep 
of improved breed, although it can hardly be conceived how this can be the 
case, as the place has less than one hectare of surlace. Still, they do these 
things wonderfully in America. All this immense assemblage of trinkets 
and gifts is kept up by this journal as rewards to its subscribers, or as 
bonuses for obtaining others. The American is always industrious, but he 
is never more happy than when connected with a newspaper. Even if he 
receive no more than a pot of jam, he is invariably pleased, and if he should 
obtain a pump and sprinkler, although his house was amply supplied Avith 
water from the city works, he is overjoyed. M. Judd contributes to this 
innocent amusement, and is deserving no doubt of high praise. 

A marked feature which characterizes the gazette of M. Judd is its 
denunciation of fraudulent attempts to procure money, known in that 
country as swindles (the word being derived from the German). It is under- 
stood that when this worthy gentleman came to town, like d'Artagnan to 
Paris, he was deluded and preyed upon by several of these chevaliers 
d'industrie. Naturally this worked a change of feeling in his mind, and he 
has since devoted regularly a portion of his columns to the purpose of 
exposing the designs of these rogues. This is very praiseworthy, and does 
honor to him. Many would have been glad to conceal the facts within their 
own bosom, but M. Judd has nothing of this ignoble pride. To render the 
world a service he heroically strikes at all roguery and injustice everywhere. 

Around the rooms we noticed many long-haired Puritans of the Crom- 
welliau type, at least in appearance, diligently reading the various books to 
be found there. His partners also in the conduct of business were intro- 
duced to us, and seemed likewise to be of a very high stamp of intelligence. 
They attend chiefly to the business, at which a fortune is made every year, 
and are thought to be very keen. The trio together have all the virtues, 
and are like that celebrated coalition of the statesmen of England who 
together possessed all the talents, although no one united them. 

This distinguished farmer, M. Judd, is a member of the Methodist 
Church, a schismatic organization which has obtained great headway in both 
England and America, and has recently given fifty thousand dollars to one of 
those New England universities which possess as many professors on all 
topics as in an European one discuss the classics. It is no doubt a worthy 
institution, and will reap large advantages from his services. The gift has 
acted as a very handsome way of drawing attention to his journal, to which 
he is by no means averse, as he has frequently aimed to do so by other means. 
The attention of Americans to the amionces is indeed wonderful; no one 
neglects it, and no one does not advertise. 



JOHN W. PITTOCK. 



Alexander Hamilton commenced his career as a leader of men when 
only seventeen years of age, and Pitt, the great Commoner, was Prime Min- 
ister when only a little over the period of his majority. So Fortime 
disposes her gifts, and does not allow graybeards to take all the honors. 
John W. Pittock, the editor of the Simday Leader in Pittsburgh, is a 
notable instance of success in youth, and of industry attaining its sure 
rewards. He is the youngest of those we chronicle in these pages, having 
been born in March, 1844, and is consequently twenty-six years of age. His 
parents were in moderate circumstances, but he early became bitten with the 
business mania — with the desire to do something of importance in the world. 
It is true his first venture was in a very small way, but it gave him a quick- 
ness of apprehension and a knowledge of the world which delicately bred 
young fellows know nothing of In 1854 or 1855, being then only ten or 
eleven years of age, he began selling newspapers in the streets of the 
Smoky City. He was successful at this, and naturally desired to add 
to his profits, which he did by opening a small store in 1856, where, in addi- 
tion to newspapers, he sold stationery, badges, flags, and so on. This was 
during the inspiriting Fremont campaign, M'hen the air was surcharged with 
political electricity. Party spirit ran high, and the friends of Buchanan and 
Fremont rushed in and out after the tokens of their respective faiths, to 
flaunt them in the streets. Plenty of money flowed into his till, but with the 
usual unwisdom of youth he deposited his money in the hands of a banker 
who failed. This stopped the store, and Pittock began again to sell newspa- 
pers in the streets. Bonner had just then commenced that system of adver- 
tising which will render him more famous than all the fast horses or wealth 
which he possesses, and the Gunmaker of Moscow was the reigning sensation 
of the day. America wept and laughed over this as it has never done over 
Dickens or George Eliot, and newsboys reaped golden harvests by selling it. 
With the Ledger, he began delivering the New York dailies, which even 
then had a very considerable circulation in Pittsburgli. In the management 
of this he instituted a new system. He did not wait for customers to come 
to him as \\'i lazily sauntered through the streets, but entered the offices and 
sold the Tribune or Herald, as the case might be. Every merchant and 
lawyer knew liim, and this ac.cniaiiitance was ol' great value to him in his 
future life. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 



161 



er. 



About this time, too, he entered the newspaper field as a publisher. 
The theatre occupied his attention, and the journal was called the World. 
This was not very long lived, and a newspaper and periodical store was 
opened again. It was on the wholesale plan, and his credits proved to have 
been extended to many persons who never should have had them, and he 
Jailed again. He was then in debt two thousand dollars. For these sums he 
gave notes, and spent his earnings in the future in paying them off. After 
this misfortune the New York dailies rose into their former importance with 
him, and he again sold them in the street. Owing to the solicitations of 
■ some friends he opened a store in Wheeling, but did not attend to it himself, 
and as a consequence soon withdrew. 

All this that we have narrated happened before he was twenty years of 
age, and his misfortunes were largely owing to the inexperience of youth. 
Trained, however, in the school of hard knocks, he now had learned the 
theory of success, and from that time on has had it. In 1864 he took a store 
agam in the be.st location of the city, although the room was very small, and 
sold at retad the various periodicals of the day and the ordinary books that 
had their brief sensation of an hour. As the current of trade became 
Jarger, he gradually increased his accommodations until the space which he 
now requires was all taken— a large three-story building, situated on the 
.corner of Smithfield street and Fifth avenue. At this time he began adver- 
tismg, which he has ever since used with eminent effect. A large portion of 
his subsequent success he attributes to the agency of advertisements. 

In December, 1864, when the war was at its hight, when paper was at 
an almost fabulous price, and when all the expenses that could attend a 
newspaper were at their greatest, Mr. Pittock established the Sunday 
Leader. It was a bold venture, and although carefully conducted gave no 
pecuniary return, but on the contrary the proprietor lost steadily for three 
years. Eight thousand dollars had been sunk when the tide began to turn 
and money to pour in. After paying out this, three thousand dollars more 
was expended, largely in advertising, and with the most beneficial results. 
The letter hst was transferred to him, and advertisers followed the guidance 
of the Postoflice Department. The first numbers had been published under 
many discouraging circumstances; the work was done in a job office, and 
the presswork was given out. But as Mr. Pittock became more prosperous 
type was bought and a press was procured, and all the labor was done on his 
•own premises, thus lessening the expense materially. Telegraphic news was 
used freely, advertising aided to float the craft, and the Sunday Leader now 
■pays a magnificent profit. 

A striking feature in the career of this enterprising publisher and book- 
seller is his annual dinner to the newsboys. Beginning when his means 
were small, he has annually repeated his first experiment, and many a news- 
boy will in future bless John W. Pittock for the aid and encouragement he 
has received from him. Every one who is acquainted with him knows that 
his benefactions spring from his natural wish to do good, and not from a 
deeire to obtain the applause of the world. Long may he continue, as now 
;to publish the Leader and to aid actively in the good works of humanity. 



ADVANTAGES OF AN ADVERTISING AGENCY. 



Comt'ovt, happiiies-s, and prosperity, terms reseiuldiiig each (Ulier ii» 
many respects so much as almost to be, synonymous, are what we all desire, 
and any means that will tend to the gratification of this desire is anxiously 
sought for and eagerly employed. Industry is at the foundation of all 
things, yet to be beneficial it must be productive ; this product ofiers the 
means of satisfying the desires, and when increased the satisfaction is ec^ually 
heightened. Suppose a man by the same amount of labor to do tw ee the 
business this year he did last. He will in consequence satisfy the desiie that 
business gratifies twice as abundantly; not only this, he will have more to 
exchange with others, and thereby they will be able to gratify their desires 
more abundantly. He, therefore, not only adds to his own happiness, but 
contributes to that of his neighbor. From this reasoning we arrive at the 
conclusion that it is a benefit to a whole neighborhood for a single member 
of it to become rich. This being so, the next inquiry is as to how the 
desired end can best be reached. The influence of the press in increasing 
the demand for the product by bringing it before the consumers in the most 
favorable light is admitted daily by the practical example of the producers. 
Industry has no more valuable medium for both parties, nor can she ever 
adopt a better, and it is growing in importance constantly. Yet in employ- 
ing this medium, as in all things, there is a best method, the use of which 
must necessarily be for the benefit of all i>arties interested, and it is of this 
we propose now to speak. 

We have already shown that the productiveness of human industry may 
be greatly increased by the discovery of new qualities, and in their practical 
ai)plication, but this is not all. The result of human eftbrt may be still 
further greatly augmented, by the application of the laws of politit^al 
economy in the division of labor. Time is recognized by every civilized 
nation, and it is only the savage who combines in his own person all the 
departments of industry, while in the most advanced j)eriods of civilization 
we find division of labor carried to its ultimate limits. This division, so far 
as the newspaper and the advertiser are concerned, is attained in its most 
advanced state in the advertising agent. 

The employmcnl of an agent saves time and expense to the advertiser. 
The supposition is a correct one that a man's time is of most value in his 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 103 

own business, and whatever tends to withdraw that time and employ it 
upon other matters is not only so much loss to the man, but also lessens to 
that amount industrial productions generally. Hence a universal injury arises 
therefrom, and all in a degree suffer. An advertiser to contract personally 
with a hundred newspapers must write at least two hundred letters ; to do 
the same through an agent would require at the outside but two. Supposing 
it to require but fifteen minutes to write each of these letters and read the 
answers, this would consume fifty hours, or allowing ten hours a day, five 
working days, while through an agent this could all be accomplished in 
thirty minutes — a saving of forty-nine and one-half hours, or more than four 
and one-half days. The time thus economized will go towards increasing 
the general revenue, and there will be so much to add to the gross amount, 
while the expense is lessened in a relative proportion. Reckoning the time 
at five dollars per day only, together with postage and paper, there is a net 
saving here alone of nearly thirty dollars. 

The same result can be accomplished much quicker and better through 
an agent. It is his business. He knows just what to do and how to do it 
better than any one else ; he has a system and a method of reaching the 
paper which no advertiser can expect. All care to the patron is removed. 
He but sends in a single order which meets with immediate execution, and 
in due time, without further trouble, his name is read by thousands, his 
business note<1 by all interested, a copy of each paper is forwarded to him, 
and an immediate demand from new customers more than satisfies his most 
sanguine expectations. The effect of habit is know^n to every one. It renders 
any operation, frequently repeated, easy. The mind becomes adapted to 
that particular form, and can best pursue it, for by constantly engaging in 
the same occupation a degree of skill and dexterity is acquired which greatly 
increases production. Hence the advantages enjoyed by the agent alone, 
in this respect. It being his business, he devotes himself to it, and is con- 
stantly adopting new plans for the more successful prosecution of the work. 
The more completely any process is analyzed the simpler must become the 
individual operations of which it is composed. Adam Smith informs us that 
in the first steam-engines boys were constantly employed to open a com- 
munication between the boiler and cylinder, according as the piston ascended 
or descended. One of these boys observed that by uniting the handle of 
the valve wdiich opened this communication wdth another part of the 
machine, the valve would open and shut without his assistance, and leave 
him at liberty to play with his fellows. One of the most important improve- 
ments of this machine was thus, by division of labor, brought within the 
capacity of a playful boy. 

It is not his time and the extra expense alone, then, that is saved to the 
advertiser by the method before enumerated, for his work is done bettei-, 
more expeditiously and in a more satisfactory manner than he could possibly 
have done it himself The labor is divided and all are benefited. 

To the patron, therefore, there are many reasons for adopting our 
system. He saves time, which is more valuable than money, as well as 
money itself ; he deals with one party instead of many; he is subject to no 
trouble or annoyance, for his orders meet with prompt attention, and an 



164 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

immediate fulfilment thereof follows in every case, while the papers can at 
any time be examined and a copy of each be sent him. The rates are as 
low, and in some cases lower than he could contract for personally with the 
publishers, and the work being all arranged beforehand cannot fail ot 
meeting with approbation. 

To the newspaper also the advantages of dealing with an agent are 
apparent. It contracts with one instead of many. One account only need 
be opened for a vast number of advertisers. The publisher looks to the 
agent alone, and being assured of his responsibility feels perfectly safe. Thus 
correspondence, time, money and trouble are all saved by this admirable 
arrangement. It carries the division of labor to perfection, and establishes 
the entire system upon a firm basis, and if upon this basis producers were 
to form their plans and establish their business, they M^ould in truth join 
in promoting each other's welfare, and might well rejoice in each other's 
prosperity. 



It is a fact that all those persons doing a business which requires exten- 
sive advertising, and who from the mode of conducting it are enabled to 
arrive at a close approximation of the results ])roduced by each separate 
investment in this way, are universal in the opinion that better contracts can 
be secured through a well-established advertising agency like that of Geo. 
P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, New York, than can be obtained from pub- 
lishers direct, no matter how familiar with rates and papers the advertiser 
may be. It stands to reason that an agency controlling patronage to the 
extent of from fifty to one hundred thousand dollars per month should be 
able to secure favors which would not be accorded to any mere individual, 
even if we omit entirely the benefits which they must derive from their 
extensive experience. 



If business admits of it. scver.il small advertisements, with vour name 
repeated, every tinu% will avail more than tlie same collected, with your 
name in only once. 



MADAME DEMOREST. 



This well-known and distinguished lady was born at Saratoga Springs, 
New York, in 1825. She was the second child and oldest daughter of a 
family of eight brothers and sisters, and early gave promise of that taste and 
aptness which afterwards rendered her so renowned. Her parents were 
intelligent, well-to-do people, and she received the advantages of a good 
education. 

The mind and body of the young artiste, however, were too active to 
permit her to be satisfied with the limited opportunities and dull routine 
which village life afforded her. Physically, she was blessed with a splendid 
constitution and a fine personal appearance. It was often said of her that 
her eyes alone were sufficient to constitute a handsome woman. She exer- 
cised her embryotic talents in criticising and improving upon the efibrts 9f 
village milliners and dressmakers, became the oracle of her circle in all mat- 
ters relating to dress and style, but secretly chafed at the seclusion and 
obscurity in which her lot was cast, and pined for the larger life and the 
greater opportunities which cities afforded. 

When she was eighteen years old her parents reluctantly yielded to her 
often repeated desire to begin life for herself; but rather than have her leave 
home gave her a few hundred dollars with which to commence business, at 
the same time securing the services of a professional lady from a neighbor- 
ing city to superintend the small establishment, and instruct Miss E. Louise 
Curtis (Mme. Demorest's maiden name) in those technical details of her 
art which she had not yet mastered. In one year Miss Curtis thought she 
had learned all of the business that village opportunities afforded, and she 
received the offer of an engagement in Troy, which she gladly accepted, 
eager to acquire experience on a larger scale. 

From that time she never returned to her home to live. She made 
frequent visits of a few weeks' duration, always crowned with new honors, 
and also with increased responsibilities ; but the old home, the village street, 
the tea party, the sewing circle, knew the light-hearted, ambitious yoimg 
gh'l no more. 

The next engagement she made was as the superintendent of a depart- 
ment in a large establishment, and from that time she never took a step 



166 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

back, never held any subordinate position, but always had entire charge of 
either a business or a department. The circumstances of her life were 
evidently shaping themselves to enable her to complete the destiny which 
awaited her. 

Her iirst visit to New York was made in company with the Troy lady 
whose assistant she had fir.st become, and after a brief sojourn at the West, 
and passing through various vicissitudes, she finally returned to New York 
city, where she became acquainted with Mr. Demorest, a circumstance that 
was to exercise so important an influence on her whole future life. 

Their marriage took place after an acquaintance Avhich revealed to each 
other the high qualities of both parties. Mr. Demorest was singularly 
appreciative of all that strength and energy of character in his wife which 
many men are afraid of and try so hard to repress. He aided her to the 
utmost by his business skill, tact, and enterprise, to carry out the plan of a 
great American Fashion Emporium which should popularize the best styles 
and carry them to the remotest sections of the country. Of course this 
required the employment of a large amount of capital, as well as ceaseless 
efl:ort and perseverance. 

Mme. Demorest was fully aware of the groat advantage of thorough 
and wide-spread advertising at a time when its influence was not at all 
recognized as it is to-day, when so many have reaped abundant profit from 
it. Her natural shrewdness and clear judgment enabled her to see that an 
impression once produced is never eradicated, and that the reputation of a 
representative house could be established only by being widely known. 

In conjunction with her husband she opened, in connection with the 
New York house, a system of branches cap.able of unlimited extension, and 
ip a very few years had increased it from its small and feeble beginning 
until they had penetrated almost every city, town, village. State, and ter- 
ritory in the country, and many of the important cities in the British 
possessions. 

The immediate cause of this ra])id and long-continued popularity was 
the fact that this system not only established direct connection with a known 
metropolitan house, and therefore served as a guarantee of superiority in 
taste and correctness of style, but supplied from the fountain head a most 
welcome addition to the income of dressmakers throughout the country, 
who, previous to that time, and when sewing-machines were hardly tl. ought 
of, had only the very limited returns of the work of their own hands to 
depend upon. 

This system created a revolution in the old-fashioned method of 
dressing children. Mme. Demorest made fashions for children a .yirrialite, 
and supplied designs for the entire wardrobe of girls, boys, and infants, for 
the first time in this, or probably any other country ; thus improving the 
methods and greatly facilitating the labors of mothers and seamstresses. 
She has also obtained several patents which have proved very useful and 
valuabh;, and these more fully attest her inventive genius. 

In lur writings, Mme. Demorest is always eminently ])ra('tical. She 
uses no profuse words; her fine perceptions and large personal experience 
give to her arguments a point and pungency that carries conviction. This 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTI^^E. 167 

was illustrated in the results of a series of articles which she furnished to 
the press a few years since, on the question of woman's wages and labor, 
which occupied so much attention She gave a very sensible and practical 
solution of the whole problem, which settled the controversy. 

In 1860 Mrae. Demorest issued the first number of the Quarterly 
Mirror of Fashions^ a journal which in an incredibly short time achieved 
a circulation of sixty thousand copies. Its great popularity, and the fact 
that Mr. Demorest had, in the interim, become editor and proprietor of the 
New York Illustrated Neios, induced them after four years of uninterrupted 
success, to consolidate the two publications into Demorest'' s Ilhistrated 
Monthly and Mme. Demorest's Mirror of Fashio7is. The new publication 
at once took the lead as the best parlor magazine of the day, a position 
which it has steadily maintained. 

Mme. Demorest is emphatically a woman of business, yet she is not a 
mei-e business woman. She has always been foremost in all the progressive 
movements of the day, and endorses heartily and warmly whatever tends 
to the elevation and improvement of her sex. She has several children, all 
handsome and promising, and is not only the head of a great establishment, 
but the inspiration of her home, and the centre of a large circle of warm 
personal friends. 



Why do you advertise ? Is it to give a gratuity to the printer ? If so, 
you had better give it to him at once, and you will thereby probably reap 
as much advantage to yourself Be assured that no man ever advertised 
largely without being convinced that it was for his good, and if you adver- 
tise without faith you will never reap anything from it, because, as in all 
gifts, you simply bestow that which you can afford to lose — a small sum. 
Small sutas in advertising bring nothing like the productive answers that 
larger ones do, as they fail to make an impression. A single man shouting 
at you as you are going into town on a stage-coach will be forgotten in a 
week ; not so if a hundred raise up their voices. You do not remember the 
railroad disaster that occurred a year ago by which one man was killed, but 
you can never forget the accident at Avondale, in which, by the burning of the 
woodwork around the mouth of the mine, hundreds w^ere destroyed. The 
impression was then intense on your mind; you will only forget it when 
life ceases. So with advertising. A notice which is not pungent enough ot 
itself to be recollected must be continually repeated, but every effort should 
be made to have it remembered. Make your notices apt, beautiful, cogent, 
determined, earnest, frank, good, hearty, insisting, jovial, knowing, laconic, 
musical, neat, original, pat, quippish, regular, sarcastic, truculent, unique, 
various, witty, yowling, and zealous, and you will undoubtedly attract 
.custom. 



HARPER & BROTHERS. 



The firm of Harper & Brothers has been, for over half a century, one of 
the most eminent of American book-publishing houses. Its catalogue is the 
fullest and completest, and the intrinsic merit of the books published by it 
has been so high that it could dispose of a greater number of volumes, with 
less trouble, than any other house in America. The firm has been, until- 
recently, composed of four brothers, all alike bred to the business, and all 
starting with no other advantages than that of a common school education,- 
sound moral principles, and indomitable industry. James Harper was the 
oldest brother, and was born in the town of Newtown, Long Island, on the 
13th of April, 1795. The town is now one of the populous suburbs of the 
city, but at that time it was still a secluded country village; and James, with 
his younger brothers, remained quietly at home, going to the district school 
and working upon his father's farm. The influence of his home confirmed 
his naturally sturdy and honest character ; and at the age of sixteen he and 
his brother John were apprenticed to diflerent printers in New York — twc 
boys beginning active life with no capital but sound principle and honest 
purpose. James was a lad of great personal strength, which was confirmed 
by his regular and correct habits. Thurlow Weed was a fellow-workman,- 
and frequently worked at the same press with him, changing hour and hour. 
The friendship then begun lasted through life, and a full-length photograph 
of his old companion in trade hung over the mantle in the dining-room of 
Mr. Harper's house when he left it for the last time. James was soon the 
most noted pressman in the city, and it is a tradition that if he disliked a 
fellow-pressman, and wished to be rid of him, lie outworked liim, and so 
compelled him to retire. 

The habits of hi.s rural home followed him to the city. In an age when 
everybody drank ardent spirits freely he was strictly temperate, and the cold- 
water disciple justified his faith by his works. With the cheerful constancy 
of the fathers of his church, he quietly resisted the temptations of the city,, 
and opened a prayer-meeting in the house of an old colored woman in Aim 
street, and joined the John Street Methodist Church. Meanwhile to their 
simple and thrifty method of life James and his brother added work out of 
hours, so that when their apprenticeship was ended they had a little money 
saved. Their capital now was sound principle, honest purpose, a trade of 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 169 

which they were masters, and some hundreds of dollars, increased from their 
father's means; and with this capital, in a small printing office in Dover 
street, they began the business which has expanded through half a century 
into that of Harper & Brothers. 

At first the young men printed books to order, doing a part of the 
composing and press-work with their own hands. In August, 1817, they 
delivered two thousand copies of Seneca's Morals — the first book they 
printed — to Evert Duyckinck, a noted bookseller of that day ; in December 
twenty-five hundred copies of Mair's Introduction to Latin, and in April, 
1818, five hundred copies of Locke's Essay upon the Human Understanding, 
upon which the imprint of J. & J. Harper, as publishers, first appeared. 
They proceeded with characteristic care. When contemplating the publica- 
tion of a book, especially if a reprint, they sent to the leading houses in the 
trade to ascertain the number of copies each would take ; and so, slowly and 
steadily feeling their way, intent only upon good work well done, improving 
every opportunity with prompt sagacity, their business rapidly extended, and 
the firm of J. & J. Harper was soon the most eminent publishing house in 
the country. Perhaps the most femous work that bears the imprint of J. & 
J. Harper is the series known as "Harper's Family Library'' — a collection 
femiliar to every American reader during the last thirty years. The volumes 
were of convenient form, and the Library included standard and attractive 
works of every kind — such as Milman's History of the Jews, Southey's Life 
of Nelson, Gait's Life of Byron, Scott's Demonology and Witchcraft, Cun- 
ningham's Lives of the Painters, Brewster's Life of Sir Isaac Newton, Mrs. 
Jameson's Female Sovereigns, Lander's African Travels, and many more. 

Two younger brothers, Joseph Wesley and Fletcher, were apprenticed to 
the firm, and when admitted as partners the style was changed to Harper & 
Brothers; and, in 1825, the house was established at Nos. 81 and 82 Cliff 
street, upon a part of the site which their buildings now occupy. It was 
then the largest printing house in the city, employing fifty persons and ten 
hand-presses. Cliff street was a narrow street just back of Pearl, in what is 
called the Swamp, the seat of the leather trade ; but it was familiar to almost 
all American authors. When they went there and stopped at the Harpers' 
they found a small and very plain office, in which there was little room for 
idlers, and a brisk and incessant industry was everywhere apparent. They 
met a frank courtesy, clearness of statement and decision. It was strictly a 
place of business. 

In 1844, the eldest of the brothers was elected Mayor of New York, a 
position which he worthily filled ; and, about 1850 or 1851, the firm com- 
menced the publication of the Magazine^ of which it is not too much to say 
that it has completely changed the current of magazines in the country. 
Before its date the old Whig Meview^ the Knickerbocker, and GrahanCs 
Magazine were the best that had been produced. The new periodical 
immediately surpassed them, and was a source of great pecimiary profit to 
its proprietors. 

The business had so increased that on the 10th of December, 1853, it 
occupied nine large contiguous buildings full of costly machinery of every 
kind, with stores of plates and books — buildings alive with workingmen. 



170 TJI?: MEN WHO ADVEliTISH. 

humming witli industry, the monument of the skill and integrity and 
constant tlevotion to their business and to each other of the four brothers, 
when a workman threw a piece of lighted paper into what appeared to be 
a trougli of water, but which was really camphene, and in a few hours the 
buildings were a mass of smoking rubbish, and almost without insurance. 

The loss was a million of dollars; but the Brothers were immediately 
quartered at Sheffield's paper warehouse, at the corner of Beekman and 
Gold streets, and were actively engaged in renewing their business. Presses 
were employed in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston. Nothing was 
forgotten. The next monthly issue of the Magazine had been made ready, 
and it was reproduced at the earliest moment. One regular contributor, 
then ill Chicago, received the first news of the fire by a brief telegram : 
" ('Opy destroyed. Send fresh copy immediately.'' Before the ruins were 
cleared away the plans of the new buildings were ready, and the buildings 
themselves were rapidly finished, covering half an acre of ground. They 
are all of iron and brick and cement, seven stories high, towering into the 
air upon Franklin Square, not far from the East River, as if hoping to look 
across to the quiet old country homestead at Newtown. 

Other enterprises followed. In 1S56 the Weekly Avas established, and in 
1 860 the Bazar, both achieving a merited success. But last year a great 
calamity fell upon them. James Harper, the eldest brother, died from the 
effects of being thrown from his carriage. He was a man of kindly heart, 
tender and considerate to all around him, and an upright and consistent 
Christian. This blow was repeated by a second death — that of Wesley 
Harper — in less than a year. After the first of these deaths the firm was 
enlarged by the admission of several of the sons of the original partners, so 
that the second generation, who have grown up in the business, are trans- 
acting nearly all the labor. 

Their book publishing has always been conducted on the sure and safe 
plan. Nothing being accepted unless it has intrinsic merit, and then sold at a 
moderate rate, there is a certainty of success, especially when to these 
merits is added that of extensive advertising. They have been consistent 
in this, and have spent largely for fifty years in this direction. Much more 
than a million of dollars has been paid out by them for this purpose, and 
they are not now discontinuing the practice, which proves a full belief in its 
efficacy. They now publish two thousand volumes, sufficient to enable any 
man to gather a library from th«m alone. 

With Harper & Brothers one of the most prominent features has been 
the kindly consideration with which they have treated their employees. 
Many of their workmen and clerks have been with them for twenty years, 
some for thirty, some forty, and some for half a century. It presents in 
this respect a wide dittVrence from that of many American firms, and aftbrds 
an example worthy of iiiiilatinn. 



CHARLES K. LANDIS. 



Some eight or ten years ago the town of V^ineland, in NeW Jersey, was 
comparatively a wilderness. An occasional cottage nestling among the laby- 
rinth of trees, with its busy occupants toiling under the disadvantages and 
sharing the hardships of a settler's life, showed the only sign of civilization, 
and the acres upon acres of rich, mellow ground, now producing the most 
luxuriant crops and abundant harvests, were tenanted only by the beasts of 
the forests. The land was considered worthless, and nobody lived there, be- 
cause it was thought impossible to cultivate the soil. Reasoning thus in a 
circle, by assuming as correct Avhat everybody said to be true, it is probable 
that the country to this day might have remained in its normal state, had not 
a clear head detected the fallacy, and an industrious brain, by correct 
reasoning, arrived at an entirely different conclusion. To clear up this vast 
area, to cover the thousands of acres with cottages, crops, and herds, 
seemed indeed a Herculean task, but fortunately there was one man with 
will to undertake it, and, having undertaken, with energy sufficient to 
prosecute it to the desired end. The town is no longer either a wilder- 
ness or a forest, but a growing, energetic, and thriving place of ten thousand 
inhabitants, who have in their midst five churches, fifteen schoolhouses, mills, 
manufactories, railroads, and all the conveniences found in the oldest settle- 
ments of New England. These changes have been brought about by the in- 
tervention and direct agency of Mr. Charles K. Landis, and to him alone it 
is all due. Understanding the natural facilities of the location, he " bought 
the place," as New York was bought in early days, for a comparatively small 
sum, and immediately set himself at work to form a colony. This he did 
almost by advertising. Certainly there is no reader of the New England pa- 
pers, and but very few familiar with the Western, who has not heard, seen 
and read of " Vineland." It was advertised extensively, and hence attracted 
general attention; it was advertised continuously, and hence not foi-gotleu as 
soon as heard of; it was advertised in a truthful, Itiir and generous manner, 
hence people believed what they read, and then, being infiuenced thereby, 
went to see for themselves. Once there, they were more than satisfied. 
They found, contrary to custom, the half had not been told, and instead of 
coming away in disgust became immediate " squatters," bought for twenty- 
five dollars an acre what at present would sell for many times that, and 



172 • THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

set themselves at work to clear up the ground and hasten cultivation. Thus 
has been built up the most prosperous and thriving town in New Jersey ^ 
and it is this judicious system of advertising that has been instrumental, 
in a great degree, in bringing about the many happy results which one must 
see to appreciate. 

"Vineland"' is about two hours' ride from the city of Pliiladelphia, and 
the roads wind through a delightful section, thickly dotted with settle- 
ments. A ride in a buggy for an hour will show the results of cultivation 
and care. The wheat fields are innumerable, the potato patches countless,, 
and the acres upon acres of fruit-bearing vines and trees most thoroughly 
amazing in so new a country. To gaze upon the numberless fields, stretching 
out in every direction, red with the ripe and luscious berries, equaled the 
most wonderful chronicles of the Arabian Nights, and made one almost 
think himself in fairy land. Fences are unknown and unnecessary, for cattle 
never run at large, and every one takes care of his own stock. The money 
saved by economizing in this way is put into houses, barns, and improve- 
ments upon the land, and there are to be seen snug, cozy, comfortable 
places, bearing unmistakeable evidence that a large majority of the inhabit- 
ants came from the New England States. 

"Vineland" is a Avonderful place; and for a man who is willing to 
work a better cannot be found. Its rise and progress has been remarkable, 
and again we say that had it not been for the agency and influence of ad- 
vertising no such town would to-day be in existence. This is an example 
which cannot be thrown aside, disputed, or disbelieved. The facts are open 
to all, and if any one doubts them he cannot pass the day more pleasantly 
than by visiting the locality in question. 



That judicious advertising pays is no more a disputed question, A 
dealer now-a-days can open a new business, and in ten days enjoy as large a 
patronage as any other establishment, by advertising liberally and discreetly. 
Handbills and circulars are good in their way, but ten times more expensive 
than a conspicuous advertisement in the columns of a largely-circulated 
journal. Ben. Franklin said "if a man can do business he should let it be 
known." Prompt and frequent announcements of new goods or staple ar- 
ticles are read, and when the reader's eye glances over a notice of something 
that he or she wants it is natural to suppose that the advertiser will receive 
the first call or benefit. An advertisement may be perused by a dozen per- 
sons, six of whom will buy on the strength of it, and yet the dealer will be 
ignorant of the fact. Dealers have only to keep good stocks and ofter excel- 
lent inducements to purchasers, by advertising, to increase their trade vastly. 
A thorough trial will convince them that no other agency pays so well as 
the right kind of advertising. — Troy Times. 



THE PATENT MEDICINE BUSINESS. 



The profit of "patent medicines" is illustrated by some statements 
made in a recent report upon the manufacturing resources of Buifalo. It 
first mentions the success of Mr. Loveridge, the inventor of the " Wahoo 
Bitters." Another instance is that of a Mr. Swain, a poor Philadelphia book- 
binder. He had a kind of sore on his leg which troubled him very much. 
One day, as he was running over the pages of a book he was binding, his eye 
came across a recipe for making a syrup which it was said would cure 
scrofula, king's evil, and other diseases of the blood. He copied it, got some 
of the materials at the drug shop, took the medicines, and in time was 
cured. He then made some for his friends and acquaintances, and finally left 
his binder's counter and entered upon the manufacture of " Swain's Panacea." 
It began to sell, and finally its fame spread wherever civilization had gone, 
and in some parts where the people do not enjoy that blessing to this day. 
He paid enormously for advertising, and after many years he built blocks of 
stores and splendid mansions in Philadelphia, w^here they appear in all their 
magnificent proportions, the pride of the city and a monument to the 
memory of a patent medicine man. He died and left his heirs a million 
or more. 

It may be thirty-five years ago that Dr. Benjamin Brandreth made his 
debut in New York as a vender of pills. It was alleged, at the time, that he 
procured his recipe from an old man that either came over with him in the 
ship from England, or that he became acquainted with it in New York. It 
makes no matter which. When he first started in Hudson street, he was too 
poor to advertise, and for some time sold his pills by the single box until he 
acquired a suflicient sum to put a short advertisement in the Sun. As the 
pills began to sell he increased the manufacture and established agencies, in 
all cases leaving them with booksellers, never allowing druggists to sell them 
as his agents. After a while he found the druggists were selling more than 
he was manufacturing. An investigation showed that they wore an imi- 
tation article. This gave him a good chance to caution the public against 
counterfeits. In time he opened a central oflice in Broadway, above Warren 
street, which for a long time remained his principal oftice. At length he 
made terms with the druggists, and the pills became a regular article on the 
price-list of wholesale houses. After wards a sitewas purchased at Yonkers» 



174 THK MKN WHO ADVERTISE. 

where a factory was built whicli supplied the demand. A sloop carried u 
load of hogsheads of pill-boxes up, and brought a load of jtills in boxes back. 
The Doctor, probably, owns a steamboat to do his carrying business now. 
We have no means of estimating his riches. The Brandreth House, corner 
of Broadway and Canal street, is owned by him, and we presume he owns 
whole squares of other real estate in the city. 

Doctor Ayer, of Lowell, came very near ruining all his relatives aft»r 
he started his pills, sarsaparilla, and cherry pectoral. It was a tedious time 
he had in fighting, advertising bills and other expenses. He spent what 
little he had, borrowed all his relatives had, till finally his medicines began 
to make returns, and from that time, some twenty years, he has been making 
money. He owns a paper mill, where he makes a peculiar paper which he 
claims is not easily counterfeited, in which he wraps his various prepara- 
tions. People who estimate his wealth run him into millions. At one time 
he was, if he is not still, a heavy stockholder in the New- York Tribune As- 
sociation. Such men are apt to leave their imprint, even if they make their 
money in the manufacture of patent medicines. 

William B. Moffat was a silk merchant in New York. Besides being a 
bankrupt, his health had become very much impaired from overwork and 
trouble of one kind or another. In his extremity he conceived the 
idea of making a pill and bitters. They cured his infirmities and made a 
millionaire of him in less than twenty years. Persons familiar with New 
York can tell the number of magnificent stores he owns on Broadway and 
other parts of the city. He died some years ago, but the pills and bitters 
didn't. The heirs carry on the business as usual. 

Perry Davis, the pain-killer man; Donald Kennedy, proprietor of the 
great medical discovery — who has refused one hundred thousand dollars for 
his right; Seth W. Fowle, who bought Wistar's balsam of wild cherry 
from Isaac Butts, of Rochester ; Demas Barnes, of New York, the largest 
patent medicine depot in America; Hostetter, Helmbold, the Mexican mus- 
tang liniment man, and a thousand others in the United States whom we 
have not time to mention, can count their hundreds of thousands, all made 
in the patent medichie trade. Isaac Butts, of Rochester, sold the right to 
m.inufacture Wistar's balsam of wild cherry in the Eastern States to Seth 
W. Fowle, of Boston, for twenty-five thousand dollars, and put the greater 
))art of the money in telegraph stock, w^hich stock accumulated so fast that, 
with its dividends and what he had made in the Rochester Union, he has 
retired with about a million and a half, a richer if not a happier man. Rows 
of stores and blocks of land owned by him in Rochester attest the truth of 
what we write. Isaac commenced by selling Sherman's lozenges and Peters's 
pills on commission. Patent medicines have made him a princely fortune. 

Doctor Wolcott. the great pain-paint man, who was formerly a farmer, 
and who made no very remarkable sums of money at it, Avas compelled to 
follow some other business. Pain-paint has been sung by him through the 
newspapers to a remarkable extent, and the Doctor is fast accumulating a 
fortune. His office is crowded by the poor and the afflicted, and, although 
contrary to all the rules of philosophy, the Doctor cures them without 
charge. What could he have sold without advertising ? 



lARTFORD PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Among all the branches of business introduced into the notice of the 
American public within the last twenty years few equal, and none surpass in 
the prodigious quickness of its growth, the subscription book trade. 
Throughout all the extent of our country the indefatigable agents of the 
publishers are to be found, soliciting subscriptions and delivering books, 
thus enabling families to be supplied with the mental nutriment they require 
without imposing upon them the necessity of visiting some remote city or 
village. Among the companies now flourishing in Hartford, the great centre 
of this business, whose enterprise and means offer a striking illustration ot 
the advantages of liberal advertising, none are more conspicuous than the 
Hartford Publishing Company. Its extensive reputation, its high position, 
its rich connections, available for the realizing of immense returns, may be 
traced to a judicious use of the means employed in the business from which 
others have derived such large profits. 

The moving spirit in this Company is Mr. S. D. Hurlburt. He has Vjeen 
very successful in all his efforts in advancing the cause of public instruction 
through cheap books, and has aided wonderfully in the development of the 
trade. His first appearance in Hartford, as a publisher, was in connection 
With the firm of Hurlburt & Kellogg. It succeeded Mr. L. Stebbins, and 
continued to publish the books which had been brought out by its prede- 
cessor. This continued for about a year and a half, when Mr. Kellogg left. 
After this Mr. Hurlburt sold out two-fifths of his interest, and the firm was 
then named Hurlburt, Williams & Co. The first decided strike in the pub- 
lishing way by this house was by issuing Headley's History of the War. Of 
this one hundred and twenty-five thousand sets were published, and the work 
created a decided impression in all literary circles. A still further change in 
the partnership occasioned the formation of the American Publishing Com- 
pany. This house has had a deserved popularity and its sales have been 
very great. The Nurse and Spy was one of the books published about this 
time. It took excellently ; edition after edition was printed, and the work 
was translated into German. This has been followed by many other note- 
worthy productions from the pen of the most gifted writers of America. 

Mr. Hurlburt owes his success to his peculiar tact and knowledge of 
men. A hundred other men would have failed in circumstances under whch 



176 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

he has made money. Tlie agents he has chosen have been particularly good 
men, and their success has been proportionate. 

The aim of the Company has been to publish exclusively standard works by 
•eminent authors, avoiding books of the merely sensational or catchpenny order, 
such as may take the attention of illiterate readers. Productions of that kind 
have been invariably declined, however flashy; the object of the Company being 
to sustain a high standing, and to elevate the taste of readers while supplying 
them with books both attractive and useful. To furnish every facility for 
this they have shown unsurpassed liberality to agents, reserving their sales 
exclusively for them, and refusing to fill the numerous orders froora book- 
sellers which they continually receive. This scrupulous observance of good 
faith to agents secures them the entire control of the field of labor assigned 
to each, and is found in the end more profitable than a compliance with solic- 
itations from " the trade " in large cities would be. The business of the 
Company has steadily increased, and never was so flourishing as at present. 
The stock has doubled on the hands of the stockholders, and now cannot be 
obtained for purchase, being held only by a few individuals — all of them men 
of standing and position, who do not care to part with it, and who are more 
than satisfied with the handsome dividends realized from time to time. The 
.advertising bills of the Company have always been very large, and much of 
their success is thought by them to be owing to this fact. 



An experienced tradesman, who had made a fortune from advertising, 
while his competitors in business were quietly doing a careful, snug, old 
fogy business, says : " When you pay more for rent of your store than for ad- 
vertising your business, you are pursuing a false policy." It is important to 
dealers and manufacturers that they should consider carefully the immense 
advantages to be secured from a judicious and liberal system of advertising. 
Prices can be lowered and profits increased. A larger and finer stock can 
be kept on hand and a safer trade conducted. Let some dealer who has 
Tiever tried advertising to any extent set aside two hundred dollars, and 
with it advertise largely in the columns of the Times lor three months. His 
trade will double — provided he offers inducements for customers to buy of 
him — and he will have gained a valuable secret and can proceed to make a 
fortune. — Troy Times. 



A PROMIN^KNT advertisement once or twice will be effective, if followed 
ap by a steady card giving your business and address. 



OBJECTIONS ANSWERED. 



Success in any undertaking is measured by the patronage bestowed upon 
it, and by its popularity with that part of the business community interested 
therein. When prominence or reputation is sought for by selfish and unfair 
means failure is the inevitable consequence, and the natural result of such a 
course. It is, indeed, true, that honesty is the best policy; a close scrutiny 
into the affairs of this world will show this, and the personal experience of 
every man in the end demonstrates the same fact. To secure patronage for 
any length of time, a confidence between the parties must exist, and this 
confidence can only be established by a constant exercise of strict honesty 
and integrity of purpose. In no business is this truth more patent than in 
advertising agencies, and in no other occupation is dishonesty more generally 
despised and held up to public indignation. 

It is a lamentable fact that every business has its Judas, who for a 
present gain will betray the best interests of those around him, and expose 
to scorn and censure, not only his own fair name and reputation, but even 
the business itself he so basely prostitutes, in pandering to the low and 
vicious desires of personal aggrandizement. 

So many people have been swindled, and so much deceit has been 
practiced both upon the press and the public, by men calling themselves 
authorized agents, that many object for this reason to recognize any agency 
or transact business through one. 

Were every trade or profession to be judged by individual cases, we 
should be far more careful with whom we dealt, be it with the priest before 
the altar clothed in his ritualistic robes, or the man of secular business in his 
counting-house or ofiice. This principle holds good in all cases and in every 
occupation. Hence we say the objection of dishonesty, as applied to our 
business, rests on no substantial foimdation. Well-established agencies now 
exist in all parts of the country. Their beneficial effects are generally 
recognized, and they have already attained an enviable reputation and stand- 
ing in the business community. They are as fully essential to the true idea 
of the division of labor and perfection of system as agencies of any other 
kind. The principal ones now in operation have been built up and are 
continued by men of undoubted reputation, property, and standing, which 
12 



178 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

alone insures the careful execution of any orders committed to them in a 
faithful and satisfactory manner. 

Another objection fretiuently urged is that the agent, if left to select the 
papers, will do so from a poor class, of limited influence and circulation, since 
from such publications he is supposed to receive larger commissions than 
from any others. Such reasoning is imsound ; the premises are fallacious, 
and hence the conclusion necessarily falls to the ground. We have already 
endeavored to show that an agent best serves his own interests by carefully 
observing those of his patrons. This he could not do by using the class of 
papers referred to above, and therefore would himself be the loser in the end 
from such a course. Another argument fatal to this last objection raised is 
the fact that as a general rule the agent's commission from one class of papers 
is no larger than it is from any other. Commissions are not like marketable 
commodities, varying with quality or demand, but fixed amounts, agreed 
upon all over the country. There is no depreciation of value among first- 
class papers — nor is there ever any inflation among the poorest. 

Having, as we trust, fully answered this objection, we are prepared to 
go still farther and assert that, in a mere matter of dollars and cents, it is 
more for the personal interest of the agent to pursue a course exactly 
opposite to that of which he is accused, and that the only danger lies in this 
latter extreme. Suppose, for instance, a man desires to expend five hundred 
dollars in advertising any given article a certain length of time. Now, this 
can be done in say ten of our best city papers, or in fifty of a poorer class. 
Since from either the commission is the same, and since by patronizing the 
ten the labor of writing at least forty letters, examining forty additional 
papers, and paying forty additional bills is saved, we can arrive at no other 
conclusion than that stated above, namely, it is no object to the agent to 
recommend an undesirable lot of papers, but on the contrary against his 
own interest. 

We do not complain that the newspapers are wary with whom they 
deal, for they have good reason to be, but still insist that a reliable agency 
is the best possible safeguard against fraud or deception from any outside 
quarter, and this is fast being recognized by publishers in all parts of the 
country, since they solicit business from us, to assure us of their confidence, 
and advise the public to patronize us. The fact that every one who once tries 
our system expresses perfect confidence therewith is of itself significant, 
and needs no corroborating evidence of its value. Every month increases 
public confidence, and every advertiser is a public acquisition. We look for 
the time not far distant when agencies shall be more generally recognized 
and appreciated. 



Don't fear to have a small advertisement by the side of a larger com- 
peting one. The big one can't eat it up. 



GREAT AMERICAN TEA COMPANY. 



The results of the energetic and progressive characteristics of our peo- 
ple are often not only favorable to the private interests of their projectors, 
but also highly beneficial to the general public. Among the popular enter- 
prises of the day which fairly demonstrate this conclusion is that favorite 
establishment known as The Great American Tea Company, of New York 
city, whose transactions have now become so extensive as to have, in this 
market, a controlling influence in regulating the prices of those necessary 
beverages of civilized life — tea and coffee. By the heretofore prevailing 
custom, no other articles of daily consumption were ever subjected to like 
enormous acquisitions in passing between producer and consumer. This is 
more especially the case in regard to tea, almost solely an Asiatic product, 
which, by the manipulations of the foreign merchant, the broker, the im- 
porter, the speculator, the wholesaler, the retailer, etc., undergoes some 
eight or ten separate and distinct increases in profit, finally making the cost 
to the consumer from four to seven times greater than the price received by 
the native factor. 

Some nine years since a number of persons who were thoroughly famil- 
iar with all the intricacies of this trade were shrewd enough to observe the 
advantages which could be derived from founding a plan for the more direct 
and economical importation and sale of tea and coffee. Readily foreseeing 
such a scheme required a large capital and extensive business connections 
(together with a judicious system of advertising), they determined to form 
an association, and thus The Great American Tea Company was ushered into 
existence. Its business, which, from the first, has been a perfect success, in- 
cludes the purchase of all the favorite chops direct from the Chinese factors, 
thus avoiding from five to eight profits to middlemen, and giving consumers 
all the advantages secured by furnishing them the most desirable goods at a 
single and reasonable profit. From the first the Company have advertised 
largely — very largely ; indeed, very few men have ever equaled them in the 
extent to which they have carried this, and as a consequence they have be- 
come know^n in every nook and corner of the country. Again, in order to 
give the most liberal interpretation to the golden rule of " the greatest good 
for the greatest number," the Company resolved to meet the wishes of all 
by disposing of their goods in packages of all dimensions, from a pound up- 



180 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

wards. How beueficial to tlie public at large this course has proved can be 
appreciated from the fact that during the fluctuations of the currenc} for 
the last six or eight years, when at times all other articles of food have often 
been twice or thrice their former prices, the best tea and cofiee could be 
procured at merely nominal advances from The Great American Tea Com- 
pany. That it has been remunerative to the projectors and their associates 
is abundantly evident by the unprecedented extension of their business, 
which now demands, besides their great central depot in the spacious build- 
ings 31, 33, 35, and 37 Vesey street, some half a dozen other warehouses in 
different sections of New York and Brooklyn. A still further proof of their 
success was furnished not many years since, when they announced that they 
would devote a day's profits on sales to the Southern Relief Fund, from 
which that truly deserving charity realized the handsome sum of more than 
one thousand dollars. The business of this Company not only gives uni- 
versal satisfaction to its patrons, but it has also been almost unanimously in- 
dorsed by the leading newspaper press, religious as well as secular. Its op- 
erations are not confined to New York and its immediate vicinity, but have 
extended throughout the whole country, an important branch of its trade 
being to supply clubs, whose orders are received in great numbers on the 
arrival of every mail. The course adopted here is about as follows : A price 
list is issued at stated periods and mailed to those desiring them, as well as 
published in the principal newspapers. From this each member of a club, 
formed for the purpose, can select the variety of tea or coffee, and the quan- 
tity required. This is entered on a general order, which is forwanled by 
mail, directed to "The Great American Tea Company, 31, 33, 35, and 37 
Vesey street. New York City." (A safe plan is to mark on the envelope 
'•Box 5,643 P. O.") On the reception of this missive the goods are carefully 
put up, each package plainly marked with the name of the purchaser, the 
price, quality, and quantity. The whole invoice is then forwarded, as di- 
rected, thus avoiding all possible confusion in distribution, and giving each 
individual his share of the advantages derived from a division of the cost of 
transportation. Customers usually effect a saving of from one-third to one- 
half by adopting this plan. Of course the remarkable prosperity of the 
Company has been the cause of exciting the cupidity of imitators. Persons 
of ordinary intellect have usually sagacity enough to follow in the lead of 
those who can successfully carve out their own roads to fame and fortune. 
But in a great adventure, such as the one we have here described, even if all 
other features were equal, it takes at least three or four years of practical 
experience to secure the popular facilities which have proven so valuable to 
The Gieat American Tea Company, which is certainly alone and invincible 
as a specialty 



An advertisement is not always valuable in proportion to the space .t 
occupies. 



ADVERTISING AND ITS RESULTS. 



From evei-y section of the country come testimonials of the advantages 
derived from a well-regulated system of advertising. A surer or safer 
investment for business men cannot well be imagined. It puts them before 
the public in a beneficial light, they become " known and read of all men," 
and reap an abundant harvest from the seed thus sown. There can be no 
doubt of the fact; patrons declare it; newspapers assert it, and experience 
conclusively proves it. Here are a few cases gathered from various sources 
illustrating this point : 

The Adams (N. Y.) Visitor speaks of an eminent Bostonian who 
regarded an advertisement in a newspaper as a personal invitation to call, 
and said : " While I sometimes hesitate about entering a store the proprietors 
of which have not thus sent their cards to my residence, I always feel certain 
of a cordial welcome from the members of an advertising firm." 

The same paper adds : " There is in this remark an iissurance of one of 
the many results of advertising. The trader and his calling become identified, 
and the name of a man is inseparably connected in the mind of the public 
with his merchandise. It may not be the veiy day an advertisement appears 
that it bears its fruit ; weeks or months may elapse, and then, when the want 
arises, the article to be obtained immediately suggests the advertiser. This 
is the efliect of general advertising when persistently followed. A special 
class of advertising where some novelty is announced is more immediate. 

" A shrewd business man once advertised a trifling article in a manner 
which could scarcely prove remunerative. His neighbors expressed their 
regret at his folly, but he appeared contented. Though his gross sales of 
the article did not cover the cost of his advertising, he attracted a new" class 
of people to his store, and his shrewdness paid him in a very short time, for 
new eyes saw what he had to oifer in addition to the specialty advertised, 
and new purses came under contribution to him." 

The Indianola (Ind.) Visitor relates this incident: "In 1861, a young 
man was employed in this place as a clerk in a house, at the moderate sum 
of four dollars per week. In the fall of 1862 he went into a small business 
on his own hook. In 1863 he formed a copartnership with his brother. 
When the senior of this firm threw his little bark on the sea of public tra<le, 
we suggested to him how to advertise. He took our advice — followed it 
strictly to the letter — using more printer's ink than all the business firms of 



182 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Indianola combined. The result of our advice, togetlier with the honesty, 
integrity, and go-aheadativeness of this firm, has given them a competency 
and foothold among the people of Warren that will tell ' big' in after years." 

A Western cotemporary says : " Advertising is to the trader what 
ploughing is to the farmer. There would be some natural production if the 
sod of the earth was never broken, and it would hold about the same relation 
to the production of a cultivated garden that the profits of unadvertised 
trade do to the advertised.'' 

Another declares that, " Now-a-days nobody but the slowest dried-up 
old fossils ever question the advantage of advertising. One might with as 
much propriety donbt the evidence of his own eyes and ears. The style and 
extent of a business man's advertising is a sure test of his energy and 
capacity, the quantity and quality of his stock, and the amount of business 
he transacts." 

Prentice, of the Louisville Joxirnal, tenders his advice to the ])ublic, 
" Never buy goods of those Avho don't advertise. They sell so little that 
they have to sell dear." 

The Brandon (Wis.) Thnes^ grows facetious on the subject and vents 
itself as follows: "Does it pay to advertise? Our experience teaches us 
that it does. A week ago we advertised for a boy to learn the printer's 
trade. Imagine our surprise (!) on Monday morning on finding at our 
domicile an applicant weighing just eight pounds and a half We would 
not guarantee to all such returns by patronizing the printer, but this is one 
instance where it was a success." 

Says the Delaware liejniblican: "We believe it is a rule, with scarcely 
an exception, that in every community the merchants who advertise are 
most successful, and deservedly so. They are the men who keep the best 
stocks of goods and sell cheapest." 

The following comes from a New York paper : " The changes going on 
in society make it necessary for a business man to keep before the people. 
If he expects to succeed in trade, a fair statement of what he is doing, and 
will do, is necessary for himself and those dealing with him. He must make 
this statement, and does do it in some way if he sells anythmg. 

" People are quite apt to go where their attention is called, and if they 
find things as represented they will purchase there in preference to s])ending 
their time seeking elsewhere. Those whose patronage and influence are of 
the greatest value never spend too much time in looking up a thing. They 
have learned that time is money, and that without time in tliis world money 
is worthless. It is conclusive tliat there is merit as well as profit in adver- 
tising honestly and fairly, in telling peojde what and how you will do, and 
then doing it. Those who are willing to trade strictly uj)on principle can 
circulate an advertisement throughout an entire community, and it will have 
just as much force as though they spoke to each individual by word, or each 
visited tlieir establishment and examined for himself This advertising only 
amounts to the same as telling your patron when he calls on you how you 
will sell to him. 

"It is just to all concerned to advertise conscientiously, and those who 
do it will find advertising of the utmost importance." 



HOSTETTER & SMITH. 



Of the many men who have acquired fame and fortune by judicious ad- 
vertising, none will be more readily and familiarly recognized than Hostet- 
ter & Smith, manufacturers of Stomach Bitters, at Pittsburg, Pa. Since the 
sale of the first bottle of bitters by this firm they have, by a strict regard to 
the manufacture of the articles furnished, and a keen foresight into the means 
of making it celebrated, drifted into that channel that leads to fortune. 

In November, 1853, these gentlemen embarked in the business with a 
capital of ten thousand dollars. They occupied dingy quarters in a remote 
street of the city, but, meeting with such encouragement the first year, they 
soon after removed to a more popular thoroughfare, and took possession of 
a much larger establishment. The lapse of a few years again necessitated 
another removal to still more commodious quarters, fronting on Water 
street, running through to First avenue, covering about an acre of ground, 
which they occupy to this day. The sales of bitters during the first year the 
firm were engaged in the business amounted to thirty thousand dollars, and 
the increase has been so great that the sales for the year 1869 reached one 
million and twelve thousand dollars, while the returns of the present year 
are expected to exceed this sum by half a million dollars. 

The amount of money invested directly in the manufacture of bitters is 
estimated at three hundred thousand dollars, of which sum fifty thousand was 
incurred in fitting up a printing department. Thrice the before-mentioned 
amount has been expended in the purchase of business houses at San Fran- 
cisco, New Orleans, and other large cities where the firm have established 
agencies. 

The printing department embraces a portion of the main building, and 
consists of three departments over two hundred feet in length, used exclu- 
sively for the publication of almanacs. The first story contains ten presses, 
which are in operation the year round, three of which work entirely on 
almanacs of the English language, the others printing these little volumes in 
the German, French, Spanish, Norwegian, Welsh, Swedish, Dutch, and Bohe- 
mian languages. The second is filled with machinery for binding, backing, 
and pressing books, while the third department has eight folding machines. 
Industrious little workers they are, from morning until night. One hundred 
persons find constant employment in these departments, and the result of 



1^4 THE MEN ^VIIO ADVERTISE. 

their labor last year was in tnrnin<r out six and a half million almanacs, while 
the number for next year will be ten millions. 

The department for the manufacturlngof bitters is three stories in lieight, 
and provided with improved facilities for the accomplishment of the work of 
ri'ducino' the ingredients composing the tonic in as short a time as they will 
permit. About eighty-five persons are engaged in this department, who, on 
an average, fill and arrange for shipping six thousand bottles of bitters each 
day. The manner of filling, sealing, labeling, and packing is quite ingenious, 
and performed with astonishing rapidity. It has long been a rule of this 
establishment to sell no order less than fifty dozen bottles, and it is not an 
uncommon occurrence for a steamboat to leave the port of Pittsburgh with a 
cargo consisting entirely of Hostetter's Bitters, destined for the South and 
West. The article is also exported to South and Central America; to the 
East India Islands, Australia, Cuba, and the Canadas, in immense quantities. 

In the printing department of Hostetter & Smith, at Pittsburg, over til- 
teen thousand reams of white paper are consumed annually in the publication 
of almanacs alone, these little books costing the present year one hundred 
and fifty-seven thousand dollars. These are distributed very judiciously, not 
one being allowed to leave the establishment unless by an order from those 
engaged in selling the bitters. 

In newspaper advertising the firm expended during the year 1869 the 
sum of one hundred and twenty thousand dollars, which is increased propor- 
tionately year by year. Handsomely-framed cards, gold lettered, in the Chinese 
and Japanese languages, are made for distribution in those countries, and 
thousands and thousands of elegantly-lettered a*ud highly-embellished cards, 
costing a deal of money, are gratuitously sent to druggists in the difterent 
parts of America. 

" In the early years of our business,'" says Dr. Hostetter, " we kept our- 
selves in the keenest of poverty in order to use our money in advertising an 
article we felt sanguine would one day acquire us reputation and fortune. 
At that time we had no standard price for our bitters, preferring rather to 
allow the seller to reap the profit, while we were satisfied to know that the 
article was bought, and that good remuneration did in nowise lessen the en- 
ercyy of the seller. As years passed by we more and more extensively com- 
mentled our bitters through the newspaper channel und by means of ahna- 
nacs, thereby creating an incessant demand, actually compelling druggists 
ar.d others to keep the article at the risk of losing customers. Thus we pro- 
gressed, until to-day Hostetter's Bitters can be obtained in almost any part 
of the globe." 



A SHORT advertisement four times is better than a very long one once. 
Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is better." 



LTPPINCOTT & BAKEWELL. 



This firm are engaged in the manufafture of axes, saws, and shovels, at 
Pittsburg, Pa., and their works are accounted the largest of the kind in the 
United States. The notoriety acquired by this firm has been of slow growth, 
and, until the last few years, was confined to a limited territory, but to-day, 
by the adoption of judicious means, their wares are known and purchased in 
almost every city, town, and hamlet in America. 

The works of this firm are situated on either side of Lippincott's lane, 
in the Eighth Ward, and occupy almost three acres of ground. In the year 
1847, when first established, facilities for the manufacture of the articles en- 
gaged in by the firm were astonishingly meagre in comparison with those of 
the present day, an opportunity for judging of this fact liaving been left 
standing in the shape of the original building wherein t^ie first axe was 
made. The groAvth of the works has been steady and uninterrupted, to- 
day employing upwards of two hundred and twenty-five men, and con- 
suming thousands of tons of Swedish iron annually. Suspension of opera- 
tions is unknown here. Possibly no works of a similar character in the coun- 
try are run more steadily. 

In the manufacture of axes Lippincott & Bakewell stand without a 
rival, and their extensive sale and fast-increasing demand tell the story of 
their universal popularity. All styles of chopping axes are made but the 
brand i old in excess of all others is the " Red Jacket," an instrument that 
has found its way into the hands of almost every lumberman from Maine to 
Texas. On every working day one thousand axes are made, though there 
are instances where the number reaches seven thousand in a week. The 
brand already alluded to is the most carefully manipulated and closely scru- 
tinized of all, though no instrument is allowed to leave the works un- 
til the owners are assured that it is perfect in every respect. In the manu- 
facture of shovels and saws an immense trade is done, employment in the 
latter-named branch of the business being given to about seventy-five skill- 
ful mechanics. The saws made are principally of the circular pattern, very 
large, and sufficiently powerful to pierce the most formidable stick of timber 
ever grown. The departments for making axes, saws, and shovels are 
separate from each other, and each under the control of a manager. 

It is but a few years since Lippincott & Bakewell commenced adver- 



186 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

tising extensively their business through the newspapers, and tliey have 
found, by a sudden and an astonishing increase in sales, that the step was 
wisely taken, inasmuch as it has augmented their trade to an extent they had 
no idea it would ever reach, and served also to dispose, in a great measure, 
of quite a quantity of that unlimited credit system of sale so prevalent in 
most business of the kind. There are few men that have more admiring 
shrewdness, more consummate business tact, and a keener foresiglit than the 
members of this firm. Young, progressive and generous, tliey are sure to 
stand one day in the rank of the millionaires. 



Advertiseks frequently forget one very important point. Strike often 
in the same place. Don't waste your energies on a hundred undertakings 
and dissipate your money in twice as many places as you have means to 
fill. The woodcutter, when he desires to fell a tree, endeavors to have every 
blow follow the former, and to repeat its impression. If he does not do 
this, he may be an hour in cutting down a pine no larger than a stove-pipe, 
while if he repeats, with well-trained accuracy, the blows of the axe for five 
minutes, the tree is down. Notices inserted in newspapers must be placed 
there on some such rule. Only continual iteration will catch the public eye, 
and it must be done on a well-digested plan. Every line should be con- 
sidered beforehand, every phrase measured, every idea weighed. Then 
strike, continually and with all your might. So are the golden sands of 
wealth gathered, not by idleness and lack of forethought. 



"A DULL tool wastes time, and is never used except by a dull fellow." 
True as preaching. Doing business, or attempting to do it in this age with- 
out advertising, is like using a dull tool, and the merchant who tries it is, 
generally speaking, a dull fellow. Not one man in a thousand who ad- 
vertises liberally and judiciously, fails of success, while there are hundreds 
who never succeed at all, merely because they have not the pluck to si)end a 
portion of their profits in making known to purchasers their whereabouts, 
and what they have to sell. Attempting to do business without advertising, 
is like using a dull tool, when a keen, sharj) one, lies within reach. — Phila- 
delphia Itetn. 



GEO. P. ROWELL & CO. 



AN INSIDE VIEW OF AN" ADVERTISING AGENCY. 

From the Boston Commercial Bulletin. 

A French traveler, in journeying through the East, met in Persia a 
sage versed in all the wisdom of the Orient. He had acquired some 
knowledge of the French tongue, and the reading of a newspaper from 
Paris excited in him the most lively delight. Of all, however, which he 
found in its columns the fourth page, which commonly is filled with adver- 
tisements, occasioned his wonder the most. "The fourth page," said he, 
"cannot be thoroughly understood except by a sage. He who invented it 
was a benefactor of humanity. In a singularly narrow space he has con- 
trived to collect the most valuable information — the honorable marriages 
which have taken place in the best circumstances of fortune, the houses on 
sale or to be let, the best works, and above all the most venerable and 
precious medicines." Such seem to the East the notices which give life and 
vitality to our newspapers, and without which they would aftbrd each day 
only the scantiest measure of news. Nearly all men who do business believe 
in advertising, but of these few know how it can well be done, and still 
fewer have any conception of the magnitude of the sums of money paid 
yearly for publicity. To some extent we propose to shed light on this by 
giving an account of an advertising agency. 

There was little advertising done either in New York or in America 
when Thomas wrote his History of Printing, in the year 1810. The press 
was weak, the circulation of newspapers was small, and but few business 
announcements then appeared compared with the multitude which now 
crowd the columns of the metropolitan and country press. Two thousand 
was then a large circulation for a daily in New York or Philadelphia, and 
the value of a large newspaper establishment in this city twenty years later 
was estimated at about thirty thousand dollars, which was also the sum of its 
annual receipts. There are now in the United States five hundred periodicals 
valued at a higher figure than this, and the circulation of a single daily in 
New York is now greater than that of the entire press of our country sixty 
years ago. The men who now conduct papers here are not the same as 
the Colemans and the Langs of former years. The most successful news- 
paper we have was founded by a Scotch adventurer, inured to hardship and 
toil, and the next two most successful dailies were established by journey- 
men printers without capital. Hard, practical sense all these men had; they 



188 THE MEX WHO ADVERTISE. 

refonnt'd the business, purged away old abuses, infused new life into every 
channel, and made the American press the most important of the world. 
Not England herself, with the gigantic Times, flanked by a multitude of 
lesser sheets, has such a newspaper press as Ave, that daily, through six hun- 
dred voices, and weekly through five thousand, discusses empires, and makes 
and unmakes reputations. The time has gone by when the editor .should be 
addressed as Mr. Printer; his functions have grown and are still growing to 
an importance unequaled by the pulpit or the bar. The character of our 
newspapers increases as the wealth and talent required becomes greater. 
Our manners have at least grown better, if our disposition is the same. 

James Gordon Bennett, with many other things, did one act which 
should entitle him to the gratitude of all newspaper publishers everywhere. 
He introduced the system of paying cash for advertising, now common 
enough, but xmknown in 1833, and concurrently with Mr. Beach of the Sun 
encouraged the insertion of tn^o, three, or four line notices. Before, those 
ponderous sheets which gave light to the Xew Yorkers at eight or nine in 
the morning afforded no opportunity for wants to be made known. A square 
was taken by the merchant for a year, and he filled it, and no more, with 
advertisements of his own business. If a China tea merchant had found 
that unexpected facilities would give him the command of the tea market 
for a while, and that he should be able to undersell his competitors, he did 
not think it worth while to announce it for a month or two in extra space, 
nor did the editor and proprietor of the journal, who at that time were 
nearly always one and the same, deem it of any advantage to try to accom- 
modate him. It was reasoned that if they let people have a square for a 
month or two they would not occupy it for the rest of the year, and that it 
was better to have one man for a whole year than three or four for a short 
indefinite time, with a possibility that others might succeed them in their 
places. As we look upon it now, with the light of experience, it seems 
great nonsense, for there are always wants occurring and sales happening. 

Not so did the vivacious Herald or the wide-awake Sun commence their 
great busipess. Put in your advertisement to-day and to-morrow take it 
out, if you like, and pay fifteen, tAventy, twenty-five cents a notice. It pays 
handsomely if a column can be filled with them, and the penny press Avas 
not long in finding it out. With the increased circulation Avhich they 
attained there soon came to be a marked difference between the respective 
values of different dailies. Before, an advertisement Avas inserted at random, 
or in accordance Avith the politics of the advertiser; noAv, for the first time, 
did circulation and worth enter into the calculation. Inquiries Avere made 
among those Avho best should knoAV, and journals employed solicitors to pi'o- 
cure business for them by representing their superior advantages. In this 
they followed the custom of all mercantile establishments, in highly civilized 
communities. An advertising agent is nothing but a broker, Avho deals in 
advertisements as other brokers deal in teas or gold, and his success depends 
chiefly upon his ability as a buyer and his connections in selling. 

The earliest of the advertising agents Avho became knoAvn as conl rolling 
much custom Avas V. B. Palmer of Boston. For many years he was the 
most noted man in the business, but became supplanted by others. He was 



THE MEN WHO ADV^ERTISE. 189 

succeeded by many well-known men, who by their enterprise and skill did 
much towards building up the business. Some agents made contracts for 
space, and paid for it in New York correspondence, and many both then and 
after tried to induce the publisher to take " cats and dogs" in return for 
advertising. Such days are happily gone by; and advertising agents 
of reputation now pay only in cash, and have nothing to do with the system 
of barter. 

Every legitimate business depends for success upon its power to secure 
the confidence and approval of the public. If it has no real value, the mer- 
cantile community will soon make the discovery and withdraw patronage 
from it. An agency for advertising is founded upon a real, practical 
want, and the future or the present cannot dispense with it more than it 
can with banks or insurance companies. Advertising is founded upon the 
great, fundamental truth that he who desires to sell the most must have the 
widest acquaintance and be the best known. When society is aggregated in a 
Robinson Crusoe or in the cabin of a Mayflower it is practicable for any 
man to know everybody, but when civilization advances into complexity it 
can no longer be done. In our own country this is especially true. There is 
no common centre. Twenty cities dispute the supremacy of the future, and 
four millions of square miles of territory forbid any one except special- 
ists from knowing the country even approximatively. Ask a wholesale 
grocer in Providence or Albany if he knows any one in his own line in 
Louisville or Wheeling, and he will be obliged to confess that he does not. 
If he sells a bill of goods to either city he makes an inquiry at a mercantile 
agency, who are specialists in this line. It will be found so in every branch 
of commerce, and it is becoming increasingly more difiicult to obtain this 
knowledge at first hand. In 1810 a man with a moderately good memory 
could tell the names of all journals printed in the United States; w^hat 
Magliabecciiia or Watts could do it now ? 

Among the well known advertising agencies that of Geo. P. Rowell cfc 
Co. is prominently betore the public at this time. They began business 'n 
1865, and now occupy spacious rooms in the New York Times building — that 
great beehive of typographical and editorial industry. With the adjacent build- 
ing, which joins it so closely, and matches it in magnitude so well, it is the great- 
est workshop of brains and type in the world. At the two ends are the New 
York Times and the World; Moore's Rural JSTew- Yorker sends forth its 
mammoth sheet from here, as does also the Scientific American, the Exam- 
iner, the Albion, Hearth and Home, the Observer, the Tnrfi Field and Farm, 
and a score of lesser periodicals. Half the advertising agents in the United 
States are located here, and from their oflices emanate fully nine-tenths of 
the business orders which the press of the country receives through agencies. 
Many correspondents and writers of the daily press have here rooms, besides 
a celebrated firm of short-hand writers, and lawyers and patent-agents rnt 
numbers. Two hundred writers for the press find employment as well 
as double tliat number of printers ; the amount of money invested in news- 
paper property will not fall short of two millions, and the sheets turned 
forth from the press yearly would carpet the equator on land and throw 
a floating bridge over the Atlantic and Pacific seas. With all the immense 



190 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

wealth employed in newspaper publishing, however, it is the advertising 
business which is the principal within the four walls bounded by Beekman 
and Nassau streets. Park Row and Printing House Square. Nearly five 
millions of dollars' worth of advertisements annually pass through the hands 
of the enterprising business men of this block. 

In preparing to make known to the world the commodity in which 
he deals, the advertiser is often governed by chance, although some- 
times he has had an opportunity to serve an apprenticeship to the art 
in the business of some skillful man. In this case, his way is made easy, and 
he does at once what the novice will only be able to do after years of trial, 
but to which he must certainly attain if he continues in the business. Expe- 
rience is a hard master, but it does finally teach us something. An adver- 
tiser frequently goes into an agency without knowing really what he wants, 
and it is in this case the duty of the agent to give him light. After entering 
the office of George P. Rowell & Co., and stating his business, the first 
point to be considered is to know whether the dealer really has an idea as 
to what he wants. If he has, the path of the agent is made much easier, and 
he takes the size, the time of the advertisement, and the papers it is to appear 
in, and makes an estimate. The estimate is arrived at by the use of a long 
row of tall books, ranging from A to Z, to be found in the business office, 
and which contain the rates of all the newspapers in the country, with the 
exceptions and variations allowed in certain cases. Some newspapers adhere 
to their prices under all circumstances, and these are very pleasant for the 
agent to deal with; but, unhappily, their numbers are few, probably not 
exceeding ten or fifteen in the Avhole Union. Another large class have 
prices presumed to be invariable, but from which they bend at particular 
times and under particular circumstances, as for instance in summer, when 
business is light. These facts must be considered, and allowance made by 
the agent, or some acute rival will underbid him. A third class of news- 
papers have a professed price, from which they give deductions to any one 
who comes along, if they think that otherwise they will lose a few squares. 
These comprise a majority of those in the United States, and they are 
extremely perplexing to deal with. To one agent they will allow thirty per 
cent, commission ; to another only twenty. The second will presume that 
he receives the bottom figures while he does not, and another man may carry 
away the prize. This class of journals also frequently takes pianos, sewing- 
machines, life insurance policies, washing-machines, soap, and so on, in 
exchange for their columns. It requires vast experience and careful judg- 
ment to know at what price to estimate, and an agent may frequently err 
and receive from the proprietor a letter inquiring with Ilazael, " Is 
thy servant a dog that he should do this thing?" A fourth class 
is of those gazettes which have no regular scale of prices, but seek to make 
the best bargain they can. They are not particular as to what they get, so 
Ion"- as they get something. Then, after having made up his list, the agent 
hands it to the visitor, who considers it, and, after examining the estimates of 
other agencies supposed to be responsible, decides between them. For 
instance, a computation may vary from ten hundred to twelve hundred 
dollars on the same papers, by different men. Every house in the business 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 191 

is invited to figure on the list, and the lowest bidder, all other things being 
equal, takes the order. It frequently happens that a low bid will be made 
by an irresponsible man, or a man in bad odor among the press. In 
this case it may be safely supposed that he intends to cheat; either the 
advertiser by making contracts for less time, or in less valuable place 
than agreed upon, trusting that there will be no examination, or the news- 
papers, by swindling some with whom he never intends to deal again. Few 
newspaper men will sue an irresponsible agent, as in that case they not only 
lose their original money, but their time and costs. 

Supposing, however, that the advertiser simply says that he has one or 
two thousand dollars which he wishes to use to the best advantage in adver- 
tisements. In this case, all the skill of the agency comes in play. A dollar 
will go twice as far in one place as another, and, although the advertiser may 
not know it, one periodical has eight times as much influence as another. 
An advertiser recently stated to us that of an advertisement inserted by him 
in five hundred newspapers in the Union, one journal with a circulation less 
than five thousand proved to be of more value than the same inserted in 
another with two hundred thousand. All these shades of importance must 
be considered and allowed for; the circulation, the politics, the clearness of 
printing, the time the newspaper has been established, the ability with which 
it is edited, and its worth for other purposes. It is of little value for the 
New York Weekly to advertise in the Journal of Commerce; it will pay 
twice as well to insert a notice in the Lyons Mepublican, with half the circu- 
lation and one quarter the price. If the advertiser applies at first hand to 
the newspapers themselves to learn their circulation and influence, he will be 
surprised to find that they all have the largest circulation and all reach the 
best class of readers in that section. He cannot investigate, but an adver- 
tising agency can. By constant inspection of the papers, letters from the 
editors, inquiries, and occasional personal interviews, they are able pretty 
well to place the true position of the sheet, although they may not be within 
one or two himdred of their circulation. Newspaper proprietors give truer 
answers to agents than to the public; if they should state anything widely 
diff'ering from the facts they know it would not be believed by the agents, 
who are in possession of ample information the public has not. Another 
consideration is position. An advertiser frequently desires to have the 
widest extent possible for his orders, and so a good paper in the East may 
be sacrificed for one not so good in the West. 

The advertiser having selected his papers or approved a list submitted 
to him, the inquiry naturally arises. Where does the profit of the agency 
come from? From the newspaper, and from the newspaper only.'^ No 
reputable agency will charge for labor not done, and the firm of which we 
write keep their business in such order that every evidence can be sub- 
mitted that the business is accomplished. Most newspapers in the United 
States allow a commission of twenty-five per cent.; some give thirty or 
thirty-three, while others give only twenty or fifteen. The latter is the 
customary rate of discount on the New York dailies of importance, and also 
of the same class in other great cities, while the smaller give twenty and 
twenty-five. This commission would be considered enormous in almost any 



192 THE MEN WHO ADVKRTLSE. 

other department of trade, but wlien the insi<;niticanee of tlie shigle orders is 
considered, and the immense amount of detail required to keep the run of a 
business so complicated, the remuneration is not found to be more than 
adequate. Agents doing business in a small M^ay find their actual cash 
expenses of i-ent, clerk hire, postage, etc., amount to fully fifteen per cent, 
of their gross business, and from the amount which they receive above this 
must come the losses from bad debts, and their own profits. Few adver- 
tising agents have been successful in a pecuniary point of view, and those 
only have made fortunes who by their strict business habits and close atten- 
tion through long years of labor would have conquered prosperity in what- 
ever calling they might have adopted. Many newspapers have special 
contracts with agents, by which a column, for instance, is bought for a year 
by the agents at a fixed price, while he lets them out in small advertise- 
ments at double that rate, taking the contingency of filling them. It is only 
the strongest establishments that can do this, as it is necessary to be able to 
fill the space with something. Many of the agents have lists of fifty and 
one hundred papers, where you can only insert an advertisement in one by 
putting it in all. On this, if they can keep the column full, they will make 
a large percentage, but, as it can only be kept so with the greatest exertion, 
it may be doubted whether all advertising agencies who do this make 
money. In the hands of George P. Kowell & Co., who originated the list 
system, however, and with'their facilities, this has been very productive, espe- 
cially as it has afli'orded an opportunity for advertising themselves very 
hirgely. Without losing money on their contracts, they have been enabled 
to advertise their agency in this way to the extent of more than one hundred 
thousand dollars since commencing business. This has given them a wide 
reputation, and has likewise been productive of money. Thousands 
of new advertisers start up every year, desiring to exten<l their business, 
and of these half who do any business at all transact it with this firm. They 
receive the new business by paying out money themselves for advertising, 
and as a reward for their enterprise they are at this time better known and 
control a larger patronage than any similar establishment. 

The contract made with an advertiser, the firm goes to work to execute its 
part of the agreement. As to determine the length of the advertisement and 
its general apj)earance it is necessary to set it up in type, this is done before 
completing the arrangement. An acute advertiser, who wishes to have his an- 
nouncement produce its full force, desires to control the arrangement of the 
lines, and the display, so far as possible, and in manuscript this cannot be done. 
Errors are more easily seen in print than elsewhere, and many egregious 
blunders have thus been corrected. With these considerations of carefulness 
and neatness, that of economy was also powerful in inducing the firm to 
establish the printing office which they have connected with their establish- 
ment. To send out a ten-line advertisement to a Job office, and get ten 
coi)ies, costs not less than a dollar, while it can be done for forty cents at 
their own place. When it is considered that twenty or thirty such Jobs are 
afforded a day, it can be conceived without troul)le how much money is 
saved. A printing office of their own also aft'ords a much quicker and more 
expeditious manner of doing the thing, for while an advertiser is debating 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 193 

as to the price and the space his notice will require it can be set up 
an d shown. This is the only agency in the United States which is sup- 
plied with this convenience, and perhaps the only one the magnitude of 
whose business requires it. With skilled men whose whole business it is 
to set up advertisements, they are enabled to please their patrons, and by 
judicious selections of type and a careful study of the effect to be produced, 
it often happens that an advertisement may be reduced in space and at the 
same time rendered more conspicuous, thus serving its purpose better 
and costing less money in the high-priced journals for which it is intended, 
sometimes constituting a saving of hundreds of dollars on a single 
order. In this office they have all the styles of type which are used in news- 
paper establishments. Two presses are kept constantly going on the job 
work of the place, and six compositors are fully employed. One of the fonts 
of type in this office is truly remarkable, as it is the largest ever cut of this 
style and size. It is of nonpareil full-face, and is used in the Newspaper 
Directory for the names of newspapers and places, and to a very large extent 
in miscellaneous job work. The font of nonpareil Roman has three thousand 
pounds, and there is a font of long primer ot over one thousand, besides smaller 
ones of pica, brevier, and agate. Everything here is kept neatly and in order ; 
every bit of copy is preserved, and a duplicate of the printing entered in a 
huge folio. Type is not to be seen on the floor, but in the cases, and it 
is altogether a model printing office. In one part are stacks of stationery 
ready for the use of the establishment — a course highly necessary when it is 
recollected that near half a million of envelopes are used yearly, and that 
four hundred dollars has been paid out for postage in a single day. No 
work is done for others here, as there is enough for the office to be kept 
fully employed on the work of the firm alone. 

When the printing of the order has been done, the original copy (with 
its printed duplicate attached), after being charged upon the books, is 
stamped with the date and endorsed with the initial of the person who 
makes the contract, after which it is transferred to the clerk who holds the 
order book, and he enters it with all its directions. This is the copy 
which is referred to in cases of dispute, and is therefore preserved with 
great care. Letters are addressed to the journals in which it is designed the 
advertisement shall appear, with full and explicit printed directions, and the 
clerk so sending them out affixes his initials to each order, so that the 
person through whom the business is transacted may be always known. 
No letter is directed personally to the editor or proprietor of a paper, but to 
the newspaper itself This is of value, because letters addressed personally 
are frequently held back on account of absence. 

In some cases advertisements are sent out for inquiry. A proof is fur- 
nished, and the question is asked. Will you insert this for so much ? or. How 
much will you put this in for ? An advertiser frequently wishes to insert a 
given advertisement, say three months, for a certain sum, say one thousand 
dollars, in as many country newspapers as he can. That sum might insert 
twenty lines in two hundred papers for that time, and it might in two hun- 
dred and fifty. Having fixed a very low price, probably three dollars, the 
13 



194 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

advertisement is dispatched to five hundred periodicals. Some refuse, some 
pay no attention; but enough will usually insert to make up the required 
number. If otherwise, the offers are accepted which seem lowest from among 
those which reply. Publishers who read this will do well to bear in mind 
that when refusing an offer made they should always name a price at which 
they will accept. Much surprise is sometimes felt and expressed by conven- 
tions of coimtry editors, on account of the low prices offered to them. 
They should bear in mind that to receive an offer does no harm, and if the 
job is not worth doing at the price, they cannot be compelled to accept it. 
Those papers which are known to adhere strictly to their rates are never 
included on lists of this kind except by mistake. 

Geo. P. Rowell & Co. have many customers who expend with them 
from five to twenty-five thousand dollars a year each, and some who go up 
to forty and fifty thousand dollars. None of these are novices in the busi- 
ness, and they go to this firm simply because they can through them get 
their work done cheaper than elsewhere. They made a contract last year to 
insert an advertisement in every newspaper in the United States, daily, semi- 
weekly, tri-weekly, weekly, semi-monthly, monthly, and quarterly, on which 
they received as first payment ten thousand dollars in cash before a single 
copy was sent out. Immense sums of money are thus paid out by 
acute business men. Dr. Brandreth has spent two millions and a half of 
dollars on his medicines in making them known ; Holloway expended six 
hundred thousand dollars last year for the same purpose. The largest 
advertiser within the last two or three years has been Helmbold, but the 
most money ever expended for this purpose in this country in a short time 
was for the Government bonds and to hasten the completion of the Pacific 
Railroad. It is believed that Geo. P. Rowell & Co. advertise their own 
business to a greater extent than any other firm in the country, and yet their 
net profits for last year were as large as ever before — a proof that adver- 
tising pays. Having completed the sending forth of the advertising orders, 
the return of the newspapers is anxiously looked for. 

Let us walk into the newspaj^er room and watch the system which is 
so elaborately contrived to meet the possible wants of the advertiser that it 
may be said to meet all requirements. All the rooms in the New York 
Times building are high and well lighted, and this is consequently no 
exception. Three lofty windows give amjsle illumination, attbrding every 
facility to examine newspapers with care. To this room come all the 
periodicals received at the establishment. At a quarter past eight in the 
morning the first newspaper mail arrives — a huge plethoric bag, filled to 
repletion with newspapers and the periodical literature of the day. In the 
afternoon others come, as full as the preceding, and on Mondays twice this 
quantity is received. The mail l)ags are unloosened and the contents taken 
out; the wrappers are torn off and the papers partially unfolded, so that 
they may lie with the date and name uppermost, and then begins the sorting. 
As the contents of the bags come from every State in the Union, and from 
the British Provinces also, it is necessary to separate them into different 
heaps. This one is New P^ngland : that one New York ; the next Pennsyl- 
vania, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, an<l the District of Cclxoibia. 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 195 

Here is the South; that is Canada and the other British Provinces; the 
Pacific States have one pile, and the other Western States are divided into 
two — Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois forming one, and the remainder another. 
This is only the rough approximation ; each of these little liiUocks are again 
divided into States, and then each State is arranged alphabetically, so that 
there may be no lost time turning over the leaves of the entry book. Then 
the clerk in charge of this sits down with his book, a huge folio, before 
him, and receipts eA^ery newspaper which comes into the place. If a 
receipt is not to be found on the book, it is a proof that the newspaper has 
not arrived, and the file is consequently faulty. If it is desirable to 
have the paper, it being one which advertisers frequently use, a polite 
note is sent in printed form, saying that the Banner of Freedom is not re- 
ceived regularly, and trusting that the error may be remedied. If it is a 
deficiency in a particular date, another form is sent out, specifying the time. 
There are frequent omissions, and letters of this tenor have consequently to 
be much used, and caution has to be exercised in another respect. Mails are 
frequently delayed, and the daily which should be due this morning may not 
arrive until to-morrow. The quantity of mail matter received at this office 
is much larger than at any other establishment in the United States. The 
Monday mail is the largest, as more weeklies are published on Thursday, 
Friday, and Saturday than on other days of the week, and it takes about 
that length of time to get to New York. 

In calling ofl:' the different dailies and weeklies to the checking clerk the 
reader separates out those which belong to different departments. Two 
men manage one special list, two others another, one has New York city, 
and the others are divided around. Each of these men opens out the paper 
before him, and looks after the advertisement which should be there. A 
black crayon is drawn at the top and bottom of the notice, and an entry is 
made of the fact in another book. A single mark indicates the insertion of 
the advertisement; a second shows that it is in correctly, and in cases 
where position has been specified to denote that it is actually where it 
should be. This done, the papers are folded up to one uniform size, and 
each is inserted in its appropriate pigeon-hole. Here it is for future reference 
for three months, and is then withdrawn for new papers to come. It is kept 
nine months after this, properly arranged and labeled, so that it may be 
known, and is finally sold for old j^aper. There are enough pigeon-holes 
around the room for every newspaper in the United States, and they are 
classified alphabetically by States, so that no one need have a moment's 
hesitation in laying his hand on any paper. If the paper is not received, the 
box is left vacant; if publication has stopped, a large card is put in marked 
" suspended." All the pigeon-holes are labeled, so that a novice can find a 
paper as well as an experienced man, and everything throughout this room, 
as in all the others in the suite, testifies to the abundant use of printing which 
characterizes the firm. The labels are printed; the tags are printed; the 
blank books have printed headings, and the letters are printed, and only 
require to be filled up in the address and date. With this plan a most perfect 
system is attained ; nothing is trusted to chance, and when the ad- 
vertiser desires personally to find out whether his work has been well per- 



196 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

formed he is afforded every facility. There is no conceahneut ; no evasion. 

In dealing with publishers they have but one rule, and that is to make 
their agreement as explicit as possible. Nothing is left for memory or for 
chance. They pay precisely what they agree to, and do not desire to pay 
less. Their books are so kept that any account can be very quickly verified, 
and no claim which is just is presented to them which is not instantly paid. 
They send out their copy in printed form, and their agreement with the 
publisher is also printed, and no man can claim that his contract was 
ambiguous. Still, while executing their part with exactness and stipulating 
for the same from others, they do not snap up every technical objection to 
save themselves from paying out money. They have, in this respect, among 
the trade, a very high reputation, and a mere informality will not vitiate an 
account. All moneys are paid out in checks, excepting the salaries of those 
in the oflSce, of whom there are some thirty, or more, and the number of 
checks drawn by this house on the Broadway Bank, one of the largest in 
the city, and where the city accounts are kept, is greater than that of any 
other depositor. It has been found necessary in practice to pay by checks, 
for many publishers will not forward receipts, and by sending a check this 
difficulty is obviated. It must be endorsed before the money can be obtamed. 

What becomes of all the papers ? We are sorry to say that they go to 
the paper manufacturer at last. It is only in this or in similar establishments 
that anything like a full representation of the press of the United States can 
be found. Every little while a cart is backed up to the pavement and filled 
with paper for the mill. The sales for this purpose afford just aboiit enough 
money to pay for their postage — some fifteen hundred dollars a year. 

One of the ideas originated by this firm was that of lists of newspapers. 
It commenced with the New England newspapers, with whom a contract was 
made for a definite space yearly, they taking the risk of filling up the columns. 
They were enabled to offer them so low to the merchants of Boston and 
New York that they succeeded immediately in their design, and they 
extended the idea, and now control space, by means of these special con- 
tracts, with twenty-five hundred newspapers, being fully one-half of all which 
are published in the Union. Although this comprises but a small portion 
of their business, yet it is the part by which they have been most widely 
known, and about which most has been talked. The country editor re- 
ceives pay for those columns which he could not otherwise sell, and the 
advertiser secures insertion at extremely low rales. 

Besides their advertising agency, they transact a large amount of busi- 
ness in printers' materials, types, presses, inks, and so on, and own several 
j>atents relating to the art — among others, one for printing two, three, or 
more colors from one form without raising the type by underlays. A 
stereotype can be used, and the work can be done on any ordinary press 
In connection with their business they have published the Advertiser's 
Gazette, a periodical full of information to advertisers and the news- 
paper trade. It is a lively, sparkling journal, and is the only one of 
its kind in America, and has only one rival in the world. The newspaper 
press in this country has here a trade organ, and has well availed itself of 
it. Yearly, too, the firm publishes the Newspaper Directory, the most 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 197 

perfect and elaborate work of the kind ever issued. It has been formed 
by actual correspondence with nearly six thousand periodicals, Every 
newspaper is registered, with its size, price, form, and politics; the 
date of its establishment is given, as also the name of its editor and pro- 
prietor, and its circulation. A gazetteer of all the towns in the United 
States where a newspaper is published accompanies this. No one can 
estimate the value which such a Directory as this is to the great world of 
advertisers and newspapers. 

Finally, in concluding the account of this establishment, we need only 
refer to the uniform success of George P. Eowell & Co. Understanding 
their occupation, and paying attention to it and it only, they have built up 
a large business in a comparatively short space of time, exceeding the 
progress of any previous agency, and destined to grow in the future still 
more rapidly than in the past. This is the fruit of care, of uniform courtesy, 
and of a willingness to oblige which retains them business, while their 
unequaled facilities enable them to ofter the very best terms that can be 
given to advertisers. 



Among the agricultural dealers of the country few are better known 
than R. H. Allen & Co., who have, by long experience, thoroughly mastered 
their business. In reply to an interrogatory addressed to them a few days 
ago, they remarked : " We can only say in reply that though we are per- 
haps unable to specify from which particular medium we have derived most 
benefit, we knmo that when we discontinue advertising our business dimin- 
ishes, and can be brought up again only by a renewal of liberal advertising." 



Prof. Alonzo Flack, of the Claverack Institute, thus gives his ideas as 
to the value of advertising : " I have for twenty years advertised my school 
for from one thousand to fifteen hundred dollars per year, and have always 
found it to pay, My school is a pecuniary success, while most schools that 
do not charge over $300 per year, including all extras, have not succeeded 
pecuniarily. I attribute it to my uniformly keeping full school by adver- 
tising largely." 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS. 



The man who refuses to patronize the newspaper is the man of morbid 
disposition, of small ideas and no business talent. His light, if he has 
any, is so completely concealed beneath the bushel of self that it will never 
burn to any practical purpose, and may be extinguished without a single 
sigh from the world around. Such a person is known by his works. A 
spirit of liberality and benevolence never animates him, but he lives on, 
wondering at the success of others and bewailing his OM'n hard lot. 

The newspaper is to the individual what hearing is to the blind. It 
teaches him better than anything else what is going on around, puts him in 
communication with neighboring countries and nations, gives the earliest 
details of commercial and political news, and tends in the greatest degree 
to true intellectual development. It has a spirit of universality found 
nowhere else; self is forgotten in the more important events daily chronicled, 
and we are shortly led to consider ourselves only as parts of the great whole 
which go to make up the grand result. 

Take from us the press, and we should immediately fall back to a level 
with those who lived in the ages of ignorance and despotism. 'Tis only 
through this agency that we are better than they and enjoy liberties and 
privileges of which they never dreamed. Books have their value and merits, 
both of the first order and of undeniable importance, yet, as a power, the 
newspaper surpasses them all. It goes everywhere, is read by everyone, 
and makes up the ])ublic opinion of the day. Without it we should be lost. 
Business would come to a stand-still, markets be unsteady; stocks unobtain- 
able at any fixed value, and everything else uncertain and fluctuating. To 
say nothing of its importance in instituting and sustaining a correct literary 
taste and healthful sentiment, coninierce is dependent in a great measure 
entirely u))on these daily ])ublioations. They give impetus to trade, steadiness 
to the markets, and an increased activity to all business transactions. We 
daily examine the columns of the morning paper for the prices current if we 
have anything to })uy or sell, carefully peruse the various commercial reports, 
and act upon the facts thus obtained. Nor is this all, we look here for some- 
thing more. We expect to find, besides all the matter above enumerated, 
intelligencte which shall direct us where to make our purchases and Avhom to 
buy of. Indeed, at tlie present day, this last idea has been reduced to such 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 



a system that no man, be he ever so shrewd and intellicrent, can hope to 
succeed m any avocation without thoroughly and energetically advertising 
his business through the newspaper. Only thus can he place himself and his 
firm before the public in a right light ; and only thus can he be sure of even 
moderate success. By such a course an acquaintance is formed and a name 
established, customers are found, and business made on the surest and safest 
foundation possible to build upon. 

The importance of advertising is undisputed and universally admitted. 
The extent to which it is carried proves, beyond doubt, its usefulness and 
advantages. The man who advertises once is sure to do so again, and from 
each outlay in this direction he reaps more and greater advantages. It 
opens the most direct road to success and offers equal inducements to all 
parties. A glance at any of our papers will show at once the fact that those 
who avail themselves most of this system are from the highest rank in 
business life, whose position and standing is obtained only through merit 
and experience; and this position they owe in a great measure toll steady 
exercise of the course we have pointed out. 

One to be known must keep his name before the people. He must let 
them know where he is, what he is, and what he is doing. If not, the people 
will never take the trouble to hunt him up, since they can always' find plenty 
of others who willingly and cheerfully advertise them of their movements 
and operations, and who consequently receive the custom thus diverted from 
other channels. One might as well establish himself in the very depths 
of an African desert and expect to enter immediately upon a profitable 
business as to start in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, or any other city 
with the same idea, unless he resort to some means of advertising. It is 
true, all do advertise in a certain degree, but if the sign and show-card are 
successful m attracting patrons, so much the more so would be an attractive 
notice in the columns of the newspaper. It is then not only the passers-by 
who read, but thousands beside, who never would think of gazino- into a 
shop window for what they desire. The paper reaches a class that can be 
reached m no other way, and produces results to be arrived at by no other 
medium. 

What then can a business man do more advantageously than to freely 
avail himself of the door thus thrown open to all, and place before the world 
his goods and his merchandise. The world will then see it, read of it, and 
govern itself accordingly; a fair trial will be awarded by the public- a 
generous share of patronage will follow, and unless he be a humbug or 'an 
impostor his goods will sell, his merchandise will find customers and a 
steady mcrease of profits follow as the certain result. The unbelieving may 
doubt this. It is only because he has never tried the experiment; let him 
once do that, and all his doubts will vanish and he become a firm believer in 
this method. The man who invests his money, saved from trade, in Govern- 
ment bonds, bank stocks, or other securities, thinks the per cent, realized 
therefrom yields a handsome revenue, and so it does; but the same money 
devoted to advertising his goods or merchandise, his business or profession 
would yield a per cent infinitely in advance of that attainable in any other 
way. The revenue derived trom expending a few dollars in putting- one's 



2C0 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

self before the people in a correct light cannot be set down at any market 
value, but may be regarded as infinite. This we know to be a fact, and it 
is proved beyond dispute by the example of all live, energetic business men 
of the day. The importance of adopting this measure cannot be over 
estimated. In fact it is almost synonymous with success, and in nearly 
every instance it will prove a forerunner thereof. 

Our readers, if they never have tried the experiment, can do no better 
than to try it now ; adopt this course at once and you never will regret the 
step thus taken. No matter W'hat your business is — no matter what your 
calling. If you want to secure customers, patrons, patients, or clients, the 
quickest, surest, safest, and most satisfactory way is to advertise. 



The Art of Adyertisixg. — An advertiser who knows his business ex- 
pends his money freely but judiciously. He knows that he must catch the 
eye and secure the attention of purchasers if he would make the investment 
pay. To do this he must keep conspicuously and persistently before the 
public, and must make his advertisements fresh, attractive, and conveying in- 
formation. The readers must be taught to look at the advertising columns 
for fresh and interesting matter. Then, again, the judicious advertiser knows 
his best time. When business is brisk he advertises steadily, but when it be- 
comes dull he seeks, by conspicuous display of special inducements to pur- 
chasers, to stimulate it into activity. He reduces prices, and he enforces the 
fact upon the purchaser's attention by conspicuous announcements. When 
the timid advertiser withdraws he has the field to himself, and he diligently 
cultivates it. The most successful dry goods houses proceed on this system, 
and " dull times" only serve to make them set forth their inducements more 
distinctly. They have their reward, for to them '' dull times " only means a 
little less activity, if anything. 



ADRIANCE, PLATT & CO. 



The improvements in the art of farming since the time of Adam have 
been numberless. Man is continually trying to evade that curse which fore- 
told that by the sweat of his brow should he earn his bread, and all the forces 
of nature have been turned to account to lessen the burden. Winds drive 
mills ; the quick running streams of the civilized world turn water-wheels, 
and even the tides have been subjugated, so that their flux and reflux an- 
swers the same purpose as the steady currents of broad rivers. Agriculture 
felt these improvements last. It is within the memory of many men still 
living when Jethro Wood improved the plow by giving it a more shapely 
form and increasing its material strength by forming its blades and frames of 
solid iron. The sickle has hardly gone out of use ; the corn-sheller was 
twenty years ago a novelty, and the rude machinery of the Henrys and the 
Jameses was that used by Washington and Daniel Webster in their great 
farms at Mount Vernon and Marshfield. 

Farmers commonly will, if their opinion be taken, say that the reaping 
and mowing machines now commonly in use are perhaps the greatest aid they 
have received, especially in the late and present scarcity of help in the har- 
vest field. A farm which during four months of the year will require but 
two men, and seven months four men, would have required for the remainder 
of the season ten or twelve additional hands. Labor is scarce and high at 
this time, and the farmer is obliged to take anything that may offer. So, 
when the reaper was invented, and it was found that steel and iron would 
perform the labor in the fields which had before only been possible for men 
to do, it seemed a godsend. The business of supplying these machines im- 
mediately assumed gigantic proportions, and machinists at once began 
making improvements on the first crude attempts of the inventors. 

Among these machines the Buckeye has now a very high reputation. It 
was first brought prominently before the public at the Great National Field 
Trial of the United States Agricultural Society, held at Syracuse in 1857. 
The novel principles introduced in it were so great an advance on all previous 
inventions that it at once commanded the attention and admiration of those 
interested in agricultural progress. Its success at this trial was complete. 
It distanced all competitors, and was awarded the first prize grand gold medal. 
Twenty-five Buckeye Mowers only were built in 1857, but the notoriety 
obtained at the Syracuse trial encouraged the manufacturers to build fifteen 
hundred for the next harvest. 



202 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

Despite the combined opposition of manufacturers of the old pattern, 
one-wheel, rigid-bar machines, who foresaw that the introduction of the 
Buckeye must drive them from the field, its fame spread rapidly throughout 
the country, and the manufacturers were able to fill but a small part of the 
orders which poured in upon them from all sections. Manufactories of the 
Buckeye were established in difierent parts of the country, and machines 
turned out in greatly increased quantities, but the demand still kept con- 
stantly in advance of the supply. 

Rival manufacturers, finding it impossible to sell their rigid-bar machines 
in competition with the Buckeye, were obliged to seek a foreign market for 
their old stock, and to get up new machines bearing some resemblance to the 
Buckeye, in order to make any sales at home. A few years completely revo- 
lutionized the mowing and reaping machine manufacture of the United 
States ; the Buckeye was accepted as the standard, and the measure of suc- 
cess which other machines met with was proportioned according to their re- 
semblance to the Buckeye model. 

In 1857 or 1858 the firm whose name heads our article commenced the 
mannfacture and sale of the Buckeye at Poughkeepsie, with salesroom in 
New York. The business has increased and enlarged in their hands mate- 
rially, and they have attained such excellence in the manufacture of their 
machines that a rival manufacturer, who exhibited at Syracuse a couple o^ 
years ago, says that there is a large variety of Buckeyes built in this country, 
diifering materially in quality and construction, and that " the award in Class 
I was made to the ' Buckeye ' of Adriance, Piatt & Co., who build much the 
best machine of that name." 

At this trial, which was held at Syracuse in 1866, and at which fifty-nine 
machines competed, the judges said : " For several years past every new 
mowing contrivance has gravitated more and more toward the Buckeye prin- 
ciple, until, as will be seen by an examination of the tables of dimensions, 
and the descriptions given in this report, all the machines are grouped aroimd 
this central type, only differing from each other by the introduction of diifer- 
ent mechanical equivalents for accomplishing the same purpose.'' 

This trial occupied about three weeks ; the tests were the severest and 
most comprehensive, and the trial was the most thorough and important ever 
held in any country. The first prize grand gold medal was awarded to the 
Buckeye machine for superiority in all the points selected by the judges as 
the essentin's of a perfect harvester. 

Many improvements have been added, and the works of the firm at 
Poughkeepsie have been constructed especially with reference to the better 
manufacture of the reapers. Twelve years have sufficed to extend the sale 
of the Buckeye from twenty-five machines to thirty thousand in a single 
season, and the number now in the United States is not less than one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand, while the demand has been so great that thousands 
of farmers who desire to obtain Buckeyes have been unable to do so. There 
is no prospect that this demand will cease in the future. The firm take all 
needful means of obtaining publicity, issuing circulars and advertisements in 
profusion, and doing work so tlioroughly tliat the future will but repeat the 
past. 



FAHNESTOCK, IIASLETT & SCHWARTZ. 



In the year 1829 Mr. B. A. Fahnestock, then quite a young man, located 
at Pittsburg, and embarked in the wholesale and retail drug business, which 
in a few years, owing to industry, enterprise, and thorough tact in conduct- 
ing business, assumed the position of the leading drug establishment of the 
city. In these days men's ideas of advertising were not developed to any 
considerable extent, but in so restless and ambitious a man as Fahnestock 
they were not destined to lie dormant, and, with plans well prepared, he 
commenced to use his resources in making known his wares to such an ex- 
traordinary extent that older and more modest houses readily predicted his 
ruin. 

The receipt for the manufacture of Fahnestock's Vermifuge was pur- 
chased shortly after the gentleman commenced business for an insignificant 
sum, it of course having no sale at that time worth speaking about; but once 
in his possession, by persistent effort, and by an expenditure in advertising 
that threatened to swamp him, he caused a brisk demand that has year by 
year rapidly increased and extended to every part of the globe. To-day this 
article is known and used throughout Europe, in the countries of South 
America, Cuba, Australia, and in every part of the United States and 
Canada. Annually over five thousand gross of vermifuge is forwarded to 
the empire of Brazil alone. This preparation, we are led to believe, has been 
of infinite service to mankind, for everywhere it is acknowledged a perfect 
specific for removing internal parasites. 

One of the specialties of this house is white lead, which has stood 
ground against all competition for upwards of forty years. This lead was 
originally branded B. A. Fahnestock & Co., under which title it enjoyed a 
lengthened popularity, which has increased under the recent brand of 
Fahnestock, Haslett & Schwartz. The purity of this article has given it a 
demand in the West that severely taxes the utmost capacity of supply. The 
present year will see the manufactory enlarged and improved to one of the 
finest in America. 

Before the melancholy death of Mr. B. A. Fahrenstock, which occurred 
upwards of a year ago, by the explosion of a steamboat on the Ohio river, 
branch houses had been established in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and 



204 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

in many of the fast-growing towns of the West, whose united sales run 
into the millions. 

This house is a living example of the reward offered to a mercantile 
career, judiciously conducted from the outset, a land-mark of Pittsburg, 
and a fair sample of the enormous business and prosperity which has grown 
up in that city of extensive establishments and solid wealth. The firm have 
ever looked to advertising as the great agent in success. They have have in 
the past had it illustrated over and over again. The profits that accrue from 
it are immense, and to it in the future they are most willing to trust. 



A STRIKING instance of the success of advertising is seen in Booth & Ries- 
ter, of Buffalo. Five years ago they started their works, while they were 
unknown outside of their city. By judicious advertising they have estab- 
lished their business on as good a footing as any in their line in this country. 
They employ from fifteen to twenty men, and have and are furnishing win- 
dows for churches in almost every State in the Union. 



T. R. Abbott, one of the persistent advertisers of the day, says : 
" Durmg the past year I expended over twenty thousand dollars advertising 
Dr. Burton's Antidote for Tobacco, that great remedy for smoking and chew- 
ing, and it has paid me handsomely. Parties having anything they want to 
sell speedily and to advantage, or who want to give publicity to their busi- 
ness, can do so by advertising freely.'' 



An enterprising firm gives the following testimony to the benefit of ad- 
vertising : ' Our experience is that advertising pays. We are constantly re- 
minded of this by our patrons in all i)arts of the United States and Canadas 
where we have advertised. B.vtciikldkr & Co., 

" Seed and Agricultural Dealers, Springfield, Mass." 



AUXILIARY PRINTING. 



Within a few years past there has sprung up a fashion among country 
newspaper publishers of purchasing their sheets, with one side ready printed, 
to which the terms Insides, Outsides, Exteriors, Interiors, Auxiliary Sheets, 
etc., are variously applied. Those who first printed on these sheets suffered 
the same martyrdom as the man who first carried an umbrella. Their con- 
temporaries accused them of hostility to local interests, of injuring the 
journeymen printers' trade, of degrading the editorial profession, of inability 
to edit their own paper without assistance, and of a spirit of small economy. 
Yet the plan grew in favor so that in less than nine years since the first 
"insides" were used, there are at this writing not less than five hundred 
country offices procuring one-half of their printing done by some wholesale 
auxiliary publishing house. Though comparatively few who use them 
have cared to publicly declare that fact, their very general use is the most 
convincing of all arguments as to their utility. It may be briefly stated, 
however, that by their use a saving is effected of about three fourths of the 
composition; one-half of the presswork, ink, and wear of type ; and a very 
large share of the editorial labor, thus enabling the home publisher to devote 
more time to local matters, politics, and finances. 

As early as 1850, this auxiliary printing was in vogue in England; and 
Cassell, the London publisher, in 1857, printed for about one hundred and 
fifty newspapers. There was also a solitary instance in this country in 1851 
in the case of the Staten Islander^ whose proprietors, Messrs. Hagandorn 
Bros., ordered their supplies of Moses Y. Beach, changing the name of their 
paper to the Staten Island Sun, to make the same " insides " available as 
were used on the New York Sun. Neither of these facts, however, seem to 
have produced any effect upon American country journalism. The particu- 
lar circumstance that gave birth to the current plan of Insides and Outsides 
is as follows : In July, 1861, Mr. A. N. Kellogg, the publisher of the Baraboo 
(Wis.) Republic, finding that in consequence of the enlistment of his 
patriotic "jours" he would be unable to issue a full sheet on the regular 
day, ordered of the Daily Journal office at Madison, the State Capital, half- 
sheet supplements printed on both sides wdth "war news" to fold with his 
own half-sheets. While mailing his edition it occurred to him that if the 
awkward fact of his paper being in two pieces could be obviated an excel- 



206 THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 

lent paper could bo regularly issued, and with a decided saving of labor and 
expense. His next supply of two printed pages was accordingly ordered to 
be struck off on one side of a fall sheet, instead of both sides of a half 
sheet, and on July 12, 1861, he issued the first sheet of the style which has 
since become so justly popular, and which Mr. Kellogg, with a pardonable 
partiality, regards as the greatest of all modern improvements in country 
newspaper printing. Mr. Kellogg, we may here remark, graduated at Co- 
lumbia College, New York city, in 1852, with distinction, but afterwards, as 
he says, finished his education in a country printing oflice, where his im- 
provements on the Newbury Card Press Avere also invented. 

In a few months the Brodhead (Wis.) Reporter^ published by L. 
W. Powell, Esq. (now managing editor of the Daily Republican at Chicago), 
followed suit, and at short intervals afterwards the Mauston Star^ published 
by John Turner, Esq., Columbus Journal, Richland Observer, and others. 
The insertion of State advertisements was a minor feature of this j^lan, but 
one well appreciated at the time. In January or February, 1862, T. L. 
Terry, Esq., editor of the Berlin Courant, conceived the idea of forming a 
publishers' association for the purpose of printing Inside sheets, and where a 
part or all of the matter could be set up expressly to meet the common 
wants of all the various ofiices. To carry out this plan a convention was 
called at Beaver Dam in March, 1862, but in consequence of a snow-blockade 
only four publishers were present, and the plan was abandoned. 

The proprietors of the Madison Journal, Messrs. Atwood & Rublee, 
continued to receive further orders until they printed for about thirty offices. 
The Milw^aukee Wisconsin, entering the business in 1864, drew off a 
large share of their orders, owing to their superior transportation facilities 
and the low prices effected by the practical carrying out of Mr. Terry's plan 
of advertising. They have steadily increased in the number of their orders, 
and at this time claim to supply about two hundred offices. 

In August, 1865, Mr. Kellogg, regarding himself as the real inventor of 
the system, took the field at Chicago, and soon found •' room in the front 
row," setting up all the type expressly for the papers, and determined to 
furnish the best sheets that money and skill could produce. The result has 
proved the correctness of his conception of the wants of coimtry pub- 
lishers. He now supplies over two hundred offices, numbering among them 
many of the leading Western weeklies, attracting by his superior and 
abundant reading matter the patronage of the best offices. Particular even 
to fastidiousness regarding everything that goes into his side of these 
papers, he now issues over thirty different styles of auxiliary sheets, embrac- 
ing almost every conceivable variety of size, politics, and style, and claims to 
print over half the numlicr of sheets now used by the j)atr()ns of this 
system. 

In the fall of 1866, Mr. G. E. Kimball, of the Belleville (111.) Adcocate, 
commenced the printing of Insides, and was a few months after the first to 
print Outsides also. In 1869, Mr. I. F. Guiwits, of the Franklin Printing 
Company, commenced the business at Middletown, New York, and now 
supplies a considerable number of Eastern papers. Various efforts to estab- 
lish themselves in this business have been made at different times by other 



THE MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 207 

parties without success. Eastern publishers, whose editions are large, and 
whose columns are already well filled with advertisements, look with less 
favor on the plan than the Western fraternity, but the philosophy of the 
plan of co-operative publication is so broadly based that it must in time 
prevail in all parts of the country. 

As fully one-half, on an average, of the matter furnished by local papers 
is of a general nature, and such as would be available for publication in other 
papers, it will be seen that an immense saving of composition, as well as a 
large increase in the average amount of reading given by the papers, would 
be the eifect of the " auxiliary " plan, under healthy management. But this 
is not all. The distracting duties of the country editor are apt to prevent 
as thorough work in any department as he would himself desire. It is easy 
to see, however, that the employment of an editorial force to select and 
compile the general matter expressly for a set of papers could hardly fail 
to produce a marked improvement in the character and arrangement of the 
department undertaken by them — that is, the general selections and com- 
pilations. 

At a cost in money eqiiivalent to only one or two hours of editorial 
labor weekly, and for an almost nominal charge for composition, the local 
publisher is by this plan furnished regularly and promptly with a large 
amount of well-printed general matter, far beyond his power to afford to 
his readers in any other way. 

The latest novelty in the business is that introduced by Mr. Kellogg, of 
supplying country papers with a set of sheets, containing, as a special 
feature, the successive parts of a serial story, and designed to increase their 
circulation a la Ledger. The first issues are of course scattered broadcast. 



The above article has been submitted to us for examination, and we can 
attest the substantial correctness of the statements therein made regarding 
the history of auxiliary printing. 

Hon. David Atwood, M. C, 

Pub. Madison (Wis.) Daily Journal. 
L. W. Powell, 

Managing Editor Chicago Dally R('puhKca7i. 
H. A. Reid, 

Assistant Editor Nebraska City Daily Press, 
formerly of Beaver Dam (Wis.) Citizen. 
T. L. Terry, 

Editor Berlin (Wis.) Courant. 
John Tukner, 

Editor Mauston (Wis.) Star. 



AMEEICAN 



NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK, 



CONTAINING 



Advertising Eates of Leading Newspapers, 



ARRANGED WITH AN INDEX FOR THE 
CONVENIENCE OF 



ADVERTISERS 



:N E W i' R K : 
GEO. P. ROWELL & CO., Newspaper Advertising Agents, No. 40 Park Row. 

1870. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by 

GEO. P. ROWELL & CO., 

In t>ie Clerk's Ofticc; of the District Court of the United States for the 
Soutliern District of Now York. 



INDEX 



ALABAMA. 

Ashland Times, Page 

CaiTolltoii, M'cst Alabamiaii, 
Claiborne, Monrou Kagle, 
Coluiiibiuna, siielli\' Co. (iuide, - 
Demoi)olis, Southein Kepublican, 

Elj-toii Ilei-alil, 

Eufaula News, 

Eutaw, Whiir unci Ob.,orv(a-, 
Greoiuille Advocate, 
Greeiivillt- South Alabauiian. 
Huntsvillc Advocate, 
Huntsvilli' Indcpeudfut, 
Moiitjjomeiy Advertiser, 
Montgomery, Alabama State Jonrnal 
Notasulga, Universalist Herald, - 
Oxford Kising Star, ... - 

Scottsboro, Industrial Herald, 

Selma Press, 

Selma Times and Messenger, - 
Stevenson New Era, . - - - 
Tallade^'a, Our Mountain Ibmic, - 
Tuscunibia, Clu-i.sthui H.-iiiM. - 
TuscunilMa, .North Ahilianiian and Ti: 
Tu!^kaloo.sa, Independent Monitor, 
AKKANSAS. 

Arkadelphia Tribune,. - 

Batesville, Noi-th Arkansas Times, 

Batesville Republican, .... 

Dardanelle Times, - - - - 

Devall's Blutr, White River Journal, 

De Witt Sentinel, .... 

Eldorado, Southron, .... 

Fort Smith New Era, 

Hamburg, Asldey County Times, 

Helena Clarion, " .... 

Helena, Vallej- Monitor, 

Hot Springs Courier, 

Little Rock, Republican, 

Little Rock, Arkansas Agricultural an( 

Median ieal Journal, - - - . 
Madison Free Press, 
Pocahontas, Uamlolph Expi'ess, - 
Searcy, White County Record, - 
Washington Post, .... 

CALIFORNIA 

Monitor, Alpine Miner, 

Nevada Transcript, .... 

Pacheco, Contra Costa Gazette, - 

San Francisco Hebrew, 

San Francisco, Irish News, 

San Francisco, L'Eco della Patria, 

Santa Barbara Press, 

Silver Jlountain, Alpine Chronicle. 

Snelling, San Joaquin Valley Argus 

Tuolumne City News, - 

Woodland, Yolo Mail, 

CONNECTICUT. 

Bridgeport Farmer, 
Bridgewater, Thompson's Monthly, 
Danhury, JetTersonian, - 
Danielsonville, Windham Co. Transcript 

Haitford Courant, 

Hartford, Evening Post, .... 
Hartford, General Advertiser, - 
Hartford, Soldiers' Record, 
Harttbnl, Tr.ivelcr.s' Journal, - 
Middletown, sentinel and Witness, 
Miditlelown, Tomahawk, 
New |[aven. College Courant, 
New Haven, Connecticut Repuhlikaner, 
New Haven, Loomis' Musical Journa^ 
New Haven, New Englander, 



CONNECTICUT. 

New Haven, Palladium, - - - Page 

Norwalk Gazette, 

Norwalk, Yankee Pedler, 

Norwich Morning Bulletin, .... 
South Coventry, Coventry Local Register, 



Southpo 
Statfonl 
We^st .Mc 
West M( 
West M. 
^\'e.st .Ml 
We.-stiioi 



t A 



ing.-^ T- Hand County Press, 
L-n .Journal-Recorder, 
■n. Literary Recorder, 
11, .Meriden Republican. 
■n. State Temperance Journal 
Ivertiser, .... 



WiiLsteil Herald, .... 
DELAWAUE. 

Dover, Delawarean, - . - - 
Dover, Baptist Visitor, - 
Miildlctown Transcript, - 
WilmiiiLrton, ComnnTcial, - 
\Vilniingtoii, Delaware (iazette, - 
Wilmington, Delawaie Tribune 

DISTRICT OF COLUJIliiA 

Georgetown, Coiirier, 
Washington, American Law Times 
"Washington, Civil Service Journal 
Washington, Star, - - - - 
Washington, Sunday Herald, - 
Washington, Sunday Morning Gazette 
Washington, Natioiial Republican, 

FLORIDA. 

Mariana Courier, 

Quiney Monitor, 

Tallahassee, Floridian, - - - - 
Tallahassee Sentinel, . - - - 
Tampa, Florida Peninsula, - 
Tampa, True Southerner, 

GEORGIA. 

Albany News, 

Auaericus Courier, .... 
-Vthens Farmer and Artizen, 
.Vthens, Sontheni Kaiiner. 
Atlanta, Gi'orgia Farm Journal, 
Atlanta, Methodist Advocate, 
Atlanta, Rural Southerner, 
Augusta, Banner of the South, 
Augusta, Southern Agriculturist, 

BainbriclETP Artrus, 

HarnesviTle, Weekly Gazette 
I'.rnnswick, Seaport Appeal. - 

Dawson Journal, 

Klberton Gazette, 

Fi>it (Taines. .Mirror, 

(iainesville. Air Line Eag'e, - 

Grillin, Middle (Jeorgian, .... 

Hawkinsville Dispatch, .... 

La Grange Reporter, 

Macon, American I'nion, 
Macon, Burke's Weekly for Boys and Girls 
Macon, Southern Cliristian .Vdvocate, 
;\[acon Southern Fai-m anil Home, 

Rome Courier, 

Rome Daily, 

Rome, Southerner and Commercial 

Rome Weekly, 

Savannah Morning News, 
Savannah, l!einil:)lican. 
Savannah, Soul hern .\griculturist, 
Sparta. So, uIktu Times and Plante: 
Thomson Southern Democrat, - 
Thomasvide, Southern Enterpriise. 
Valdosta, South Georgia Times, 
West Point Shield, . . - . 



460 

488 
418 
388 
G08 
479 
(108 
378 
378 
404 
404 
370 
2U0 

443 
308 
4!j2 
342 
372 
342 

oOtJ 
303 
405 
394 
547 



518 
3.50 
525 
271 
312 
376 

5.52 
516 
514 
4b2 
277 
541 
242 
474 
590 
518 
5U5 
380 
456 
342 
404 
490 
512 
.522 
422 
341 
293 
293 
293 
516 
585 



341 
.590 
400 
2S2 
350 
490 
;i42 



212 



AMERICAN NEWSrAPER RATE-BOOK. 



ILLINOIS. 
Aledo, DciiiDcnUic Banner, 
Amhov, r Coiintv Jounia;. 

Ii:llTv'(H)-..TV(T, ." - 

BiitiiVia Nfws, 

BelvidtTc, ((lurier, . - - - 

Benton Standanl, 

Blooniinjrli>n, Schoolmaister, - 
Blooniin.Lrtiin, Teiuperance Standard, 
B mktr Hill, Tnion Gazette, - 

B.ishncll Kcc.rd, 

Canil)rid,i,'c. Henry County Chi-onicle, 
C i:up I'oiiit Kntcrprise, ' - • - 
C mton, Fulton County Ledger, 
Carlinvillf Democrat," - - - - 

Carmi Coinicr, 

Carrolltoii (iu/^clte, .... 

Contralia Democrat, . . - - 

Ceatralia M'ntiufd, 

Cliebanse Herald, .... 

Clienoa Times, 

Chester, Valley Clarion, - - - 

Chicago Advance, 

Chicago, American Builder, - 
Chicago American Churchman, - 
Chicago Art Journal, ... 

Chicago Bi-ight Siile, .... 
Chicago, Bureau, .... 

Chicago, Christian Freeman, 
Cnicago Chronicle, .... 
Chicago Commercial Bulletin, 
Chicago Freemail, .... 
Chicago Hemhmdet, .... 
Chicago, Home Circle and Temper 

Oracle, 

Chicago, Illinois Volks-Zeitung, - 
Chicago Independent, . . . - 
Chicago Journal, .... 
Chicago Land Owner, . . - - 
Chicago Legal News, - - . - 

Chicago, Liberal, 

Chicago, Little Corporal, 
Chicago, Lj'ceum Banner, - 
Chicago, Mant'f)rd's .Magazine, 
Chicago, Museum and Hotel Register, 
Chicago, Miisieal Independent, 
Chicago, Nat ioual I'rohilntionist, 
Chicago, Nalional Sunday->ehool Teac 
Chicago, New Covenant, - 
Chicago, North-western Cliristian Adv 

Chicago, I'c.st, 

Chieaf,'o, I'raiiie Farmer, 
Chicago I'riee Current, - 
Chicago, I'rogramme, .... 
Chicago, Ueligio-Physiological Jonrna 
Chicago Republican", .... 
Chicago, Sandebudet, .... 
Chicago Skandinaveu, 

Chicago, Standard, 

Chicago, Svenska Amerikanaren, - 

Chicago Times, 

Chicago Tribune, .... 

Chicago Union, 

Chicago, Voice of Masonry, 
Chicago, Western Bookseller, 
Chicago Western Catholic, - 
Chicago, Western Monthly, - 
Chicago, Western Kural, - 
Chicago, Wisicrn Soldiers' Friend. - 
Chicau'o, \Vorkini,'in;m's Advocate, 
Clinton, DeWitt l.-e-ister, - 
Danvill<' Coiiinienial, 

Decatur I>eirin( rat. 

DeKall), DeKalli Countv News, 
Di.xou. Tele^'rapli and Herald, - 
Dundee Standard, .... 
Edwanlsville llepubliean, - 
j:igin Watchman, .... 

Fairlield Democrat, .... 

Fairtleld, Wayne County I'ress, 
Fairmount Ifepuhlican, .... 
Forn-ston .Journal, .... 

Frceport News, 

Gahina Gazette, 

Galena Sun, 

Galesburg Free Press, 

Galesburg Liberal, 

Galesburg Re ister, - - . - 
Geni^'a, Kane County Republican, • 
Gilman, Fruit (Jrower, ... 
GrayviUe, independent. 



.-.K) 
3t-2 

.5:58 

•278 
;)40 
48!) 
507 
.i'iO 



ILLINOIS. 

Ilarrisburg Chronicle, 
Harvard ludeiiendent, - 
Henrv Republican, - 
Homer. Journal, .... 
Jacksonville Indepi'udent, • 
Kankiikee Times, .... 
Lanark Carroll Cou itv (iazette, 
Lebanon Journal. - " - 

Lena Star, 

Lewistown Union, .... 
Lexington Courier, 
I.itcbtield .Monitor. 
I,.ini-ville Ledger, 

.M;iii<.ii, Flag, " 

Maroii l'ril)une, .... 

.Masi.u Citv News, - . - . 

.Mattoon, Radical Republican. 

.Metauiora, Woodford Sentinel, - 

Metropolis, Western Star. 

Moiiiso:! Re'orm Investigator, - 

.Mound Citv.Jourual, - 

.Mount ( arniel Democrat, 

.Mount ( arroll, Carroll Countv Mirror, 

Mount Carroll. Dread, • 

.Mount Sterling (iazette, - 

:Mount N'ernon Free Press. - 

Nashville, People's Press, 

New .\thens Lra, .... 

New Boston Herald, 

Oregon. National Guard, 

Paris, Waliash \allev Times, 

Peoria Demokrat, ... - 

Peoria, National Democrat. - 

Petersbui-g, Republican, 

Pbilo Herald, .... 

Polo. ( ),_,de County Press, 

Pontiae, Livingston Democrat, 

Pontiac. Sentinel and Press, 

Prarie City ( iazette, - • - 

I'rinceton, Bureau County Repabl 

Quincy Herald, ..-".. 

Quincv'Tril)Ul'ie', 

(,)uincy Wliiu' and Republican, - 
Robin'scm, Crawford Countv Argus, 
Rockfonl (;a/.etto, .... 
Rock Island Union, .... 
Rushville, seluiyler Citizen 
R-ishville Time.i, .... 

Salem. Marion Count\ Republican, 
Sandwicli (ia/.ette, .... 
Shannon (Jazette, .... 
Shawneetown Mercury, - 
siielb\ville Shelby County Union, 

sidne'v S(>ntinel, 

Sparta, Randolph Plaindealer, - 
SpriugtieM, Illinois Atlas, 
Springtield. Illinois Staats-Diunokra 
Sprinu'field. Illinois State .Journal, 
Spriuglield. Illinois State Kegister, 
Sterling, Whiteside Chronicle, 
Sullivan Progress, - - - - 
Tavlorville Flag, .... 

Thomson Courier, .... 

Tolono Citizen, 

Vermont Herald, . . • - 

Vienna, .\rlerv, 

Warren Sentinel, .... 
Watseka, Irorpiois Republican, 
Waukeegan (iazette, 
Waverlv(;azette, .... 

Wheaton, Northern Illinoian, - 
Winchester Times, .... 
Wyoming Chi. 'f, .... 
Yorkvill.', Kemlall County Heeord, 
IMM.VNA. 

Anderson, Plain Dealer, 

.Vuburn Times, 

.^ui'ora, Dearborn Independent, 
Bloomington Progress, - 
Blutrton Chroni<'le, 
Brazil. Manufacturer and Miner, - 
Cambridge Citv Tribune, . 
Center Point. Sunbeam. - 
Coi-ydon Deiaocrat, 
Corydon Republican, 
<'oviugton .Journal, 
Covington. People's Friend, - 
Kdinburg. Watclnnan, - 
Evansville Journal, .... 



P,.,je 4 2 
49iJ 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



213 



IXIHAXA. 

Kvans\ill(> Union, 

Fort -Wavnc Dcinociat, . . . . 
Fort Wayne Juuinal, - . . . 

Frankfort Crescent. 

Franklin Jert'ersoiiian, - - - . 

Goslieu Times, 

Grecntiold Commercial, 

Hiinover Era, 

Hartford City Democrat, 
Huntin;;ton,'ln(liaiia Herald, - 
Indianapolis, American Ilousewi e. - 
Indianopolis, Ndrtli-westcrn Fainier, - 
Indianapolis, Phonic Advocate, 

Jasper, Courier, 

Kendallville, Commercial Advertiser. 
Kendallville Standard, .... 
Kendallville. Temperance Magazine, 
Kokomo, Howard Tribune, 
Lafayette, hnliana Tiade (iazette, - 

Lafayette Journal, 

Laporte, Xew Church Independent, - 
Lawrenceburgh, Democratic Regis er. 

Madison Courier, 

Madison Free Press, 

Marion, Chronicle, 

Marion, Mississinewa Monitoi-, 
MartinsNille, Morgan County Gazette, 
Mishawaka Enterprise, - " - 

Muncie Times, 

Xew Albany Commercial, 
Newburgh Recorder, .... 
Newport, Hoosier State. .... 
Noblesville, Hamilton County Register. 
North Vernon Plain Dealer, - 
Oxford, Benton Tribune, 
Peru, Jliami County Sentinel, 
Petersburg]!, Republican Press, - 

Plymouth Democrat, 

Portland, Jay and Adams Reiniblican, 
Richmond, Indiana Radical, - 
Rushville Republican, - - . . 
Salem, Washington Democrat. 
Shelbyville, Shelby Democrat, - 
Shelbyville, Shelby National Volunteer, 
Terre Haute, Saturday Evening Gazette, 

Tipton Times, 

Vincennes, Gazette, 

Wabash Republican, .... 
Waterloo City, Air Line, - . - . 
Waterloo City, Union Advertiser. 

Winamac Denaocrat, 

Winchester Journal, .... 

IOWA. 

Adel, Dallas Gazette, - . . . 
Algona, Upper Des Moines, - - - 

Ames Intelligencer, 

Bloonifleld, Davis County Rei)nbl can. 
Burlington, Gazette and "Argus, 
Burlington HawkEye, . . . . , 
Carroll, Western Herald, .... 
Cedar Rapids. Linn County Signal, - 
Chariton Patriot, .-■... 
Clarinda, Page County Democrat . - 
Corning, Adams County Gazette - 

Council Bluffs Bugle, 

Cresco, Iowa Plain Dealer, 

Dakota City, Humboldt County Indeiiendt 

Davenport Gazette, 

Davenport, Journal, 

Davenport. Kniignint's Guide, 
Decorab, lieirisier and Ventilator. - 

Des Moines Bulletin, 

Des Moines, lon^a Homestead, . 
Des Moines, Iowa School Journal, 
Des Moines, Iowa State Register, 
Des Moines, Statesman, .. . . . 
Des Moines, Western Jui-ist, 

DeWitt, Observer, 

Dubuque, Iowa Staats-Zeitung, - 
Dubuque National Demokrat. 

Dubuque Times, 

EarlvilleSun, 

Edgeville Advertiser, 

Eddyville, Des Moines Valley (iazette, 

Eldora Ledger. 

Elkada. Der Nord Iowa Herahl, . 
Fairfield, Iowa Democrat, .... 

Glenwood Opinion, 

Hampton, Franklin Reportei-. 
Hampton, Free Press, .... 



IOWA. 

le -JKi Independence, Conservative, - - Pi 

- J.'iS Iowa City Republican, .... 

•-'ill Jelfersou Era, 

■ 5-24 Kno.xville, Iowa Voter, - . - . 
342 Lansing .Mirror, ' - 

■ .'lU!) Leon, Decatur County Journal, 

:i7(; Marshalltown. Marshall County Advance. 

• SOS .Mount Vernon, Hawk Eye, .' . 

•2':o .Muscatine Courier, ...... 

274 -Nashua Po.st, 

:«Hi Xcwton, Jasper Republican. 

3(11) oriord. Tama County Leailer, 

308 ottuniwa, Copperhead, 

r)OU ottuniwa Courier, 

370 Pel I a Blade, . - - . 

492 Prairie City Gleaner and Herald. - 

4(J4 Red Oak Junction, Montgomery Express, 

442 Sidney American Union. .... 

.3.19 Sigourney, Western Stock Journal, 

420 .strawberry I>oint Press, .... 

301; Vinton, I'coiile's Journal, 

.534 \\ atcrloo, Iowa State Reporter, - 

4.")ii Waukon Standard, 

276 West Union, Fayette County Union. 

284 ^Vest Union, Republican Gazette, - 

342 Winterset Madisonian, 

4'.28 i KANSAS. 

440 Alma, Wabaunsee County Herald, 

%X% .Vtchison, Kansas Patriot, .... 

.5,18 .Vtchison, Real Estate Index, - 

380 IJa.xter Springs, Cherokee Sentinel, - 

514 Erie, Neosho County Dispatch, 

322 Eureka Herald, 

39(; Fort Scott, Monitor, 

227 <;irard Press, 

.527 Garnett, Plain Dealer, .... 

498 Holton. Jackson County News, - 

4!:>2 Hnniboldt Union, ..... 

."^2 Leavtuiworth, Kiinsas Farmer, - 

0.52 Louisville, I'ottawatomie Gazette, 

,532 Manhattan Homestead, .... 

314 ; Manhattan Standard, . . . . , 

414 Neosho Falls, Frontier Democrat, 

.534 I Oskaloosa, Independent, . . . . 

242 Oskaloosa, Kansas Statesman, - 

342 Salina, Herald, 

484 Seneca, Nemaha Courier, .... 

.504 Topeka, Kansas State Record, 

.58-2 KE.NTrCKY. 

360 Carlisle, Mercury, 

492 Caverna, Hart County Messenger 

,360 I Columbus, Dispatch, 

i Covington Journal, 

474 Cviithiana News, 

290 Franklin Sentinel, 

.522 Glasgow Times, 

604 ; Hemlerson News, 

518 I Lexington, Apostolic Times, - . . . 

518 I Lexington, Farmers' Home Journal, 

376 I Lexington, Kentucky Statesman, 

.352 Lexington Observer and Reporter, . 

512 I Louisville, Catholic Advocate, 

342 I Louisville, Christian Observer and Free 



• 342 

518 

- 54'i 
lit, 400 

- 416 
585 

- 600 
520 

- 530 
518 

■ 470 
597 

- 3f-8 
470 

- 532 



Christian Commonwealth. 
)uis\illc Courier- Journal. 
)uis\ ille, Medical Journal, 
.uisville. Western Ruralist, • 
Idican, - 
stitutionalist. ■ 
ithern Shield, 
ickian, 



Louis' 
Louisi 
Mavsv 
Newca 
Owen>- 
Paduc 
Rns-.-l 



Journal, 



■at, 



Wincliester, Clark County Democrat, 

LOUISIANA. 

Baton Rouge Courier, .... 
482 i Carrollton, Rei)nblican Standard, 
442 P:dgard, Reiiublican Picnieer, 
494 Hou'ua, TerriO)onne Patriot, 

2.38 Natchitoches Times. 

512 New Orleans Standard, .... 

518 Pointe a la Hache, Empire Parish, 

227 Rayville, Richland Beacon, 

428 St. Francisville, Feliciana Republican, 

512 MAINK. 

.504 Augusta, Gospel Banner, .... 
442 Augusta. Monitor and Patent .Vdvertiser, 
442 Bangor Whig and Courier, .... 



at 474 

- 5t-2 
•544 

- 342 
520 

- 497 
474 

- 490 
474 

- 530 
540 

- 346 
474 

- 484 
'266 

- 446 
490 
227 

- 460 
546 

- 536 
587 

- 594 
500 



310 
326 
354 
456 
28(i 
274 
511 
500 
536 
498 
.536 
•231 
.5(,7 
412 
491 
292 
390 
536 
378 
2t(2 
395 

474 
322 

5116 
•258 
390 
496 
303 
500 
414 
.526 



490 
302 
292 
474 
383 
414 
428 
308 
356 



280 
378 
346 
288 
464 



2(!2 

384 
454 

402 
.?96 



314 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



MAIXK. 

Belfiist. Kcimblican Journal. - - I'tiyf 

Bniiiswii k ■l(lrf,'rai)li, 

Cam. Ion Herald, 

Ellsworth AnK-rican, 

Gardiner, Home Journal, .... 
Gardiner, Kennebec Iteporter, - 

Maehlas Republican, 

Mechanics Kails, Androscogfjiii Herald, - 
North Anson, I'nlon Advocate, - 

Portland Advertiser, 

Portland, Maine Journal of Education, 

Portlan.l I'los, 

Portland, Transcript, 

Presque l~l.-, -^unri.se, 

Rockland, Town Talk, .... 
Sherman Mills, Voice, .... 
Wiscasset, Seaside Oracle, 

MARYLASU 

Baltimore, Accountant ami Advertiser, 
Baltimore, .\inerican Farmer, 



Baltimon 
Baltimore 
Bultimor( 
Comp: 
Baltiinort 
Baltimort 



Cathi 
Mar\ 
Kun 



Mirror, .... 

il Farmer, 

ientlemau and Ladies 



■Saturday Night, .... 

southern Review,, 

Baltimore .Statesman, 

Baltimore, Sunday Telegram, 
Bel Air ^^gis and"lntelligencer, - 

Bel Air Record, 

Boonsboro, Odd Fellow, .... 
Cambridge, Democrat and Herald. 

Centerville Observer, 

Cumberland, Civilian and Telegraph, 
Cumberland, Mountain City Times, - 
Cumberland Transcript, .'--.- 
Elkton, Cecil Democrat, .... 

EllicottCity Times, 

Hagerstown, Mai-yland Free Press, - 
Havre de Grace, Havre Republican, - 
Libertytown, Bannerof Liberty, 
Snow Hill, Democratic iMessenger, 
Snow Hill, Worcester County .•Shield, 
St. Michaels, Comet and .VdVertiser, - 
Towsontown, Baltimore County Union, 
Upper Marlborough, Prince Georgian, 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Atliol, Worcester West Chronicle, 

Barnstable Patriot, 

Barre Gazette, ....... 

Boston, American Miscellanv, - 
Boston, American Railway Times, 
Boston, American T'nion, .... 

Boston, Ain<'ri(an Workman, 
Boston. lialluu'.. Monthly .Magazine, 
Boston, Cliristian i;ei,nster, . . . . 

Bo.ston, Commercial Bulletin, - 

Boston Courier, 

Bo.-ton, Flag ot" our Union. .... 

Boston Folio, 

Bo.ston, Good Health, 

Boston, •(Jood Templar, 

Boston, (iray's New Enghuid Heal Estate 

Journal, 

r.oston Herald, 

15os!on, Hhistrated Police K'ws. - 

Boston Investigator, 

Boston Journal, 

Boston, Littell's Living Age, 

Boston, Masonic Monthly, .... 

Boston, Mas^aclinsetls IMoughman, - 

Boston, Medieal and Surgical Journal, 

Boston. National Chronicle, 

Boston, New Lngland Farmer, 

Boston, New Kngland Postal Itecord, 

Boston News, 

Boston, Novelette, 

Bo.ston, Pilot 

Boston Shi))iiing List, 

Boston, S, oiling' Times, . . . . 

Boston, standard ISearer. .... 
Boston, Student and Schoohnute, 

Boston Tinii'^, 

Boston Traveller, 

Boston, \Val(hnian and Rcflecioi- 
Boston, ^'ontlis' Com))anion, 
Boston, /ion's Herald, - 

Cainl.ridi,'.' Press, 

Clinton Conrant, 

East Uoston Advocate, ... 



, M.\SS.\CHCSETTS. 

: East Douglas, Douglas Herald, - - Page 

Edgartown, Vineyard Gazette, 

Fall River, Monitor, 

] Fitchburg Reveille, ...... 

; Gloucester, Perley's Trades Gazette, 
I Haverhill Gazette, 

Hingham Journal and South Shore .\dvc 
tiser, 

Lawrence American, .... 

Lawrence Sentinel, .... 

Lowell, Citizen and News, . 



Hi 



d W 



.Midd|et,orougli(;a/,ette, .... 

New IJcdford. Standard, .... 
New r.eiltord, Whalemen's Shijiping List, 
Nortlianipton Free Press, 
I'rovineetown Advocate, . . . - 
Randolph, Norfolk County Register, - 
Salem, American Naturalist, 
Salem, Peabody's Fireside Favorite, - 
Sanrtwicli, Cape Cod Gazette, 
Southbridge Journal, .... 
Springfield, New England Homestead, - 

Taunton Gazette, 

Wakefield Banner, 

Walt ham Free Press, .... 

Waltham Sentinel, 

Warehani News, 

Westfleld News Letter, 

Westfield, Western Hampden Times, - 

Weymouth Gazette, 

Worcester Gazette, 

Worcester, L'Etendard National, 
Yarmoutli Port, Yarmouth Register, - 

.MICHIG.4.X. 

Adrian Times and Expositor, 

Adrian Journal, 

Albion Mirror, 

Albion Iteconler, 

Allegan .Journal, 

Ann .\rl)or, Michigan Aigus, - 

Ann Arbor. Courier. 

Battle( reek, Health Reformer, - 
Benton Harbor Palladium, .... 
Broii-on Herald, . . . - • 

Ruchanan, P.erien C(umty Record, - 
Caro, Tuscalo .Vdvcrti.ser, 
Cassoiiolis, National Democrat, 
Cenireville St. Joseph County Republican 

Charlevoix Sentinel, 

CoUhvater Sentinel, 

Decatur, Van Buren County Republican, 
Detroit, Abend-Post, - ' - 
Detroit Adverti-er an<l Tribune, 
Detroit Coninieicial .Vdvertiser, 
Detr<iit Journal of Commerce, 
Detroit, .Michigan Farmer, . - . - 
Detroit. Michigan Volksblatt, 
Detroit. Peninsular Herald, - 

Detroit liiion, 

Detroit, Western Catholic, ... - 
Detroit, Western Rural, . - - . 
Fast Saginaw, Saginaw Enteri)rise, - 
Flint, (iencsee Democrat, ... 

Flint. Wolverine Citizen, .... 
Grand Haven Herald, .... 
Grand Rapi Is, Industrial Jo\iriial. - 
Grand Hapids, Labor I'nion, - 

(;rand UapidsSun, 

Hart. Oceana ((unity Journal, 

HastiuLis Home Journal, .... 

Holland, De Hollander, .... 

Hollv ite-ister, 

Ionia, Ionia Sentinel. .... 
Ithaca, (iratiot Journal, .... 
Jonesville Iudei)cinlent, - . - - 

Kalamazoo (Jazette, 

Kalannizoo, lUll l\)ster, .... 

Lawton Tiibunc, 

Leslie Herald, 

Lexington, Sanilac Jeircr-onian. 
Luilingtoii. .Mason County Record. 
Manchester Kideri>rise, .... 

Manistee Times, 

Marshall, Deinoeratic E.\i)onndcr, - 

Marshall Statesman, 

' Mason, Ingham Conidv News, 

Monroe Commercial, 

Mount Pleasant, Isabella (oniity Lnterprisi 
Muskegon Eaterprise. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



215 



MICHIGAN. 

Muskeson News and Reporter, 
Niles Democrat, - . . . 
North Lansing, Lansing Enterprise, 
Ontonagon, Lake Superior Miner, 
Otsego, Allegan County Recoril, - 
Otsego, Business Index, 

Ovid Register, 

Parma, Public Advertiser, - 

Pentwater, Oceana Times, 

Pontiac Bill Poster, 

Pontiac Gazette, .... 

Pontiac Jacksonian, 

Port Huron Commercial, - 

Port Huron Times, .... 

Portland Advertiser, 

Quincy Times, 

St. Clair Republican, - - - - 
St. Louis, Michigan State Advance, 
Schoolcraft Dispatch, 
Spring Lake Independent, - 
Stanton, Montcalm Herald, 
Sturgis Journal, .... 
Tawas City, Iosco County Gazette, 
Three Rivers Reporter, - 
Traverse City, Grand Traverse Hera 
Vassar, Tuscola County Pioneer, 

MINNESOTA. 

Anoca, Anoca County Press, - 
Austin Democrat, -" . . . 
Austin, Mower County Transcript, 
Blue Earth City, Minnesota South-T 
Claska Valley Herald, - 
Faribault, Central Republican, 
Garden City Herald, - - 
Glencoe Register, - . . . 
Kasson, Dodge County Republican, 
Lanesboro Herald, .... 
Mankato Union, .... 
Mantorville Express, 
Minneapolis, Farmertidende, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota Pupil, 
Minneapolis, Nordisk Folkeblad, 
Minneapolis Tribune, 
Red Wing Argus, . . . . . 
Rochester, Federal Union, 
St. Cloud Journal, • - . - . 
St. Paul Dispatch, - - - . 
St. Paul, Minnesota Tidning, 
St. Peter Advertiser, . - - . 

St. Peter Tribune, 

Sauk Center Herald, .... 
Sauk Rapids Sentinel, . - . . 

Wells Atlas, 

Winona Herald. 

Winona North Star, - - . . 
Winnebago City, Free Homestead. . 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Abei-deen Examiner, . . - . 
Brandon Republican, 

Canton Mail, 

Columbus Democrat, 

Forest Register, 

Friars Point, Delta, .... 

Grenada Sentinel, 

Holly Spring, Conservative, - 
Jackson, Mississippi Pilot, - 

Macon Beacon, 

Mead ville, Franklin Journal, 
Meridian Gazette, .... 

Natchez Courier, 

Natchez Democrat, - . . . 
Natchez, New South, - . . . 
Okalona, Prairie News, 

Oxford Falcon, 

Pontotoc, Miscellany, 

Shieldsboro, Bay St. Louis Gazette, - 

Summit Times, 

Yazoo, Mississippi Democrat, 
Yazoo, Southern Horticulturist, . 

MISSOURI. 

Albany, Grand River News, 

Albany Ledger, 

Bolivar Free Press, .... 
Brookfleld Gazette, - . . . 

Buflfalo, Reflex, 

California, Moniteau jQurnal, 
Canton, Lewis County Gazette. - 
Canton Press, 



MISSOURI. 

Page. ,58i I Cape Girardeau -Vrgus, .... 
50-2 ! Cape Girardeau, Marl)l(> City News, 
.'ioC I Cape tiirardcaa, Missouri Democracy, 
■248 CarroUton, Wakenda Record, 
318 ; Cassville, Barry County Banner, 
■"" Centralia, Southern Home Circle and Lite- 
rary Gem, .--■... 

Charleston Courier, 

(larks ville .Sentinel, ... 

< I >luinbia, Missouri Statesman, 

Fayette Democratic Banner, 

Gallatin Democrat, 

Glasgow Times 



340 
384 
412 
410 



."jOT 
274 

39(5 I 
522 

488 



Page .500 

- (iOO 

395 

.501 

.364 



Hannibal, North Missouri Courier, 
Hartville, South-west News, 
nairisonville Democrat, - 
Ilillsli(iri), Jefferson Democrat, - 
Houstiin, Texas County Pioneer, - 
lluutsville, Randolph Citizen, - 
Independence Democrat, 
Ironton, Iron County Register, - 
Jefferson City, Missouri State Times, 
Jefferson City, People's Tribune, 
^" News, 



402 

300 

472 

35G 

438 i Kansas City [ 

274 j Kansas City Times, - . . . 

266 I Kansas City Tribune, 

Kingston, Caldwell County Sentinel, 
,,„ Kirksville Journal, - ". . . 

\^. , Lathrop Herald, 

}•* i Lexington, Caucasian, 

Linn, Unterrifled Democrat, 



.340 
342 
2.50 
233 
503 
546 
484 
505 
390 
356 
420 
406 
324 
295 
364 
378 



317 

.-)3t; 

oiiO 
536 i 

262 I 



Loviisiana Journal, 4.56 

.Marble Hill, Bollinger County Standard, 294 

Marshiill, Saline County Progress, . - 286 

Mary ville Journal, 5:^2 

Memphis Conservative, 290 

Mexico, Missouri Ledger, - - - - 496 

Mexico, Missouri Messenger, - - . . 49(5 

Nevada City Times, .... 

New London, Ralls County Record, 

Oregon, Holt County Sentinel, - 

Ottcrville, Little Missourian, - 

Palmyra Spectator, .... 

Penyvillc, Post Clarion, - 

Platte City, Platte Countv Reveille, - 

Pleasant Hill Leader, "- 

I'lattsljurg, Clinton County Register, 

Uiehinond Conservator, - 



Uoila i:xpi-ess, 
Kolla Herald, 



Salem Monitor, 
!" j Savannah, New Era, - 



406 
344 
511 
342 

498 
398 
268 
318 
498 
584 
554 
.56') 
314 



Springfield Leader, 554 

Springfield, Missouri Patriot, - - - - 510 

: St. Charles Cosmos, 424 

St. Joseph Gazette, - 393 

St. Joseph Herald, 3()o 

St. Joseph Union, 302 

St. Louis, American Entomolgist, - - .53,5 

St. Louis, American Sunday School Worker, .544 

St. Louis, Anzeiger des Westens, - - 2.59 

St. Louis, Central Baptist, - - - - 483 

St. Louis, Central Christian Advocate, - 541 

St. Louis, Christian Advocate, - - - 266 

St. Louis, Colman's Rural World, - - - 472 

. .27.3 , St. Louis Dispatch, 436 

g0O ' St. Louis, Freemason, ... - - 536 

- .502 I S*^- Louis, Grape Cultiirist, - - - . 535 
3(54 St. Louis Herald, 336 

- 354 ! St. Louis, Home Journal, - - - - 361 
35'i S*^- Louis, Journal of Agriculture, - - .535 

- .544 St. Louis, Journal of Education, - - .551 



42'i 



St. Louis Mail, 



543 I St. Louis, Medical and Surgical Journal, .535 
2r^S 1 St- Louis, Mississippi Blatter, - - - 3.57 
4-2^ St. Louis, Mississippi Valley Review and 

54(j Journal of Commerce, .... .554 

33f; I St. Louis, Missouri Democrat, - - - I'ja 

544 I St. Louis, Missouri Republican, - - - 487 
4.2(; j St. Louis, Presbyterian, - - - 3.-,2 

St. Louis, River Times, 266 

St. Louis Times, 417 

546 I St. Louis Tribune, 249 

274 I St. Louis, Western Commercial (iazette, 361 

294 1 St. Louis, Westliche Post, - - - - 357 

514 I Union Appeal, 413 

508 [ Unionville Republican, .... 334 

.580 Warrenton, Missouri Banner, - - - ,510 

268 Warsaw Times, 3(^4 

.520 I Wentzville News, iqr 



216 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



XEBRASKA. 

Falls City. Notnalia Journal, 
Lincoln. Xelnask:i -^late Journal, 
Lincoln, Nchra.-ka Matcsman, - 
Nebraska ( ity. Ncl.ia.ska Press, - 
Nebraska CitV News, 
Omaha Republican, .... 
Omaha, North-western Journal of 

mcrce, 

Omaha. Central I'nion Agriculturist 
Pawnee Tribune, .... 
Peru, Orchard and Vineyanl, - 
Rule, Nebraska Register, 

NEVADA. 

Hamilton, Wnite Pine News, - 

NEW HAMISHIRE. 

Claremont Eagle, - . - - 

Concord Patriot, 

Concord, Independent Deiuocrut, 

Dover Enquirer, .... 

Dover Gazette, .... 

Dover, Morning .Star. 

East Canaan Reporter, . 

Exeter News Letter, .... 

Great Fall> Journal, 

Bins, lair Mirror, 

Hinsdale. >tar Spangled Banner, 

Laodiiia Dt'iuocrat, .... 

Laki- \illairc Times, 

Littleton. White .Mountain Republic, 

Loudon liidii-c. Household Messenge: 

Manchester, Mirror and Farmer, - 

Manchester Union, 

Nashua Gazette, 

North .Stafford, Monthly Miscellany, 
Pittsfield, Suncook Valley Times, 
Portsmouth Journal, . . . . 
Wolfborough. viranite State News, 

NEW JERSEY. 

Belvidere Apollo, 

Bound Brook. Somerset Argus, 
Bridgeton Chronicle, 
Bridgeton , New Jeisey Patriot, 
Burlington Citizen, 
Clayton Register, 
Clinton Democrat, .... 
Elizabeth Herald, 
Elizalieth, New Jersey Journal. 
Freeliold, Monmouth Democrat. 
Freehold. Monmouth Inquirer, ■ 
Frenchtown I'ress, .... 
Hamnionton, South Jer.sey Rcpublici 
Hightstown (iazctte, .... 
Jersey City. Jersey Blue, 
Jersey City Journal, 
Jersey City Times, .... 
Long Brancli News, .... 
Millville Repuldican, - 
Newark -Vdvertiscr, .... 
Newark Courier. .... 
Newark, Erzachler, .... 
Newark Hcnild, .... 
Newark .Journal, .... 

Newark, New Jersey Freie Zeitung 
Newark. New .lersey Volksman, - 
Newark I'less, . . . . . 
Newark Kegisler, .... 

Newark ,-~eMiiiiel of Freedom, - 
New I'.rmiswiek Kredonian, - 
New I'.nin-wiek Times, - 
Oraiii,'e .JoiMiial, .... 

PlainlieM ( onstitutionalist, 
Somer\ ilie, .-^oiucrsct Gazette. 
Toms Kiver. N<-\v .Jersey Courier, 
Trenton, Heecliers Magazine, 
Trenton. Stale (;azelle.- 
Trenton, True .Vinerican, 
Trenton, fnion Sentinel, ■ 
Vineland Independent. - 
White House Station. Kamilv ('ask( 
Woodbury Constiluthtn, " . 

NEW VOUK. 

Albany, Argus, 

Albany, Colt's Scientific .Vdvertiscr 
Albany Times, ..... 
Albion, Orleans American, . 
Albion, Orleans Republican, - 
Amenia Times, .... 
Angelica Reporter. .... 
.\id)iirn Advertiser, 
Auburn News, 



! NEW YORK. 

Page 406 Avon Journal, Page 296^ 

:518 Bal)ylon South Side Signal, - - - . 454 
3St-2 Ballstou Spa. Ballston .Journal, 
.i!».T Uiith. Steuben Farmers' Advocate, 
4!K) I5in,i,diaiuton Democratic Leader, 
275 Brooklyn Herald, .... 

Brookhn. Inion. 

311 ] Buttalo. Aurora, 

30* Buttalo. ( cm ral Zeitung. 
.538 Bullalo, (liristian Advocate, - 
.503 Bullalo. C oninu^rcial Advertiser, 
4% Bullalo Courier, .... 

Buttalo E.xpress, 

44:J ButTalo Freie Presse, .... 

Buffalo, Journal of Progressive Medicine 
227 Buffalo, Medical and Surgical .Journal, 
4!i;i F.utfalo. National, ..... 

■ >»v, liutfalo Post, 

4S2 Buttalo, Telegi-apb, .... 

5(JU Buttalo, Volks-Freund, .... 

513 Burdett, Local Visitor, .... 
508 Canandaigua, Ontario Reposiiorj- and M 

434 I senger, - . 

322 Canaseraga Advertiser, . ... 

412 Canastota Herald, 

2(55 Candor Free Press, 

522 Canton, St. Lawrence Plain Dealer, . 
542 Carmel, Putnam County Monitor, - 
482 I Cazenovia Republican, . . . - 

418 I Champlain Journal. 

203 Chateaugaj' .Journal, .... 

227 Coeymans Gazette, 

.500 Cold Spring Recorder, .... 
334 Cooperstown, Freeman's Journal, 

514 Cooperstown, Republican and Democrat, 

484 Cortland Journal, 

258 Dansville, Laws of Life, 

Delhi, Delaware Gazette, 
466 Delhi, Delaware Republican, 
•504 Douglas JouriuU, .... 
506 Dunkirk, Advertiser and Union, 
534 Dunkirk, Joui'nal, .... 
441 Edgewater, Staten Island Leatler, 
380 Elmira, Bistoury, .... 
396 Elmira Gazette, . ■. 
407 Fayetteville, Recorder, 

474 Fishkill Journal, 

242 , Fishkill Landing, Fishkill Stamlard, 

580 : Flushing Times, 

294 Forest\iIle,(liatauqua Farmer, 

291 Fort F.dwurd Record, .... 

3'.«i Franklin Kef,nster, .... 

4S2 ' Fulton Times, 

389 Fultonville, Montgomery Countv Republi 

462 can, " . 

:?54 ! Geneva Gazette, 

4.V2 Glen's Falls :\fessonger, 

t'.'i (.lin'- Falls. Warren County Times, • 

\'X> (.1(.\ (■rs\ ille liitellii,'cncer, . 

t'.Ci (.(i-lieri. Independent Republican, 

4.TJ 1 Gou\erne\ir Times, .... 

586 Gowauda (lazctte, 

495 Granville l.'eiiort' r, .... 

587 j (irceniiort. Sutt'olk Times, 
4.")2 (ireenwieli. People's .lournal. 
4.S5 Hamilton. Democratic Republican, 

46.-. Hancock Times, 

426 Havana .lournal, 

560 Ha\ana Fiderprise, .... 
514 Hempstead Iiujuirer, .... 

4;i,s Heiu])stead. (Jueens County Sentinel. 
422 Herkimer Kemoerat. ." . . . 
44(1 Homer, ((.rlland ( oiiidy Uepublican, 
393 Honicllsx i lie. ( ■anisteo'Valley Times, 
212 Hu.Non.( ninml.ia l{e))ublican, . 
531 Hnnlin-lon. Suilolk Rulletin, 

491 Ithaca Democrat, 

4!«i Ithaca. Leader, 

3(is Januiica, Long Island Democrat, 

498 Kin^'ston Press, 

I Lima Recorder, .... 

■5.50 [ Little Falls, .Journal and Courier, - 
321 Little \alley, Cattaraugu.s Republican, 
5l(;Loekport .lournal and Courier, 
■')2s L<uig Island City Star. .... 
2.->.s Lo\v\ ille, .lournal and Republican, .- 
4.s() Lyons Reptdplican, .... * 

.122 Lyons, Wayiu' Democratic Pres.s, 
5l.sMartinsbiirg. Hoys' Journtd, 
695 .Ma> ville, Riuiil .Miscellany, - 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



21T 



Page 



M:W YORK. 

Mexico Imlt'iU'iidi-nt, 

MiiUUftown .Mail, 

MiililU'town, (>i-an{i:o County Press, - 
Middletown, Pulilishers' Circular, 
Montgomery, Republican and Standard - 
Montgomery, Wallliill Valley Times, - 
Monticello, Sullivan County Republican, 

Morris, Chronicle, 

Morrisania, Wcsidicster Times, 
Mount Wtihmi. Chronicle, 

Newark (Ourii.T, 

Newburgh .Journal, 

Newburgh, Wood's Household Magazine, 

New Paltz Times, 

New York Abend Zeitung, ... - 
Xew York, Advertisers Gazette, - 
New York, American Odd Fellow, 

New York, Albion, 

New York, Aldine Press, .... 

New York, American Artisan, 

New York, American Baptist,' - 

New York, American Educational Monthly. 

New York, Ameiican Grocer, 

New York, Amerikanischer Post, 

New York, American Quarterly Church Re 

view, - - - - - 
New York, Appleton's Journal, - 
New York, Atlantische Blatter, 
New York, Bee-Keepers' Journal and Na 

tional Agriculturist, .... 

New York Atlas, 

New York, Belletristisches Journal, - 
New York Billiard Cue, .... 
New York, Boyd's Shipping Gazette, 

New York, Bulletin, 

New York, Catholic World, .... 

New York, Church Journal, 

New York, Christian Advocate, - 

New York, Christian at Work, 

New York, Christain Intelligencer, - 

New York, Christian Leader, - 

New York. Christian Union, - 

New York College Review, 

New York, Comic Monthlj', .... 

New York, Commonwealth, - 

New York, Courrier des Etats-Unis, - 

New York r>ay-Book, .... 

New York, Day's Doings, .... 

New York, Democrat, .... 

New York, Demorest's Monthly Magazine, 

New York, Druggists' Journal, 

New York, Dry Goods Journal, - 

New York, Emerald, 

New York, Engineering and Mining Journa 

New York Era, 

New York, Evangelist, 

New Yoik, Exposition Journal, 

New York Express, - 

New York, Fireside Companion 

New York, Galaxy, 

New York, German-American Cyclopaedia 
New York, Grocers' Journal, - - - 
New York, Grocers' Price Current, - 
New York, Hall's Journal of Health, 
New York, Hardware Price Current, 
New York, Harness and Carriage Journal, 
New York, Harper's Bazar, ... 
New York, Harper's New Monthly Magazin 
New York, Harper's Weeklj', 
New York, Hebrew Leader, 
New York, Hunt's Merchants' Magazine, 
New York, Independent, .... 
New York, Industrial American, - 
New York, Insurance 3Ionitor, - 
New York, Iron Age, .... 

New York, Irish Citizen, . . . . 
New York, Irish People, - . - - 
New York, Irish Republic, . - - . 
New York, Jewish Messenger, 
New York, Jewish Times, .... 
New York, Journal of Applied Chemistry 
New York Landmark, .-..". 
New York, Le Bulletin dc Now York, - 
New York, Le Messager Franco-Americain 
New York, Maple Leaves, - 
New York, Manufacturer and Builder, 
New York Mechanic, .... 
New York, Medical Record. . . - - 
New YotIc, Mendelson's National Bank Note 

Reporter, .... 



NEW YORK. 

antile Journal, 



Pacje 



New York ^Icrt 

New York, Methodist, 

New York, Metropolitan Record, 

New York, Milling Journal, - 

New York. Moore's Rural New Yorker, 

New Y'ork, National Review, - 

New York News, 

New York, New Yorker, . - - . 
New York, New Yorker Journal, 
New Y'ork Observer, .... 

New Y'ork, Official Railway News, - 
New Y'ork, Packard's Monthly, 
New Y'ork Phrenological Journal, 
New York, Pomeroy's Democrat, - 
New Yoi'k, Progress, . . . - 
New Y'ork, Putnam's Magazine, 
New Y'ork, Revolution, . - - - 
New Y'ork, Riverside Magazine for Yoi 

People, 

New York, Saturday Journal, 

New York, Seicntilic American, - 

New York, Scottish American Journal, - 

New York, Slieldon's Dry Goods Price Li.st, 

New York, Shipping and' Commercial List, 

New York, Shoe and Leather Reporter, - 

New Y'oi'k, Silver Tongue, 

New Y'ork, Skandenavisk Post. - 

New Y'ork, Spectator, .... 

New Y'ork, Spirit of the Times, - 

New Y'ork Staats-Zeitung, 

Xew Y'ork, Star, 

New Y'ork, Stieger's Literarischer Monats 

bei'icht, 

New Y'ork, Stockholder, . - ■ - 

New Y'ork Sun, 

New York, Sunday Democrat - 

New York, Sunday School V.'orkman, 

New Y'ork, Sunday Times, and Noah's 

Weekly Messenger, 
New York'Telegram, 
New Y'ork Times, . . - . 

New Y'ork Transcript, - 
New Y'ork Tribune, ... - 
New Y'ork. Turf, Field and Farm, 
New York Underwriter, 
New Y'ork Weekly Review, • 
New Y'ork, Western World, 
New Y'ork Working Farmer, 
New York, Workshop, 
Niagara Falls Gazette, - 
Nunda, Livingston Democrat, 

Nnnda News, 

Nyack, City and Country, 
Olean, Golden Rule, 
Oneonta Heralil. ... - 

Otego, Literary Record, 

Owego Gazette, 

Owego Trade Reporter, 

Oxford Times, 

Peekskill, Highland Democrat, • 

Peekskdl Enterprise, 

Penn Yann Express, 

Penn Yan, Yates County Chronicle 

Perrv. .Silver Lake Sun, 

Plielps Citizen, 

PlK.-nix Register, . - - - 
I'lattsliurgh Republican, - 
Plattsburgli Sentinel, - 
Port Byron Times, .... 
Port JelTerson, Independent Press. 
Potsdam, Courier and Freeman, - 
Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Farmer, 
Poughkeepsie Morning News, - 
Poughkeepsie Press, 
Poughkeepsie Telegraph, 
Red Hook Advertiser, - 
Rhinebeck Tribune, . - - - 
Rochester American Fnrjner and School 

Visitor, ... 
Rochester Beobachter, 
Rochester Chronicle, 
Rochester Democrat. 
Rochester Earnest Christ 

Rule, .... 

Rochester Express, 
Rochester, Volksblatt, 
Rockville Center, Picket, 
Rome, Roman Citizen, 
Rondout Freeman, - 
Sag Harbor, Corrector, 



218 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



NEW YORK. 

Sag Harbor Express, 
SaiKlv Hill ll<'ral<l, - 
SariitoiTii sprinfJTs, Saratoga Senli 
Saufjcrlics, TcU'f^rapli, 
Schciu'ctadv »;azettc, 
Schenectady Ueflector, - 
Sclieiicctnily.star, - - - • 
Schenectady Inion, - 
Scllene^•u.s Monitor, 
Schenevus, Valley News, • 
Schoharie Republican, - 
Schoharie I'nion, 
Scott, Salibatli School Gem, - 
Scott, True Kel'orinor, 
Sidney I'lains, Star, 
Sing Sing, Democratic Register, 
Southold, Wonder, - - - - 
Syracuse, American Wosleyan, 
Syracuse Journal, - - - - 
Troy, Northern Budget, - 

Troy, Press, 

Troy, Weekly Press, - 

Tully, Southern Onondaga, - 

Utiea Herald, .... 

Utica, Temperance Patriot, - 

Warsaw, Masonic Tidings, 

Warsaw, Wyoming Democrat, 

Warwick .Vdvertiser, 

Watertown, New York Reformer, 

Watei-town Reunion, - 

Watertown Times, - - - - 

Waterh30, Observer, 

Waverly, Advocate, 

AVellsville, Alleghany Democrat, 

We-sttiekl Republican, - 

West Troy, Albany County Democrat, 

Whitehall Sun, 

Windham Centre, Windham Journal, 
Yonkers, Gazette, .... 
Yonkers, Statesman, . . . - 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

.Vsheville Pioneer, 

Charlotte Bulletin, .... 

Charlotte Courier, 

Charlotte, Carolina Observer, 
Charlotte, Carolina Times, - 
Elizabeth City, North Carolinian, 
Fayetteville, "Eagle, .... 
Goldsboro Carolina Messenger, 
Green.sboro Patriot, .... 
New-Berne Journal of Commerce, 

New-Berne Times, 

Raleigh, Episcopal Methodist, 
Raleit;li, Fiiend of Temperance, 
Ralei-li, standard, . - - - 

Rid^M•wa^ I'n'ss, 

Rutlierlordlou, Clirislian Union, - 
Rutlierlonlloii, Kullicrrord Star. 
Ruthciinrdfon, W'csti in N'indicator. 
Statcsvillc, Aniirican, - - - - 
Weldon, Roanoke News, - 

Wilmington Post, 

WlLson, Plaindealer, - - - - 

OHIO. 

Antwerp (la/.ette, 

Barnesvill(^ lOnterprisc, - 
Bellelontaine I'ro.ss, .... 
Bellelontaiiie Republican, 

Bryan I'ress, 

Bueyrus, Crawford County Forum, 

Cadiz Uepublican, 

Caldwell, Noble (Jouidy Republican, 

Canton, Sta'rk Connlv i)eino(Tat, - 
Canton Kciio.sitory and Uepublican, 
Chal-dun, (leauga 'hemoerat, 
Chillieothe .\dycrt is.r. 
Cincinnati, Ainrriiaii Freemason, 
Cincinnati, American ( hristian U<t\ ic 
Cincinnati, Cluistian siandard, 
Cincinnati, (hristian World, 
Cincinnati, Cliri.stii.he Apologcte, 
Cincinnati Chronicle, 
Cincinnati (itizc^n, .... 
Cincinnati Courier, 
Cincinnati, i:clectic, - • - - 
Cincinnati, Kch'ct ic MtMlical Jorrnal. 
Cincinnati i;n<|nirer. 
Cincinnati, Free Nation, 
Cincinnati, tiohlen lloiir-;. 



OHIO. 

•innati. Herald ami Presbyter, 

■innati .Journal ol Connncrce, 



Page 



itc 



Cincinnati, Journal and .Messenger, 

• 'incinnati. Ladies' Repository, 
1 Cincinnati, Merchants' and Manufacturers' 
1 Bulletin, 

Cincinnati, Our Boys in Blue, 

Cincinnati I'rice Current, 
I Cincinnati, Kuralist, 
1 Cincinnati, Spirit of the West, 
[ Cincinnati, Star in the West, 

(.'incinnati Times, 

Cincinnati, Western Christian A 

Cincinnati, Western World, 
I Circleyillc Democrat, 
1 Clev 

ll^ley: 
I Clev. 

Cl.'V. 

Clev. 

Cleyi 

Ciey. 

Cleyi 

Cle\. 

Clev. 



Messenger, 



luia 



■land llci-ald, .... 
land, Eiglit for the World, 
land, National Temperance Era, 
land, Ohio Farmer, 
land I'lain Dealer, - 
land, Wachter am Erie, 



Coh 
Coll 



Witness, 



Coliinibus, Odd Fellow's Companion, 
Coliiiubns, Ohio Slate Journal, - 
I Columbus, Oliio Statesman, - 
! Columbus, Sunday Morning News, ■ 
I Daytcni, Herald oi' Oospcl Liberty, 
I)a\'ton, KcligicnisTclcsi-ope, 
Dajtoii, Temperance Times, 
j Da.\ ton, Woman's Advocate, 
Deiiance lOxjn-esS, .... 

Delaware (.azette, 

I)r.>s,leii Monitor, ... - 

East Liverpool Record, 

Eat (HI Deniorrat, ... - 

Eaton i;e<,Mster, 

Elyria Constitutionalist, - 
El> ria Independent Democi-at, - 
1 Fi'nclla>-, Hancock Courier, 
Findlay. Hancock JetTersonian, 
Fremont, Democratic Messenger, 
Fremont .Journal, 

Garretsyille, Iloine Bazar, - 

Germantown DollarTimes, - 

HamnKuidsville, Imlependeut, 
I Hillsliorough Gazc^ltc, 

Hillsl)orougli,Higliland News. ■ 
; Hubbard, Miner's Journal, 

I Jac-kson H(>rald, 

I Jackson standard, .... 
• Kenton Uepublican, . - . . 

Lebanon, Wcvsiern Star, - 

Lcnidon, .Mailison County Democrat. 

Manchester, (..azette, 

Marion Democratic Mirror, - 

.Marion Independent, 
[ Marvsville Tribune, . . - . 
I MasMllon, American, 
! Mc.Artlitir, Democratic- Eminirer, 
1 Medina, Mediiia County (iazclte, • 
Miamisburg Bulletin, - - - . 

Middleporl, Meigs Comity I'ress, 
Mount (Ulead, .Morrow County Scid 



I'.UcKeye Stale, 



irg.i 



Piipia Dei 
Piiina. Miami Valley N. 
Port ( linton, Ottawa C 
Portsmontli Repulilicai 
Portsmouth Tribune-, 



Shell 



Steul 

St. c: 
St. c 



-pen 



i\ ille. llc-lm. 
svillc(;azc-tt 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



219 



OHIO. 

Tiffin Tribune, 

Tiffin Star, 

Tippoeanoe City Herald, 

Toledo 151 ade, " 

Toledo Commercial, 
Toledo Express, .... 
Toledo, Whitney's Musical Guest, 
Uliriclisville, Tuscarawas Chronicle, - 
Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County Repub 
lican, 



Page -iryS 
548 



Upper Sandusky, Wyandot Democrat 
Union 



li^rbana Temperance Review, 

Van Wert Bulletin, ..... 

Wadsworth Enterprise, 

Walnut Hills, Our Village Xews, - 

Warren, Western Reserve Chronicle, 

Waverly, Pike County Republican, 

Wellsville Advertiser, .... 

West Salem, True Citizen, 

Youngstown, Mahoning Register, 

Zanesville Courier, 

Zanesville Signal, 

OREGON. 

Albany Register, 

Salem, Willamette Farmer, 

PENNSTLVANIA. 

Alleghany, Times, 

AHentown, Lehigh Regi-ster, 
Allentown, Lehigh Valley News, - 

Beaver Argus, 

Bedford Gazette, 

Bedford Inquirer, 

Berwick Gazette, 

Bethlehem Moravian, .... 

Bethlehem, Times, 

Bloody Ru'i, Bedford County Press, 
Bloomsburg Republican, - ' - 
Bfookville Jeflfersonian, 
Carbondale Advance, .... 
Center Hall, Center Reporter, - 
Chambersburg, Public Opinion, - 

Chester Advocate, 

Chester, Delaware Countj' Democrat, - 
Chester, Delaware County RL-publican, 

Clarion Republican, 

Clearfield Republican, .... 

Columbia Herald, 

Conneautville, Record and Courier, - 

Corry, Republican, 

Doylestown, Bucks County Intelligencer 
Doylestown Democrat, .... 

Easton Argus, 

Easton Free Press, 

Ebensburg Alleghanian, 
Ebensburg Cambria Freeman, 

Erie Dispatch, 

Erie Gazette, 

Erie Republican, 

Franklin, Venango Citizen, - 
Germantown Chronicle, 
Gettysburg Compiler, .... 
Gettysburg, Star and Sentinel, - 
Great Bend, Northern Penns^ivanian, 
Greencastle, Valley Echo, -" 

Hanover Citizen, 

Harrisburg Patriot, .... 

Harrisburg Telegraph, .... 
Hollidaysburg Register, 

Homesburg Gazette, 

Honesdale, Wayne County Democrat, 
Honesdale, Wayne County Herald, 
Huntingdon, Globe, .... 

Indiana Democrat, 

Kittanning, Democratic Sentinel. 
L-incaster, Father Abraham, - 
Lancaster Intelligencer, 
La Porte, Sullivan Free Press, 
Lebanon Advertiser, .... 

Lebanon Courier, 

Lebanon, Pennsylvanier, - 
Lewistown Gazette, .... 

Littlestown Press, .... 

Lock Haven, Clinton Republican, 
Manaynnk, Clircmicle and Advertise 
Mauch Chunk. Carbon Denio.-rat, 
Maucli Chunk Co il (iazette, . 
McConnelsburg, Fulton Demoi'rat, - 
McConnelsburg, Fulton Republican, . 
Mercer, Western Press, - - . - 



PENNSYLV.\MA. 

Middleburg Post, .... 
Middletown Journal, .... 
Mifflintown, Democrat and Register, - 
Mirtlintown, Juniata Sentinel, . 

Milford Herald, 

Miltord Square, Reformer and Pennsylv; 

nia Advertiser, 

Milton, Miltonian, 

Montrose Democrat, 

Mount Joy Herald, 

Muncy, Luminary, 

New Bloomflelil, Bloomtield Times, 
New Bloomtield, People's Advocate an 

Press, 

New Bloomfleld,"l>erry County Democrat 
Norristown, Independent, 



4i;6 



404 
342 
.500 
294 



Oil City Times, 272 



Parki'sbui-g, American Stock Journal 
i Philadelphia, Abend Post, .... 

Philadelphia, Age, 

Philadelphia, American Exchange and Re- 

j view, 

I Philadelphia, American (inanliiwi, 
Philadelphia, Architectural Ucvicw and 

American Builder's .loiirnal. - 
Philadelphia, Arthur's Home Magazine, - 
I Philadcliiliia, Rontl of Peace, - - . . 

Pliiladelphia, bulletin, 

Pliilaileliihia, Catholic Standard, - 
( liild's Treasury, - 
Christian Recorder, 
Christian Statesman, - 
;ity Item, - ... 

Conmiercial List and Price 



Philadelphia 

Phila.lelphii 

Philadelphi: 

Philadelphi; 

Philadelphi; 
j Current, . - . ^u^ 

Philadelphia Day, 264 

! Philadelphia Demokrat, 2B7 

Philadelphia, Die Republikanische Flagge, 002 



412 
.t12 
.■)19 
.MS ' 

;!:.2 

.-)0(i 

nm '■■ 

4S0 
.■JIO I 
412 j 
.i!)6 I 
.-,48 1 
47(i 
474 
242 
510 
474 



Philailelphia, Educational Gazette, 
Philudelphia, Episcopalian, 
Pliiladelphia, Evei-y Week, . . . . 
Philadelphia Freie Presse, . . - . 
Philadelphia, Gardener's Monthly, 
I'hiladelphia, Good Words, 
Philadeli)hia, Good Words for the Yonng, 
Philadelphia, (iuardian, - . . .' . 

I'hiladeliihia, Herald, 

Philadelphia, JiKiuirer, 

Philadelphia, Journal of the Farm, - 

Philadelphia, Keystone, 

Philadelphia, Knights of Pythias Journal, 
Philadelphia, Lady's Friend, .... 
Philadelphia, Lanlmerliirte, 
Philadelphia, Lippincott's Magazine, - 
Philailelphia, Lutheran Observer, 

Philadelphia .Mail, 

Phihulelphia, Methodist Home Journal, - 
Philadelphia, National r.aptist, 
Philadelphia, < )dd Felluw's Journal, - 
Philailelphia, Our Sehoolday Visitor, - • - 
Philadelphia, Patliflnder, .... 
Philadelphia, People's Journal, 

Philadelphia, Post, 

Phihulelphia, Practical Farmer and Itural 

Advertiser, 

Philadelphia, Presbyterian, 

Philadelphia, Press, 

Philadelphia, Printers' Circular, 



113 
406 
4.52 
602 
330 
448 
448 
226 
264 
401 
444 
604 
304 
602 
226 
448 
493 
535 
600 
272 
450 
450 
367 
348 
475 

485 
448 
453 



Philadelphia, Programme, . - . - 408 
pliia, Public Ledger, - - . 337 
l)hia, Reformed Church Messenger, 226 
phia, Ueiormite Kirchenzeitung, 220 



lelphi 
lelphi 
lelphi 
lelphi 

l.^lphi: 

lelphi 



turdav Evening Post, 
turday Night, - 
entiflc Jouriial, - 
mtagsBlatt, 



Philadelphia, Sunday Republic, - 
Philadelphia, Sunday Magazine, - 
Philadelphia, Sunday Mercury, 
Philailelphia, Sunday .Morning, ■ 
Philadelphia, Sunday Morning Times, 
Philadelphia, Telegraph, 
I'hiladelphia, rnderwriter, 
Philadelphia, \'esi)crtine, 
Philadelphia, Young Folk's News, 
Pittsburgh, Christian Advocate, - 
Pittsburgh, Christian Radical, - 
Pittsburgh Dispatch, 



226 
602 
411 
455 
■:02 
475 
606 
448 
450 
377 
216 
444 
278 
408 
448 
470 



220 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



PENXSTLVAMA. 

Pittsbiir},'h,Freihcits Fremid, 
Pitt>lnir,irh Leader, .... 

Pittsliuri,'li, Leisure Hours, 

lMttsl)urtili MaiL 

Pitlsliur.irh, l'rcsl)\t<'i-ian P.aimer, 
Pittsbui-fjrh, riiitcd l'resljvl<Tian. 
Pittsbui-frh, \-oll<sl,latt, ■- 
Pittsl)urj,'li, Weekly Minor, 
Pittston Gazette, .... 
Punxsutawney Plainrtealer, 
Qtuikertown Indepemlent, 
Roadins, Republikaner von Berks, - 
KiilKway, Elk County Advocate, - 
St. Marys Elks County Railroad and Mi 

Gazette, 

Selins^jrrove, American Lutheran, 
Shippensburg News, .... 
South Bethlehem, Xorthampton Const 

tive, - ' 

Str<)Ildsbur^^ Monroe Democrat, - 
Sunliiny ATueriean, . . - . 
Sunl)uiy, Dt-inocratic Guard, - 

Sunbury Gazette, 

Susquehanna Depot, Journal. 
Susquehanna Depot, Eniii^rant Farniei 
Tamaqua.Ajithraeite Monitor, 
Titusville, Lons Roll, - - . . 
Towanila. Kradtord Iteport.'r, 
Tyrone. Clinstian Family < ouiiJaiiion, 
L'hiontdwn. .\inericaii Snnulard, - 
Unioutdwii. Genius of Liberty, - 
Wavnesbiiri,s Messen^-er, - "- 
Wayneslnn-K. R.'pository, - ■ - 
Welisborn, Denioerat, . . . . 
Wellsboro, Tiof<a County Agitator, - 
West Chester, JefTersonian, - 
West Philadelphia Star, 
Wilkes-Barre, Record of the Times, - 
Williamsport, Lycoming Standard, - 
Vork, Democratic Press, . - . . 
York, True Democrat, .... 
York, Review, 



■iLAXD. 



RHODE 

Bristol Phoenix, 

Providence Press, .... 

Providence Star, 

Wakelield. Narragansett Times, - 

Warren Gazette, 

Woonsocket Patriot, .... 

SOUTH CAUOUNA. 

Abbeville Press and Banner, - 
Anderson Tnfelligeneer, 
Barnwell. Journal, .... 
Charleston, Missionarv Record, 
Charl.-ston, Keiiubliea'n, 
Charleston, Rural Carolinian, - 
Charleston, Soutliern Celt, 
Charleston, .MX Centnrv, - 
Cheraw, Cliesteilield Dc^inoerat, - 
Clinton, Farm and Gard.-n, - ■ 
Cohunbia.Clnistian Neigiibnr. 
Coliimliia, Southei-n Presbyterian, - 
Conwavboro, llorrv News," . 
Darlington Democrat, .... 
Darlington Southerner, - 
Edgelield .\dverli.ser. .... 
Georgct.iwi. Times, . . - . 
(Jreenviile .Mounlainer, 
(;reenville. Southern Enterprise, - 

Laneast(n- Ledger, 

Marion star and Sonthern Real Kstatt 

vertiser, 

Xewbeiry, Heralil, - . . . 

Sumter, .News, 

Union, Times, 

Yorkville, Working Christian, 

TKN.NKSSKK. 
Bolivar Hidletin, .... 

Djcisliurg, Neal's State Gazette, 
Fayctteville, Lincoln County News, 
(;allatin, i:xaniiner, .... 
G'reenville, National I'nicni. 

Jacks. .n TiibuiH', 

Jonesborongh, Cnion Flag. - 
Kingston, Fast Tcnnc.ssceai", 
Kmixvilli', I'ress and Herald, • 
Marx \ ille, l{epubli<-:in, .... 
McMinnvllle Enterprise, ... 



TENNESSEE. 

/'«(7t -W? McMlnnvilb', XewEra, - 
.-.■i;! M<-mi,bis, Public Ledger, 

Memphis, Paplist. 

Memphis. Southern Farmer. - 
Nashvill.'. (nion and American, 
Nashville, Home Monthly, 

Pulaski. Citizen, 

Sweetwater Enterprise, - 

TE.XAS. 

Anderson, Texas Gladiator, 
Brownsville Rancliero, 

Dallas Herahl, 

Denton .Monitor, 

<iainsville Vedette, . . . . 

Houston Times, 

Houston Union, 

Lockliart,T.'.xas Plow Bov, - 

St. Marys, Va.pu'ro, - " - - - 

San .\iigustine Beacon, - 

siin .\ntonio, Freie Presse lur Texas, 
San .\ntonio, Texanische Fanner Zei 
San .Marcos Pioneer, - - - . 
T\ler, National Index, . . . . 

T\ler Reporter, 

Weatherford Times, . . . . 

VERMONT. 

Bradford, National Opinion, - 
Brattleboro, Household, 
Brattlel)oro, Vennont Record and Fa 
Burlington Free Press and Tinii's, 
Ludlow-, P.lack River (iazette, 
Lyndon, \ermont Union, - 
Montpelier .\rgus and Patriot, 

Newport F.xjir.'ss, 

Poullnev Bulletin, ... - 

I'onltnev. Rnlland County Journal. 

Rutland'Hcrald, . '. . . 

Rutland Indepemlent, - - - . 

' St. Johnsbury Caledonian, 

'. Swanton, F'ranklin County Journal, 

I West Randolph, Orange County I^agli 

j VIKGINIA. 

Abing<ion Virginian, 

Bovdton, Tobacco Plant, - ■ 

Bri.stol News, 

Charlottesyille Chronicle, - 

Danxillc Times, 

Fre<licksl)urgXews. . - . . 
Jetfersonville, Clinch Valley N.'ws, 
Harrisonlairg, Rockingham Register. 
Leesburg, Loudoiui Rciinblican. - 

Leesbnrg, Mivnu', 

Lura.x-, Page Courier, 

I^ynchburg Press, 

Lynchburg liei^ublican, - 
Lynchburg \'ir,ginian, . . . . 

New Maiket. siienandoah Vallev, 
Norfolk Dav Look, .... 

Xorlolk \ irginiau, 

PittsNlvania Court House. Clialliam Ti 
Richlnoud, Commercial, ■ 
KMclunond Dispatch, . - . . 



4W 
•271 
298 
57« 
•24!l 

.oO(i 
.502 
37(1 
402 
4CG 

334 
4<Ji) 

VM 
2.57 
492 

.52n 

418 
4(i4 

4!;8 
;i22 

410 ! 

3.52 

.548 

246 

596 

342 

490 

608 

522 

314 

332 

590 

466 

598 

456 



368 
5.55 
555 
508 
534 
534 

260 
490 
415 
.550 
508 
408 
546 
55!) 
322 



Page 512 

- 272 

.59<i 

- 6(8 



3!H 
470 
358 
312 
336 



604 
.523 
470 
326 
514 
536 
466 
4! 2 
306 



lucati 



rs (i 



dus 



Riclun< 
Richnn 



d, Seminai-\- Maga> 
d, .-^tate Journal, 
d Whig, 

Spcclat(U-, 

Vallev Virginian. 



Tappahanno.-k, Es-ex (J 
Williamsburg, \irgiuia 
Winchester .Sentinel, 
Woodstock, Shenaudoal 



274 
399 
298 
278 
413 
413 
413 
382 
387 
428 



510 
340 



546 
MO 
2.54 
266 
2.54 
402 
474 
519 

498 
480 
488 
372 
.526 
500 
486 
482 
313 
4!,<0 
.524 



- 5.55 
504 

- 390 
4iK) 

- .514 
■ 587 

bnne..596 

- 366 
603 

Lrinia,371 
trial 

:5.S2 

- 392 
540 

- 319 
509 

- 482 
304 

- 272 
406 

• 386 



.2-,.2 WEST VIH<iIMA. 

364 Ilcrkeley Springs Morgan .Mercmy, 

512 Charleston, Kamiwha itepublican. 

262 Charleston, Primitive Methodist. - 

.523 Chariest.. n, West \irginia .(ourmil 

.526 Clarksburg. Nati. .mil Telegraph, - 

316 Eli/.abelb, Wirt Count v Denu.erut, 

.i'.Mi llanisville, West NirLTinia .■star, 

■..V.' khiLrw.....l, Prest.Mi Count v .lourna 

:;i-.' Marl insbnrg Star. . . . - 

■.\1-1 Moun.lsville, National, • 



4(14 
.580 
.542 
250 

Am 

.527 
480 
480 
227 
418 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



221 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

Parkersbiirs- Times, 
Parkersbury (iazettc, 
Paikersbui-iT state Journal, - 
Well.sburg Jlei-ald, - 
Wheeling Intelligencer, - 
Wheeling Registivr, 

WISCONSIN. 



Paf/c 4()4 
(iOO 

- 490 
.ViO 

- olO 
;!71 



Alma Express. 

Appleton Crescent, 

Appleton, Lawrence Collegian, - 
Augusta, Herald, . . . . . 

Heav(>r Dam Argus, .... 
B 'aAcr Dam, Dodge County Citizen, - 

P.eloit .Journal, 

Berlin Courant, 

Black River Falls, Badger State Bannei 
Burlington Standard, - . . . 

Durand Times, 

Ellsworth, Pierce County Herald, 
Fond du Lac Journal, .... 
Fort Atkinson Herald, . . . . 
Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin Chief, 
Friendship, Adams County Press, 
Green Bay Advocate, .... 

Green Bay Gazette, 

Janesville Gazette, .... 
Janesville, Rock County Recorder, - 
Juneau, Dodge County Democrat, 

La Crosse Leader, 

Madison Democrat, 

Madison, Wisconsin State Journal, - 
Madison, AVestern Farmer, 
Manitowoc Tribune, .... 

Mauston Star, 

Milwaukee American Churchman, - 
Milwaukee Banner und Volks Freund, 
Milwaukee Herold, .... 

Milwaukee Index. 

Milwaukee Xews, 

Milwaukee. Nord Westliclie Acker i 

Gartenbau Zeitung, .... 
Milwaukee N'orth-western Advance, - 
Milwaukee .sci'-l'.ote, - - . . 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Mineral I'oint, .Scliool Monthly, - 
Mineral Point, National Democrat, - 
Montello, Marquette Express, 
Neilsville, Clark County Journal, 
Neilsville, Clark County Republican, - 
New Richmond, St. Croix Republican, 
Oconomowoc, La Belle Mirror, 

Plover Times, 

Prairie du Cliien Union, .... 

Prescott Journal, 

Princeton Republic, 

Racine, Racine Countj^ Argus, - 
Sheboygan, Sheboygan County Herald, 

Sparta Eagle, 

Sturgeon Bay, Door County Advocate, 

Superior, Tribune, 

Tomah Journal, 

Trempeauleau, Trempealeau County 

cord, 

Viroqua, Vernon County Censor, 

Waukesha Freeman. 

Waupun Times, 

West Bend Democrat, .... 
Weyauwega Times .... 

COLORADO. 

Denver, Rocky Mountain News, - 



.506 
454 
514 
4!j2 
5(36 
583 
559 
494 
255 

2.34 
470 
312 
575 
294 
498 
.584 
493 
532 
399 
.520 
492 
482 
534 
456 
(i04 
497 
502 
378 
428 
372 

241 
424 
.552 



IDAHO. 

Boise City, Capital Chronicle, 
Boise City Statesman, - 

MONTANA. 

Deer Lodge City Independent, 

UTAH. 

Corinne, Utah Reporter, 
Salt Lake City Telegraph,, 

AVASHINGTON. 

Olympia, Eclio, ... 

WYOMING. 

Cheyenne Leader, 
Laramie Citjf Sentinel, - 
South Pass News, 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Moncton, Times, . . . . 

St. John Advertiser, - 

St. Stephen, St. Croix Courier, ■ 

St. Stephen, Times, - 

Shediac, Le Moniteur Acadian, ■ 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

Amhei'st, Gazette, - - . . 
Halifax, Acadian Recorder, - 
Halitax, Journal of Education, 
Halifax, Royal Gazette, - 

ONTARIO. 

Almonte Gazette, . . . . 
Arnprior, Canadian Times, - 
Belleville, Hastings Chronicle, - 
Bowmanville Merchant, 
Bowmanville, Observer, 
Caledonia, Grand River Sachem, 
Cayuga, Haldimand Advocate, - 



Page 



356 

356 
356 

320 
268 
274 
4(U 
434 



Elora Observer, 

Goderich Star, - 

Listowel Banner, 

London, Prototype, 

London, Educator, 

Mount Forest Examiner, 

Mount Forest Confederate 

Whitby Chronicle, (jog 

QUEBEC. 

Aylmer Times, 286 

Granby Gazette, 307 

Granby Messager Canadian, - - . - 307 

Montreal, Canada Scotsman, - - •. 370 

Montreal, New Dominion Monthly, . - - 296 

Stanstead Journal, 330 

West Farnham, Farnham Banner, - . 243 

West Farnham, L'Echo de Farmham, - 243 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

St Johns News, 543 

St. Johns, Royal Gazette and Newfoundland 
Advertiser, 3.2^ 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Franklin Printing Company, Middletown, 



New York 



372 



German American Cyclopajdia, New York, 549 
Kellogg, A. N., Cliicago, 111., . - . 33S-339 

294 
- 348 



Leach & Bates, Traverse City, Mich., 
Lovell, John, Montreal, D. C, - 
Menamin, Robert S., Philadelphia, Pa., 
One Inch in 2,.500 Newspapers, 

Printing Material, 

Quinn, Heniy W., New York, - 
Rowell, Geo. P. & Co., .... 
Ruthertord & Owen, Bentonville, Ark., 
Schermerhorn, J. W. & Co., New York, 
To any Advertiser, 



238 
232 
465 
224 

508 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Advertisers Gazette. 



40 PARK KO^', A'EW YORK. 



GEO. P. ROWELL & CO., Publishers. 



Terms— 50 Cents Per Annum, in Advance. 



ADVERTISIIVG : 

25 Cents Per liiue. - - $25 Dollars Per Page. 



The Gazette is issued on the first of each quarter, and is the only paper in the country devoted 
exclusively to the interests of Advertisers and Publishers. 



Each number contains a detailed statement of all 
Wew Newspapers, 

Enlargements and Improvements, 

Bfe^vspaper Changes, 

Consolidations, 

Suspensions, 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 
Together with such information concerning bogus agencies and advertisers as the publisher 
are able to secure. 



Intelligent and competent writers contribute regularly to its columns, and its articles upon 
reives ot Successful Advertisers, 

How to Manage ]Ve-*vspapers, 

The Btst ^Vay to Advertise, 

The Circulation of Newspapers, 
Hints to Advertisers, 

Eminent IVe^vspaper Men, 

Advertising Rates, Etc., Etc. 
Will be found full of interest and value to all. 



EVERT ADVERTISER SHOlir,© READ THE GAZETTE. 

He will save both time and money by so doing, and acquire an amount of practical and 
valuable information, to be obtained from no other source. 

Subscriptions received at any time. B ick num'jers cannot hs furnished. 



234 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 




«KO. P. ROAVELl, & CO'S ADVERTISIIVG AGEiVCY, IVo. 40 PAKK KO^V, IV. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS RECEIVED FOR ALL AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS AT PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

Our arraugeineiit.'S for the careful nuti iiietlioflicnl transaction of our btisiiiess 
are most complete, ninl a<lvertlsers coiilil attoril to pay an increaseil i>rice to secure 
our sci-vices >vere it neccHsary. Itut such is not the case, as our commissions are 
paid by Publishers, and the rates at ^vhich we contract are lower than could be 
obtained from the offices of the newspapers direct. 



Kach IVe^vspaper is exiiiiiined daily l>y competent persons, and every insertion 
of each advertisement checked upon books kept for tlie pur)>ose. If any omissions 
occur, the Publishers are duly notifled and required to make the full number of 
insertions good. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 325 



THE MOST MBERAI. TERMS TO ADVERTISERS. 



The Toledo Blade^ 



NASBY'S PAPER. 



THE PUBLISHER WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM ADVERTISERS THAT THE 
■Weekly Blade has attained the remarkable circulation of 100,000 copies, and is read by the 
most enterprising, thrifty, well-to-do Farmers, Mechanics, Merchants and Manufacturers in the 
United States. This of itself makes it an ADVERTISING MEDIUM far superior to any other 
WEEKLY PAPER published west of New York city. There is no doubt in the minds of the pub- 
lishers that not less than 500.000 persons read the Blade every week. The shrewd advertiser 
must easily understand the advantage of advertising in the Blade. 

RATES OF ADVERTISIIVG : 

Ordinary advertisements (Nonpareil, solid), - - - 40 cents per line each insertion. 

•Special Notices (Nonpareil, leaded), - - - - - 60 " " " " " 

Editorial or Business Notices (Minion, leaded), - - - 70 " " " " " 

The average number of words (Nonpareil, solid) in an inch is 90— twenty-two (22) inches 
make a column. 

Double column advertisements same rates as above. 

Cuts or stereotypes, on metal bodies, one-third (1-3) additional to regular rates. 

Advertising estimates furnished promptly upon application. 



The Daily Blade 



flAS MORE THAN DOUBLE THE CIRCULATION OF ANY OTHER DAILY PUBLISHED 

in Toledo. Issued everj' evening (except Sunday). Has an extensive circulation in Northern 
Ohio, Southern Michigan, Northern Indiana and Central Illinois. 

RATES OF ADVEBTISIJVG : 



One month, - - - - . - $8 00 

Three months, - - - - - 15 00 

Six months, - - - - - 24 GO 

One year, 40 00 



One day, - - - - - $ 80 

Two days, - - - - - 1 50 

One week, 3 00 

Two weeks, - - - - - 5 00 

Special Notices 25 per cent, additional to above rates. 

Every other day advertisements one-third less than regular rates. 

Local Notices 15 cents per line first insertion, 10 cents per line per day thereafter. 

Editorials calling attention to advertisements, or for the benefit of private interests, 20 cents 
per line. 

Twenty -five and one-half (25 1-2) inches make a column in the Daily Blade. 

No advertisement taken lor less than 50 cents. 

Double column advertisements taken at regular rates. 

Outs, invariably on metal bodies, 33 1-3 per cent, additional to rates. 

flS" We solicit advertisements through any regular Advertising Agent; or for further par- 
■tiiculars, if parties desire to deal directly with the Publishers, address 

>IIt.t,EK, L.OCKE &, CO., 
Publishers and Proprietoi-s, Toledo, Ohio. 

Toledo, Ohio, April 1, 1870. 

15 



godly 


mnnh( 




t li<)us;i 


The 


•' Ukfi 


amoiifi 


the (;. 


consKK 


•ralilf I 



AMERICAN NEWSPArER RATE-BOOK. 



The Reformed Church Publications, 

KKKOU>IKI» < miti'II MKSSKXiKK. I [|J^^.; u. u. ^l Isi'^bljlL! A. M.. 1 ^-"'i'"'■'^• 
lt KH»H.M I KTK KIUtHKXZi:iTr:^<i, «;i AKIHAA, (MontlUy ) 
REVIKW (Uuarterly), CIIII.,I>'S TKKA.SIKY, 
I.A.nMKKHIKTi:. 

Wf call attention to the Heformeil Church Publications, as afl'onling a lirst-class meiliuni lor 
advertising in a Church Membership of about 100,000. 

The " Kefokmki) ( hi it( II Mi;sskngkk" is a large double sheet quarto religious family wi ekly, 
of a high order, circulating, as the official organ of the Synod, in the English portion of the 
Ileformcd Church. It goes into 'iiaiiv families where no other religious paper is taken. The 
State's in which it luaiiily circulalrs" ,irc rciinsvlvania .Alarvland, Virginia and Oliio. with a 
-ulisciih. Ts ill Mates iMrtliiv w'.-st an.l SdiiUi. It is read regularly by perhaps 
trscuis ; and is a " No 1 " n in Hum Inr clKiice general (not local) advertising. 
i; IK Kli:( lll,N/.i:i 11 Nt. '■ is ihc (ii'rman i tr^ran of the .Synod. Its circulation i.* 
n ( hurclii> in I'liihulclpliia. New 'lOrk, J'.altinune "and Cincinnati, with a 
poiiulafidu r<'iiri'scntc<l on its subscrijiticin list. 
The • Gi Ai;iii.\.N," a .Monllily .Maga/iuf, and the ■■|{i;vii,\v," a Tlu ological Quarterly, together 
having a circulation of over two thousantl, will atlinii proper advertisements on their covers. 

aS'We admit no humbug schemes or what is known as quackerj-. Nothing unreliable i.9 
a<lvertised, and our reading public know this. 

KATES FOR ADVEKTISI.\« : 

The rates, which for so choice a circidation will be found low, are as follows : 
1 square or less, for 1 month or less, - $3 00 I 1 square or less, for G months or less, - $12 .'.0 
1 square or less, for 3 months or less, - 7 50 | 1 square or less, for 1 year or less, - - 20 00 

A square ot ten lines covers one inch space in our wide columns. Larger advertisements by 
the year will be taken at a liberal deduction. The above are net rates; and when advertisers 
deal with us through agents their commission must be added. Unless otherwise agreed upon, 
all advertising is expected to be advance payment, and will only be continued as long as- 
pi-epai<l. Address, 

RKFORMED CHrRCH PrBI^ICATIOlV BOARI>, 

54 A'orth Sixth Street, Ptiilndelphia, Pa> 



The Great $.' LAl.^■s Home a.M) Fashion Magazine ok .Mierica! 

Arthur's Home Magazine for 1870. 

With each successive year the " Home M.\gazine" widens its circle of reaih i-s, and extends 
it*< influence among the people. For 18!9 its subscription largely exceeded that of any other 
year, its acceptance was more cordial, and its interest and excellence more fully ackuowledgefl. 
It speaks to the intellect, the heart, the conscience and the ta.ste of its reader.s, and they cannot 
h<'lp approval. 

For thf year IH70, the Home Magazi.ve will present unu.sual attractions. Among these 
will be 

A new American Society ,^ovel, by Virginia F. Town.send, one of the best writers of 
fiction in America. 

A HericH of powerfully written Stories by the author of " Watching and Waiting." 

A HerleH of Tempernnee Talen for the Times, by the author of "Ten Nights in a Bar- 
Room," and other weU-kiiown writers. 

A xeriex of l>»in«'Htic and Social ]Vovelettc« and Stories, of high interest and the 
purest Rn<l most clevatinjc character, by some of our best writers. For stories of this class the 
Home .VlAfiAZINi: has always been lui'-eininent. 

A series of strongly written l*apers on Woman's >Vork and Woman's Wages, by 
an AnK-rican Woinan ol large < xixrience. 

.narvels of the Insect World .\ .series of highly interesting and instructive articles. 

aecoinpanied ]t\ ten splciidiil Inll-pa^'c illustrations. 

Fashions.— A trrcal \aiictvoi illusi nit ions of Fa.shion, with descriptions of the prevailing 
styles ot ilress, will be giv<ii in' c\ erv iniiid)er. Also i)atterns for needle work and fancy articles. 

A .\ew Cookery Kook We shall give our readers, during the year lijiTO, the whole of a 

new volume on Domestic Kconoiny and the .\rt of Cookery, prepared for ns by a lady of fine 
literary ta.stes, and large cxpi'iience in household matters. 

tiardening for Ladles .\ new DcpartniiMit. which will be in the hands of a person of 

long experience, who will yrive eveiv mouth i)raelieal hints on the culture of flowers, plaids, 
vines, and creepers, and their proper care and arrangement, not only in the garden, but in the 
tast«-ful decoration ul the house and verandah. 

ffSTlie large circulation of the • Home Magazine" in families makes it a most desirable 
medium for advertising. Terms: *2 a year; 3 copies, one year. $.5; 4 copies, sfil; S copies and 
one extra to getterup of club, $\i; 1.') copies and one extra, $20. 

Specimen Nt;.MnER Fifteen Cents. 

T. S. ARTIH R & SOXS. 
NO» <&. Mil Chestnut St.. Philndelphla. l>a. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



227 



TIIK AMERICAN lT]VIO]W. ] 

Pi'HLiSHEi) Weekly, at Sidney, Iowa, 
By J. A. BODENHAMER, Editor and Piopiiet'r. 

Tlie Best l,ocal Paper iii Fremont County. 

" Special " advertisements, on the first page, 
10 cents a line eacli insertion. Other rates given 
on applieatioji to the publisher. 

Geo. p. Uowell & Co., Agents, New York. 

THE AUBtJR^T TIMES. 

Official Paper of DeKalb County. 

EMORY HIG1>KY, Editor and Publisher. 
M. IIIGLEY. Proprietor. 

Auburn, Indiana. 

Rates of .VDVEitnsiECi — Local Notices ten 
cents per line for the first insertion, and a cents 
per line for eacli additional insortion. One 
square, the space of ton lines, fl, and 50 cents 
for each addtional insertion, for one month. 

BEIVTOIV TRIBTJJVE, 

Published Weekly by D. R. Luca.s, 
At Oxford, Benton County, Indiana. 

Terms of .Advertising: 

1 w. 2 \v. 1 m. :i m. (> m. 1 vr. 

One inch, $100 $l-2r, 1175 $4 00 $:; 50 $10 00 

Two inches, 1 50 2 00 2 50 G 00 10 00 15 00 

1-4 col., 3 00 3 50 4.50 8.50 14 00 20 00 

1-2 col., 5 00 5 75 7 25 14 00 20 00 30 00 

Column, 8 00 10 00 12 00 20 00 34 00 50 00 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York. 

THE TIMES, 

Dardanelle, Arkansas. 



ELDORA I.KUCiER. 

Published every Friday Morning, .at 
Eldora, Hardin Co.. Io%va. 

R II. .McBKIDK, Kditor and PROPRIETOR. 

Advertising Rates : 

1 w. 4 w. 3 ni. ti ni. 1 yr. 

1 square. -$100 $ i .50 $5 00 $« 00 $12 00 

1-4 col., - GOO 10 00 15 00 25 00 35 00 

1 col., - 15 00 25 00 40 00 GO 00 100 00 



u. 



McCONNELL, EDITOR AND Proprietor. 



Official paper for the Counties of Johnson, 
Newton, Pope, Searcy and Yell. 

Advertisements inserted at low rates. Orders 
solicited. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York. 



BRIDGEPORT EVEIVII¥G FARMER, 

ISSUED DAILY. 
REPFBI.IC^\JV FARMER, 

ISSUED WEEKLY. 
Ponieroy, Gould &, Co., Publishers, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Daily Advertisiuj^ Rates : 

1 inch, 1 time, $1; 1 month, $5; 3 months, $10: 
6 months, $1G; 1 year, $25. 

Weekly Advertising Rates : 

1 inch, 1 week, $1 ; 1 month, $2 ; 3 months, $5; 
6 months, $9; 1 year, $10. 



AMHERST GAZETTE, 

AMHERST, NOVA SCOTIA. 

J. Albert Black, Editor and Proprietor. 



THE GEAUGA DEMOCRAT, 

LS PUBLISHED AT 

CHARDON, (iEAUGA COUNTY, (^HIO, 

BV J. O. CO.WEKSE. 

.\DVERTisiNG Rates— 1 inch. I week, $1; 
monlh, $2 .50; 1 year, .$10. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co , Agents, New York. 



EI,L,ICOTT CIT\ TIMES. 

J O II N R . B R O \\ N . Publisher, 
EUicott City, Md. 

ADVERTiSix(i Rates.— One square (n lines), 1 
insertion, $1; 2 insertions, $1 ."w; anil 25 cents 
for each subsequent insert ion. Advertisements 
payable upon first inseition. 

J>fATI03fAI., EA«iI.E, 

Published at Claremont, N. II. 
ARTHUR CHASE, Editor and Proprietor. 
Terms of Advertising.- For a square occu- 
pying the space of ten lines, and all nnder, $1 
for three insertions, and 30 cents for each adili- 
tional insertion. 

VAr,I.E\ STAR. 

Published at Martinspurg, W. Va. 

The business nuin's paper. Patronized by 
solid men generally. Conservative in politics. 
CHAMBERS & EICHELBERGER, 
Editors and Proprietors. 

THE .EGIS A3fD IIVTELLIGEACER. 

F. W. Baker, Publisher, 
BEL AIR, M A R Y L AND. 

Advertising.— One col., 3 moe., $22; 6 nios., 
$30; 12 mos., $60; 1-2 col., 3 mos., $13; 6 mos., 
$22; 12 mos., $3G; I inch, 3 mos., $2; 6 mos., $3^ 
12 mos., $5. 

THE DAII.Y riVIO]* AlVD UIVIOIV DEM- 
OCRAT, 

Issued every Tuesday morning, 
CAMPBELL & HANSCOM, PUBLISHERS. 

Manchester, IV. H. 
Geo. P. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York. 

VAliIiEV HERAIiD, 

Published Weekly at Chaska, Minnesota, 
By T. E. DUTOIT. 

Advertisements inserted for $1 per square, 
first insertion; one column, $80 per year; half 
column, $4.5; quarter column, $25. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York. 

THE NEW ATHENS ERA. 

PUBLISHED AT 
NEW ATHENS, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ILL., 
is one of the best papers for advertisers to be 
found in Southern Illinois; one col., one year, 
$100; half col., $i;o. Address 

EDWARD FEGAN, Pub'r, New Athens, 111. 



Only paper in Cumberland County; exten- . 
sive circulation and advertising patronage. 

Advertising Rates : i 

One col., 1 year, $15; half col., $25; quarter, 
col., $14; special notices. .50 per cent extra. ' 
Good facilities for plain ami ornamental job 
printing. 



ADVERTISER'S GAZETTE. 

A MAGAZINE OF INFORMATION INTERESTING TO 
ADVERTISERS AND PUBLISHERS. 

Issued Quarterly. ."iO Cents per Annum. 

GEO. P. ROWELL & CO , Publishers, 
New York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The New York Mercantile Journal 



JHEBCHAIVT!!*', .nAI^UFACTlREKS', AXD BAIXHERS' L,E»«KK. 



THE JOUBIVAX, IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY (THURSDAY MORNING), GIVING THE MOST 
Extensive and Accurate Price liists ever Published in the United States, occupying 
Seventeen (17) Columns, together ^vith Sixteen Columns and up>vards of Reading 
aiatter Every Week. It is Strictly neutral in politics, but independent in its criticisms on all 
matttrs affecting the Commercial and Financial interests of the nation. Prices are corrected 
weekly up to the hour of publication, making the Journal almost indispensable to all dealers 
in 5Stocks, Government Bonds, Dry Goods, Drugs, Paints, Oils, Groceries, Country Produce, 
Hardware, Iron, Steel, Tin, Metals, Furs, Skins, Wools, Hides, Leather, etc. It is devoted to the 
interests of bona fide Merchants, Manufacturers and Bankers, and at all times refuses the use of 
its^columns to the advertising of humbugs of any kind. 

There is not a Mercantile or other paper published in the United States so well calculated to 
ajdvance the interests of all who desire to do business with Merchants and Manufacturers 
t hroughout the Union. No other paper reaches so many business men. 



ADVERTISING PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



UOOI> SCBSTArVTIAt, HOUSES ONLY 



S.EVERY BUSINESS MAN SHOULD HAVE 

THE ]VE>V VORK MERCAIVTII.E JOURNAL. 

NONE CAN AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT IT. 



JBUBSCBIPTIOIV PRICE, - - - Five Dollars per ^ijinuni, in Advance^ 

Single Copies, TcJi Cents. 



aa-;,All orders, remittances, and communications must be addressed, 

THE IVEW YORK MERCAIVTIL.E JOURIVAIi, 

THo. »50 Pearl Street 
X POST-OrFICE BOX, 1,919 NEW YORK CITY. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 229f^ 



The Dry Goods Journal, 

— 01{^ 
DEPARTMEWT ::VO. 1 OF THE :WEW YOUK MERCA]VTir.E JOURNAI* 

[ESTABLISIIKII 18(i.'5J, 

IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AND CONTAINS EXTENDED QUOTATIONS OF SHEETINGS, 
Shirtings, Prints, Drills, Osnaburgs, Ginghams, Cottonatles, Delaines, Tickings, Denims, Stiipes^ 
Blue Checks, (Orsct Jeans, Kentucky Jeans, Cotton Flannels, Cambrics, Paper Cambi-ics, Lin- 
seys, Silesias, Sackings and Repellants, Spool Cotton, Hoop Skirts, Crash, Worsted Braids, 
Shawls, Balmoral Skirts, Bags, Cotton Yarns, Baits, Carpet Warps, Twines, Waddings, Carpets^ 
Cotton, Wool, &e., &c. te>i-i« 

The Dry Goods Jonrual also contains Stock Exchange Quotations, and more than ten 
columns of carefully written Financial and Commercial Articles and Market Reviews in eacb- 
number. 

Subscription Price, Two Dollars and Fifty Cents per Year, Payable in Advance. 

Address THE »KY GOODS JOURIVAL,, 

350 Pearl Street, IVew TorU City. 

POST-OFFICE BOX 1,919. 



The Grocers^ Price Current, 

— OR^ 
DEPARTMEjVT ]V0. a of the IVEW YORK MERCANTILE JOITRIVAI* 

[Established in 1803], 

IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AND CONTAINS THE MOST COMPLETE AND ACCURATE Quo- 
tations of Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Grain, Flour, Hemp, Cotton, Tobacco, Hay, Straw, Flax, Hops, 
Tallow, Provisions, Seeds, Foreign and Domestic Fruits and Nuts, Teas, Sugars, Coffees, Syrups, 
Molasses, Ship-Bread and Crackers, Fish and Salt, and other grocery goods; Poultry and Game, 
Furs, Skins, &c., Wool, Hides, Leather, &c., &c. 

The Grocers' Price Current also contains carefully written reports on Financial Affairs 
and a general Review of the Markets, from week to week; also Stock Exchange quotations 
and from ten to fifteen columns of reading matter, treating on subjects of importance relative 
to commercial affairs. 
Subscription Price, Two Dollars and Fifty Cents per Tear, Payable in Advance. 

Address THE GROCERS' PRICE CURREIVT, 

350 Pearl Street, IVew York City. 

POST-OFFICE BOX 1,919. 



The Hardware Price Current, 

-OR— 
DEPART^IESTT IVO. 3 OF THE IVEW YORK MERCAIVTIEE JOURIVAI. 

[Established 186.3 J, 

IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AND CONTAINS COMPLETE QUOTATIONS OF HARDWARE, 
Iron (Bar and Pig), .Steel, Tin, Metals, &c., &c. 

The Hardware Price Current also contains Stock Exchange quotations and from twelve 
to fifteen columns of Financial and Commercial matter of special interest to the Hardware 
trade. 
Subscription Price, Tw^o Dollars and Fifty Cents per Y'ear, Payable in Advance. 

Address THE HARDWARE PRICE CURREBIT, 

a.'iO Pearl Street, ]Vew York City. 

POST-OFFICE BOX 1,919. 



The Druggists^ Journal^ 

— OR— 
DEPARTItlElVT WO. 4 OF THE ]VE^V YORK MERCAlVTItiE JOtTRlVAI> 

[Established ]8()3], 

IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AND CONTAINS THE MOST COJrPLETE QUOTATIONS OF DRUGSv 
Dye Stuffs, Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Petroleum, &c., <&c. 

The Di-u"^ists' Joui-nal also contains Stock Exchange quotations and carefully written 
editorials on Finance and Trade, with extended Market Reviews in each weekly issue. ' 

Subscript'oi. ^ rJ e. Two Dollars an<l Fifty Cents per Year, Payable in Advance. 

Aa-.ie>r.S THE DRFGGISTS* .lOrRTVAI., 

^^,.,^^. . U.-iO Pearl Street. We w York City. 

POSlOiti'oE BOX 1,919. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER R A IK-BOOK. 



THK I.AN( ASTKU INTKr.I.IiiKNc KK 

The Daily Intelligencer 



IS PUBHSHEI) KVKUY K\ KM\(., slNDAVs K.\( 



AT l.ANCASTKK, PA. 



anrl is distributed by aj^cnts in tlie nuuicroiis .summiidiiitj towns sind villn.iires. 

THE n'KKKLiY IXTEL,L,I«K.\<'KR, 

IS PUIJLISHEL) EVERY WEDNESDAY MOKMXG, 

and is sent by mail to every Post-office in Lancaster county, and to many other offices in every 
counti,- in tlie state. 

Tin- Daily and Weelcly editiou.s reach entirely ditTerent elasse.-, of readers. The IVTELLI- 
GEXCKi;, lir-t is.sucd in ITiH, is the most wilcly known and influential journal in the interior of 
Penll^.\ Uania. It is published in a city of 30 '0 and in a county of 175,010 population. It is the 
only DeiiKicratic newspaper in the Democratic city of Lancaster, and speaks for the l!i,(iOO Demo- 
cratic \ (ii('r.~ ol the county. 

KrsisK.ss .Mi;\ can fiml no more certain mediums of communication with the people of 
Eastern Penn-iylvania than are alTorded by the Daily anil Weekly editions of the Intki.i.I(;knckk. 

AI>VERTISIIV« RATES : 

One insertion in either edition 7 1-2 cents per line; subsequent insertions in either edition 
each 4 cents per line. 

SPECIAL, RATES: 

two montlis, $lu; three 



months. SiO, six monihs ,52s ; '.r-' 
months $'i three montn.s, ^b, six 



';; three months, $1 2.3; six month.s, 



Dailt: One square (ten lines of solid nonpareil) one month, $7 
months, $12; six months, $18; one year, $28. 
► t Two squares, one month, $12;'two months, $17; tlire 
year, $14. Each additional square, one month, $1; iw 
months, $8; one year, $12. 

Weekly: One square, one month, $2; two months, $; 
$7; one year, $12. Each additional square, one n,onth, $1 5; two months, $2 50; thi-ee months, 
$.3 2.5; six months, $.»; one year, $8. A daily column contains 210 lines, and weekly column, 33^ 
lines. Special notices precedipg marriages and deaths are charged one-half additional to the 
rates. Advertisements or notices not inserted in reading matter. Cuts charged an extra rate. 

THE IIVTELililGEIVCER JOB OFFICE 

Is prepared to do every variety of Baok mid Joli Work in tlie best style at very 

Low Riite^. 




THE OIT-F-TCIAT. OTtG^AN OF THK ORDER. 

This popular Majrazine entered upon its ninth year in January, 1870, when it was mti- 
terially enlarfred and improved. Its contents embrace first-class original atriries ; instructive 
payjers on science and art ; sprightly sketches of travel ; pithy articles on a great variety 
of subjects; ladies' depart nient ; youths' department; choice poetry, entertaining mis- 
cellany ; together with a complete record of tlie condition and progress of the Order 
throughout the world— giving more information of interest to the fraternity than all the 
other Odd Fellow publications combined. Two volumes a year. Terms, $2 50 i)er year, 
or $1.25 ])er volume. Clubs at reduced rates. Local and traveling agents wanted every- 
where. Send for circulam aiid s|)(-ciin<'n copies. Address, 

P.O. Box 4217 New York City. JOII.N' W. ORR, l>ubli!«li«-r. 



AMERICAN NEVVSPArER RATE-BOOK. 331 

The New York Atlas, 

Kst«blisUed 1S3.«*. 

AlVJSOlV IIKRRICK'S SOWS, Proprietors, 
Office, IVo. 16 Spruce Street. 

Sent by mail at $3 50 per annum ; siTveil by Newsmen in New York and adjacent cities and 
towns at Five <'eiits per single copy and sold by Dealers everywhere. 

ADVKKTISEME.^TS : 

Ten lines, one time, $1 5i); two times, $2 oO; tliree months, $7 50; one year, $30. 
SrECi.vL NOTICKS.— Eij^hteen cents per line for first publication, and two-thirds of that price 
for each .subsequent insertion. 

BisiNESS Notices. — Twenty cents per line for each insertion. 
Minor Editori.\l Noticks"— Thirty cents per line for each insertion. 

The Sunday Democrat, 

A >VEEKt,Y JOtJRiVAIi OF IVEWS, POliITICS AlVD 1,ITERATURB. 
». P. CO:VY]VGHAM, Editor. 

OFFICE. No. 117 NAS.SAU STREET, NEW YORK. 

Snb.scriptlou Rates— Invariably in Advance ; 

Mail Subsciiibek.s— .Single copies, one year, $2 .50; six months, $1 50; four month.s, $1. 

Advertising Rates ; 

One square (12 lines) one month, - - - - - - - -$300 

' ine square, three months, -- - - - - - - __8oo 

One square, six months, - - - - - - - -15 00 

One square, one year, _______ --25 00 

RICHARD WALTERS & CO., Publishers and Proprietors. 

4®- All communications to be addressed to the Editor. 

The Kansas Farmer. 

(liEORGE T. AWTHOJVY, Editor and Publisher. 

Published Monthly, t.t Dklawake .Street, Leavenworth, Kansas, 
devoted to 
THE FAR.n, TIIK SHOP, AIVD THE FIRESIDE. 

Ad%-ertisiug Rates : 

1 mos. 2 mos. ;5 mos. 4mos. 5 nios. (! mos. 9 mos. 12 moa 

1 c-.lumn. - - $15 00 $'.0 00 $tO 00 $4(5 00 $.-iSOi $70 (M) $95 00 $125 00 

3-t '• - i:5 00 2 ! 00 ;55 00 43 00 .->! 00 00 00 85 00 100 00 

2-.3 '■ - -11 00 22 00 ;^i> 00 IV, 00 40 (.0 50 00 75 00 87 00 

1-2 " - 10 00 2 J 00 25 00 ;J0 00 :{5 00 40 00 65 00 75 00 

l-'i " - - ti 00 1« 00 20 00 2t 00 27 00 ;50 00 50 00 .58 00 

1-4 " - 00 12 00 15 110 18 00 20 00 22 00 ;34 00 40 00 

Less than one-quarter of column, 2 i cents per line (nonpareil.) for eacli insertion. 

(iEO. P. KowELL & Co., Advertising .\grnts,40 Park Row, .New Ym-k. 



The raorth Star, 

PIRLISHED SE.MI-MOATHLY AT WIiVO]¥A, MIIVIVESOTA, 

By the ^oi-th Star Priutiitg Company. 





ADVE18TlSI.\<i RATES: 










1 square, - 
3 


2 wks 4 wks. ;5 mos. (i mos. 1 yr. 

- $0 5 1 §0 75 !?2 GO $ .•! 00 $1 00 

- ir, 1 00 2 .-)0 4 00 • 

- 1 00 1 50 ;j 50 5 00 8 01 


2 wks. 
1-4 col., ?1 2.". 
1-2 " 2 00 
1 " 3 00 


4 wks. 

$2 00 

4 00 


3 mos. 
$4 00 
10 
10 00 


6 mos. 
$« 00 
10 00 
17 00 


1 year. 

$10 00 

17 00 

30 00 



ONE inch of Sl'ACE .AIAKES ONE SQUARE. 
The Iiargest Paper Published by Boys in the IVest. 

jg^ Advertising rates che.aper than any other paper in the state. 
Subscription Rates— One copy, three months, 2;} cents; one copy, six months, .50 cents; one 
copv, I year, $1; five copies, one vear, $4; ten copies, one year, $7; flfreen copies, one year, $11; 
tweii.y copies, one year, $13. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Printing Material 

OK EVEUV I>I>CUI1"TI<IN 
FrRl«ISHKl> AT MA:vrFACTl'KKRS' PRICKS. 

S K N D r (J R TERMS. 
CEO. P. ROWELL & CO., 40 PARK ROW, ]\EW YORK. 

The Merchant $t General Advertiser 

IS PrULISIIEO EVERY EKIIJAY M0R:XI:VG at the west in ItllA.lI PRIATIA« 
AJVO PrBLISHIAC HOrSE, King Street, Bowmanville, Ontario. 

THE MERCHANT is the best advertising medium lor tlie Townships of Darlington, Clarke, 
Cartwright and Man vers. 

RATES OF AOYERTISIXC : 

For 1 year, 1 column, $:5.5; half column, $19; quarter column. $10. 

Transient Advertisements — Five cents per line for the first insertion, and two cents per 
lino for each subsequent insertion. Those who use a whole column can have their advertise- 
ments changed four times a year if they ~wish it. 



The Lyceum Banner. 

THE 0:Vt,Y I.IBERAE 3IAGAZi:VE FOR YOFAG PEOPLE EV THE WORLD. 

PUBLISHED OX THE FIRST AXD FIFTEENTH OF EACH MONTH. 
Mrs. H. F. M. BBOW'JV, Editor. E. T. BLACKMER, Associate Editor. 

Rates of Advertising— Each line of nonpareil type, 10 cents per line for the first, and eight 
cents per line for every subsequent insoition. For all advertisements on second page of cover ,- 
ornext to last page of reading matter, ).■) cents per line for the first, and twelve cents per line 
for every siibsequent insertioii. Address 

EOr H. KIMBAEE. Publisher, 
I:t7 1-2 31i)(lison Street. Room ^(4, Cliicago, 111. 





New Era, 








PrBEISIIEI> \YEEKt,Y AT SAVAX.ITAH, MISSOURI, 








By J. E. IirSTOX, Editor and Proprietor. 






1 inch, 

2 inches, 
.S inches, 
4 inches. 


1 w. 2 w. 4 w. .3 m. O m. 1 vr. i 1 w. 2 w. 4 w. 3 m. 
$1.W $2 00 $2 80 $7 00 $10 00 $15 00 | 1-4 col., $'i 00 $7 50 $10 . TO $15 50 
.3 00 4 00 5 50 10 (X» 1.3 00 17 00 1-2 col., it 00 12 00 15 50 ii 00 

4 00 5 20 7 00 12 0:) 15(H) 20 00 1 col., 14 00 17 00 22 00 :» 00 

5 20 G 70 it 50 hi (to IS .50 25 00 


6 m. 

$20 00 

:14 00 

50 (to 


lyr. 

$27 00 
50 00- 
75 00 


Geo. 


P. RowELL & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 







The Art Journal, 

AJV .\.>IERICAIV REYIEW OF THE FIIVE ARTS. 

PUJHJSHEI) .MONTHLY. P.V .1. F. AITKEN & CO., AT OPERA HOUSE ART GALLERY 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 

TeririK: Four l»oIlars per .\iiiiuin. 



The Eutaw Whig and Observer. 

pri'.LisMKD w l•;l:Kl,^ at ki'i'aw. .\i. \r,.\.\iA, 

By W. O. Ml'lN'ROE, ------- Editor imd l*ropriet< 

AiivEi{TisKMi;\'i> iNM;irii:i) in a tastekil and CoN.-^PK lOl s M.VNNK1{ 

<tN KWOKAHI.E TERMS. 
OFFICIAI. PAPER OF THE COl'^TY. 

^.^:<»il.\. \'. I{<.\\ i l.l, .V <<>.. Auenls. Hi Park Row, New York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Jefferson Democrat. 



LIVELIEST COlTi^TRY PAPER IN MISSOURI. 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN THE SOUTH PART OF THE STAT] 



PiiblisUed Every Friday in tlie Ulasonlc Hall Building, Hillsboro, :»Io. 



$•2 Per Annum. 



Advertising Rates : 

One square (ten lines) one insertion, - $1 00 j Letters of Adniinistration, - - - $3 50 

Each subsequent insertion, - - - 50 i Final SetUrnicnt. 3 00 

Cue square, one year, 10 00 Estray Ndticcs, - - - -, - - 2 50 

Quarter coluuin, one year, - - - 25 00 Local Xotices per line, 10 

Half " " .... 4000 Editorinl Notices, per line, - - . 20 

One " " ... 80 00 I 

FRAIVH N. STOXE, Editor and Proprietor. 



JOB PRLXTIIVG. 



The Democrat office is prepared to print, with neatness and dispatch, and in a workman- 
like manner, all kinds and styles of 

^PLAIiV OR FANCY BOOH AlVD JOB PRIXTlWtt, 

at St. Louis Prices and in St. Louis style. Having been to great expense in fitting up our Job 
Department with New and Fancy Styles of Wood Type, we make a specialty of Poster Printing. 
Plain or in Colors. The custom of the county is respectfully solicited. 

Call, or address all orders to 

FRAJVH jX. stone, Hillsboro, Mo. 



234 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



IVEW A>I» VALUABLrK AOVEKTISIXCi MEDIUM. 




Jl;\\n'iim>^^\>A\>KH 







uv 



]^LW^u[\i^'^i{oivr 



A POPILAK PAPER OF Pt-EASl'RE A^TD PROFIT. 

A II \l.K-m\IK I'APKli <1F OHIGIN-AL AND KN'TKKTAINING LlTKIJAXntK. 
H will B^-coine tUe First Clioice of Readers of Popular Literature. 

THE SATITRDAY JOrKilTAL, 

Has a large and rapidly-iucreasing circulation, and as its advoi-tisiTig spaco is limited to two 
©olumns, it offers a splendiil medium to general advertisers. 

ADVERTISI^« RATEJ* : 

Fifty Cents per T^iiie. ^Vonpareil Spaee. 
All orders slioul.l hv addro.ss.'d, 

BEAOEE <fc <'0.MPA:VV, Publishers, 

IVo. «N ^Villiam .Street, :Vew York. 

I >I !• O II T .1 A T TO .4 I» \ !•: It T I S E R » . 
THE .^ORTH-WESTERIV 

Agricultural and Horticultural Journal. 

ITIiLl^HK!) MONTIII.V AT ^IILWAIKKK. \V1s('.n^in. 

<'iK«i i.ATioA' i^.ooo <opn:**. 

It is the O -ily tiirmiu A:;rirullui-al I'aper l*ul*nsheil West of I^ew York. 



All A I vT wisi: tu .-ommunioate direct Willi ilii- luimiro'.is (icriiiaii Farmers, Gardeners, Ac., 
oat Wo.- fconduicrcd by dealcis in .\griciillmal Iiiii)l(iiiciit.s and otluMs ms among their Ixist eu8- 
tojiers. can find no better medium than the North-Wiv-tern Agriculiund .loiirnal. II eireulate* 
12,000 coj'ies 111 Illlnoi.'*, Iowa, Minnesota. Miiliigan, and Wisconsin. 

For low 1 Iv rllsing rate?., -iifcinien euiiics, and oUn-r inlVuniation, aililress 

W. \\. <OI^E.MAi>, 
Piibli-lK r of .\»i1li-AV< stern .\;;rleultural .lournal, 

.Milwaukee, IVlsconsiu. 



AMERICAN NEVV8PAPER RATK-BOOK. 



PKOSPEUTUS FOR 1S7(). 
rVOU' IS THK TIMK TO SIBSCRIBK 

The Fireside Companion^ 

The Il.iiidsomest, .^ost Kiitertiiiiiiiig. Inst i-iictive ami AJjiy t'oiidiictf il Paper in the 

^Vorld. 

l>I>:VOTI<:i> TO FACT A1VI» FIfTIOIV. 

Ill its oohimiis will l)i' foiiud iiiany invaluable treasures in the domain of 

ROMANCE, POETRY, HISTORY, ADVENTURE, WIT, HUMOR, 

Ana, in fact, a choice variety of gems in evcx-y department of literature likelj- to interest each 
m'ember, young or old, of the family circle. 

Price, in IVe^v York, _ _ _ _ 6 Cents per Copy. 



One ol tne most /aluable peculiarities of the Fireside Companion is, that while many of 
the stories are written with a view to general interest alone, the young folks are not forgotten. 
During the torthcoming year, some of the most admikaisle tales that moxbv can pkocukb, 
■exclusively for the amusement and instruction of children, both boys and girls, will appear in 
its columns, arrangements having been ni:i le with several celebrated authors to supply a series 
•of " continued" and short stories, in theh- -o\oral happiest styles, and under the heading 

" READIIVK FOR tITTL,E FOIiKS," 

A splendid piece will be published every wfeik an^l wi. ,"ii aion-" will be worth more than the 
price of the paper. 

Although the Fireside Companion has but jusi e.i'e'ed upon its t ii;_-.; vcnv, it stands in the 
v'BRV FIRST RAVK of family papers. This proud position has been aehicvtv: .y the excellence 
■of its illustrations and stories (the production of the best artists and .■uithors ii, ;i.e (uiuntry), 
the pleasing, varied nature of the editorials, essays, sketches, poetry, wit, humor, anei.'otea, 
Ac. &c., and the neat, admirable arrangement of the general contents. 



The Corps of Writers for the Fireside Companion 

■Comprises many of the most illustrious and popular names in American Literature, viz. 



Mrs. Sumner Havoen, 
Lucy Rvkdall Comfoht, 
Mary Reed Cuowkll, 
Eva Evergreen-, 
Reuecca Fokijes. 
Britomarte, 
Eva Alice, 

Mary J. Wines, 
J. W. Mackky, 

Waldorf H. Phillii-s, 
Major Almvu, 

W. H NORRI,'- 



Augustin Daily', 
Capt. Carleton, 

CORRY O'LANUS, 

Dr. Jupiter Paeon, 

R<JGER .STARHUCK, 

John H. Nevins, 
Kenward Philp, 

The "Old Trapper," 
John F. Cowan, 
Harry HAZLETf)N, 
W. GiLMORE Sims, 
John Bkoughab 



And many others whom we have not sinice to enuuierato 



The stories in Tlie Fireside ('ompauioii are l)(>tli various and (■oniprehensive, the great 
aim being to present <'ver\- shade of bum ni life. Tlius we have Lueal stories. i;o;-(ler stories, 
Domestic Stories, Sea stories. Tales of \d\i-uture, itr\dluiioii,u-\' stories, Historical Stories, 
Tales of the Supernatural, of Fairies, (ienii, (ihosts, aui'i all tliat is won^lerful and interesting in 
Xature and Art, besides Uuuiov. ms ami Satirical Articles, by Corry O'Lanus, Hattie Hateful, and 
•other famous writers, ou the Whims, oiilities, ami Follies )f the times. 

In fact. The Fireside foiiij 
America, and consequently is the 

IVOW IS THE TIME TO SIT -.CRIBE FOR IT 



TERMS OF THE FIRESlU , COMPANION: 

Single Copy, _ _ _ o Cents i Fonr Copie.s, - - - - .$10 GO 

One Copy, per Vear. - - $» <>0 { A'ine " _ _ _ 30 CO 

And those, sending niu<- suh^eril)er- and $>i) at one lime will lie allowed to add additional 
•copies, at $2 ."iO each. 

.1 limited nnmbir of TJiiobjectio liable .Vilvertiseininls inserted at .50 cents per 
agate line, each insertion. 

The co-operation of Postm.isteis and others in lavor of The Fireside Companion is 
respectfully solicited. 

In ordering, bo careful to give full name and address. 

4iEOR4>E Mri\'RO, Publisher, 

(Post offick J'.ox .i,(i;J7.) 118 William Street, iVew York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



To any Advertiser 



Who desireg to correspond witli Publishers direct, and obtain their Terms, xve 
make an allowance sufficient to cover the cost, including a fail- charjje for Sta- 
tionery, Postage and Clerk Hire, and accept, in all cases, the Terms obtained. By 
this means the Advertiser has the assurance of actually knowing the best he can 
do by direct application to Publishers, and we shall obtain Prices which will 
prove satisfactory to them. >Ve ^vill in all cases allow an Advertiser all the 
I>iscouut or Reduction of Price which the Publisher will promise, and in those 
Papers >vhich promise IVotices or Special Advantages, we ^vill guarantee to secnre 

the same. 

GEORCJE P. ROAVEI.I. &, CO., 

Advertising Agents, 

40 Park Row, IVew York. 

The St. Louis Herald. 

Published Monthly at SI. I^ouis, and Circulated Largely in Missouri, Kansas^ 
Nebraska, Dakotah, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Hentucky, and Other 
IVestern and Southern States. 

CIRCrLATIOIV, - - - - .5,000 COPIES. 

MONTH I. V KXTRA ISSUES, AT TIIK (d'EMNii OK THE TRADE SEASONS OK KROM 
.5,000 TO 10,000 COPIES MONTHLY. 



The St. liouis Herald is ciirct'iilly cililid uihI well luiiitril witli lU'w type on good paper, 
and istho best paper of its kind published in tlir Wist. 

AS AM ADVERTISIIVG MEIHITM 
The Herald is second ti> no other i)ul)lication in the Mississippi Valley, and for the number 
of copies publisheil and value of its distribution it is the cheapest advertiser now before the 
public. 

At the low priee of fifty cents i)er annum to clnbs of five or moiv, or t'lventy-tlve ceut» 
per annum to clubs of forty or more, it is the cheapest newspaper in St. Louis. 
Specimen copies sent free. Address 

ST. I.OIIS HERAI.n, 
72:1 .South Stventli Street, St. I.,ouis, Mo. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 337 



AL, IF AX, IV. 



The Acadian Recorder. 

DAILY AIVD TBI-WEEKr,Y. 

[ESTAULISHKD 1813.] 

Cireulatiou, 1,100. I>aily $5 OO. Tri-^Veekly, ,$« OO. 

BLACKADAB BBOS., Editors and Publishers. 



Royal Gazette. 



(ESTABLISHED 1801. WEEKLY. 

H. W. BLACKADAB, QUEEIV'S PBIIVTER. 

Three Dollars per Aiiuum. 



Journal of Education. 

$1 PEE ANNUM. MONTHLY. 

BliACKADAB BBO!«., Publishers. 

Circulation, 3,3.'>0. 



ADVEBTISIIVG TEBMS : 

The terms for the Boyal Gazette and Daily and Tri- Weekly Becorder are the same 
to wit: 

1 insertion. 10 insertions. 20 insertions. 40 insertions. 60 insertions 

One sciuare (15 lines), $ 1 00 $ 3 00 $ 5 00 # s 00 llO 00 

One-fourth column, - -2 oO 8 00 14 00 21 00 oi nn 

One-half " - - 4 50 15 00 25 00 35 00 40 00 

One " - 9 00 30 00 50 00 70 00 80 00 

One column is fifteen squares. 



The Acadiaii Becorder is the oldest journal in the Maritime Provinces, the Royal 
azette is the official organ of the Government, and the Journal of Education is the official 
j ournal of the Educational Department. 

For subscription, advertising, &c., in these publications. Address 

BL,ACKADAB BBOS., Halifax, Nova Scotta. 



238 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER KATE-BOOK. 



WE WIKL, INSEUT AN ADVEUTISE.MENT 

THIS SIZE 

(space of (ine iiicli). 'MIC y- ir. in .mr-li.iii tli.- iiiwspaper.s pub- 
lisliici in the riiitiil St:iti t > - I X I h ii i \ i;- ,„ r paper; one- 
half the space f<pr ♦'! :' M i v he changed 
monthly. Thelistiiu-I < , circulation of 
each paper from iOO to :." _ i,«in). Full filex 
can he examined at tlii tli ^ ii I i i i portion of the 
|ia|i(r> lit pioportioimte riitc Alsi., tnr D, .■, or a "ingle month. 
I'riiitiil li-t .if the papers sent on receipt ol stamp. Address G. 
]'. K( )\V i;i,l. & C6- Advertising .Agents. 40 Park Row, N. Y. 

American Quarterly Church Review. 

U» V. .I<>II.\ .>!. I.KA\ ITT. Kjlltoi- aiul l»ioi>ii«-tor. 

37 BiBr.K HorsK. .Ssioh Pi.a< k, N. Y. ----- - $:; ("i iKU Annlm. 

A<lvertis«-ineiits Reorived oit I.,ib<-ral Terms. 

The Cngli!«h ClkurcUinaii snys ot tlio Miigaziin' : '• (^iiitc (•(iiial to t lie bt'fit ol our English 

Qu:irt<-i-ly Hcview.s in its litcniry style, and withal cinintiitly oitliodox." 



Earlville Sun. 



Pnbli-lieil Kvcry Tliiirsilny >Ioriiiiig. at l^nilvill*-. I>ela^vare 4'ouuly, lo^va. 

.). A. CULK. ElUTOK AM) ITm.lSUKI!. 
MnlMcription, ...... $2 OO per Annum. 

Geo. p. Howell & Co., Agents, 40 Park Kow, New York. 



The Hancock Weekly Times. 

This paper is Democratic in i)<)litics, and, being the only Democratic paper in the district, i» 
rapidly increasing in circuliition and influence. It istlie best adverti.siiig medium in Delaware 
County, as the most j.ains are taken in disjilaying advertisements and putting them into reatla- 
ble shape, and circulating as it dots in time counties— Delaware and .'^ullivan in New York, and 
Wayne County in i'cnnsylvaiiia— ailvertis(Ms have a peculiar advantage of a wide circulation, 
both in and outside ot the county where published. 

THK UOUGLAS JOlTR]VAr, 

Is published by Mr. S. C. Clizhe, and its published rates of advertising accord with those of 
of the Times. Advertisers will please bear in mind that where advertisements are ordered in 
both of my papers a deduction of '20 per cent, will be made. 

Advertisements intended for either or both papers will be directed to 

TIMi:»(. IlaiK-ock, !V. T. 



Cleveland Cermania. 

A iiirmnii Iteiiiueialle \'«\vsi>ap« r. I'liblUlx <l S«-ml-^V««^klj aii<l ^Vet-Wly, 

ItV II. (.KM/.. AT Cl.KVKI.VM-, (IIIIO. 



It is the largest (ierman ri<\vsi.aii<r in CIi'N eland, has a large eirciilation, and is extensively 
patronized by enterprising and discriininaling advt'rtiseis. 
For advertising rates address the publisher. 
Geo. p. Howell & Co., Agents, 40 Park How. New York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 239 



A DOMESTIC M.\<;AZINK OF ITSEFUL INFORMATION AM) AMUSKMKNT. 



IVIaple Leaves. 



THE BENT! THK >IOST POPHT^AR ! THE CHEAPEST 



MAI'LE I,KAVES IS THK LARGEST CIRCl'LATIXU MONTHLY OF ITS CLASS IN' THE WORLFi. 



In variety of practical, useful, and eutcrluiiiiuiyf reading, it lias noe([ual; its ample* pages 
comprising various departments, including 

Agriculture, ITsefiil and Scientific Articles. Domestic Economy, Papers on Social 

Snbjects, etc., ^vith many Illustrations, Tales, Sketches, 

Enigmas, Rebuses, etc. 



Maple Leaves is a National Magazine, i-ead and admired by men, women, and children, in 
conntry, village and city. It is ably edited, neatly printed, well illustrated, and adapted to 
the whole country. The constant aim is to render it unequaled, both in contents and appear- 
ance. Each number contains twenty-four quarto pages, printed on superior paper, and illus- 
trated by tlie best artists. 



OIVLY FIFTY OEIVTS PER YEAR. FIVE COPIES FOR $'i OO. 



THIS MAGAZINE AVILL BE FOUND 
Alf EXCEIiL-EiVT AWVERTISIIVG MEDITM, 

As it circulates in evei-j- State ami Teriitory of the Union, and the Canadas. 



ADVERTISEMEIVTS 

{ECEIVED THROUGH MESSRS. GEO. P. BOWELL & CO., 40 PARK KOW, NEW YOUK CiTY. 



O. A. ROORBACII. PUBLISHER, 102 UTASSAIT STREET. IVEIT YORK. 



240 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Exposition Journal. 

A COMl'KNDll M OK IMiACTIC AI. INFORMATION IN THE 
ARTS, MlXIfA.^US. MA.irrt ACTIKKS, A<iRIt tlLTlRE, HORTICl LTITRK. ETC. 



-OS 






O oj 



1^1 



2" 




JE^XEIESESiSQ I 




f* (S 



I'LULISIIIM) AT 

THE EXPO»lTlonr, »» AW1> 37 PARK PLACE, ]\EW YORK. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 241 



Trempealeau County Recorder, 



PUBIilSHED EVERT FBIDAT BY A. F. BOOTH & CO. 



A. W. IVEWMAW, A. F. BOOTH, Editors. 



TREMPEAIiEATJ, WISCOIVSIIV. 



SUBSCBIPTIOJV, TWO »Or,I.ABS PER AWWrM. 



LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY COUNTRY NTIWSPAPER IN THE UNITED STATES. 



IW ITS EDITOBIAX BEPARTMEJVT 

THE RECORD ■will continue to advocate the principles of the Republican party. 

ITS ]VETVS BEPARTMEUTT 

Contains all the local intelligence, and a carefully-prepared digest of the latest telegraphic ad- 
vices from all quarters of the globe. 



The above considerations should commend it to advertisers as a medium of communication 
with the intelligent masses ot the West, and with whom trade can be opened in no easier or 
surer manner than through the columns of THE RECORD. 



Advertising Rates furnished on application to the publishers. 

16 



242 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER KATE-BOOK. 



TUE STAR AKn SEIVTIAEI^. 

UETTYSIUKG. I'A. 

IIARPEK, MCl'HEitsoN ."t l!i I iii.i r. PMitors and 
Proprietors. The " Sevtim I "' istuili-lud in 1800— 
the " Star " in 1828— c«H.so/i</(//cf/ Mmj ■.':{, I»i7. A 
Weekly New.spaiu r. ilivolcil to Politics, News, 
Litt'i'iitine und Ajiriful1m-c. 

Tl:(^ "SiAH and sk.niim;i," is the largest. 
paper in tlie Coiigic-sioiial District, and lists a 
larger clrculntioii in Adams and adjoining 
counties of I'ennsylvania and .Maryland, by 
one-half, than ever heretofore attained by any 
journal in the county. 

Geo. p. Koweli- &"Co., Agents, New York. 

westerjV hampdeiv times, 

\Vestfiem>, Mass. 

clark & caupenteh, - publishers. 

Issued Wednesdays, 

At $1 BO per Annum, in Advance. 

Specimen copies sent free on application. 
Rates of Advektisikg : 

1 square 1 year, - $10 I 1-2 col . 1 year - $80 
1-4 col. 1 year, - 50 00 | 1 col. 1 year, - 112 50 



THE I>ICHET. 

ROCKVIEI.K CE.NTEU, EONG ISLAND. 
A Marvel of Success. $1 2.3 per Annum. 

Adveutising Rates: 

One column, S< per year; half column, $10; 
quarter column, $2,"). One column, months, 
$40; 1 column, . 5 months, $25. One square (11-2 
inches) $10 per annum; (> months, $(; .50; 3 
months, $1; 1 time. T.i cents. Editorial notices 
10 cents per line. G. P. Rowell & Co., Agents, 
40 Park Row, N. Y. 

JOHN II. REED, Ed. and Pub'r. 

The cheapest J'aper in the First Congressumal 
District. 

1>EI.AWARE CO. DEMOCRAT. 

Published at Chester, Delaware county, Pa., 
by Dr. J. L. Fouwoou, editor and proprietor. 
a' large S-page i)aper, and only Democratic pa- 
per in Delaware county. Terms of Subscrip- 
tion, $2 per annum, in advance. Advektisi.ng 
Rates: Advirtisements making one, two or 
three squares. 10 cents per line tirst, and 5 cts. 
each subsequent insertion, if inserted for a less 
period than 1 mo. ; 25 per cent, oil" if inserted for 
6 mos., and if inserted for 1 year, 30 per cent, re- 
duction made. Atlvertisementsmakingquarter, 
half, or one column, 40 per cent, reduction al- 
lowed. Ten lines of Nonpareil make 1 square. 



THE RTTRAU SOUTHERIVER. 

SPIRITED AGRICULTURAL MONTHLY. 
Publislied in Atlanta, <ia., 
By Samuel A. Echols. 
Terms : One I>ollar per Annum. 

j9S" Send for specimen copy. 



Established 1834. 

THE MOXMOlTil DEMOCRAT. 

A First-class Weekly .Journal, 32 large columns. 

Published at Freehold, N. J., 
the county seat of Monmouth county, one of the 
wealthiest agricultural counties in the United 
States. Population .^)(i,ii()0. The oflicial paper of 
the county. The largest sheet, the largest cir- 
culation, and the be>l ad\erti-iiiig medium in 
the county. Specimen copies sent free to 
advertisers. Address 

JAS. S. YARD, Publisher. 



DE1V1TT REGISTER. 

Clistox, Illinois. 

Official Paper of City and County. 

BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN CENTRAL 
ILLINOIS. 

Circulation One Thousand. 

(W. L. GLESNER & CO., 

Publishers. 



prBi,ic opiwioiv. 

m. a. foltz, elutou and publlsheu, 

Chamueusuuug, Pa. 

circulation 1,.500. Terms, $1 .lO a Tear. 

No objectionable advertisements inserted. 
Advertisements, when sent dir<!Ct, casli in ad- 
vance. Rates : 1 square, 1 week, $1 ; 3 weeks, 
$1 75; 6 weeks, $2 .50; 3 mos., $1; (i mos., $5 .50; 
1 year, $8; business cards, 5 lines, 1 year, $5; 
quarter col., 1 j-ear, $i"); half col., $40;"one col., 
$70; 10 lines constitute a s(|uare. G. P. Rowell 
& Co., are my authorizcnl New York Advertising 
Agents. M. A. KOLTZ, Cliamber.sburg, Pa. 

IVETEIVDARD .\ATIO,-V.\I.. 

French Wci^kly. TIk- National Organ of tlie 
French Canadians emigrated to this eoiintry. 
Pul)lished ill \\i)rcest"r, Mass. Circulation 
2,.5f/<), in .500 cities ia Ihr United Slates and C.in- 
ada— 'XIO ill .\Ia-is:ichnsr'its; .5">ii in Cnnneclieiit 
and Rliode Island :2H0 in New Uamp-hiri'; too in 
Vermont and Maine; ;!00 in New York and Dela- 
ware; 200 in the Western .states, and the rest in 
Lower Canada. (Jood advertising mcMliuni. 
Geo. p. RowEt.L ."t Co., Agents for New York. 
Subscription, $2 a year. Address 

FERD. GA(;N0N, Editor, 

Worcester, Mass. 



l>Air,T AWD WEEKLT STATE 
GAZETTE, 

TRENTON, NEW JERSEY. 
Daily $6; Weekly $2 per year, in advance. 



The best advertising medium in New Jersey > 
circulating in every township in the State. 

MURPHY & BECHTEL, Proprietors. 



MOUIVT VER:V0JV CHRO]VICl-E. 

Saturdavs; four pages; size 19x2!!; subscrip- 
tion $2; established 18'i9; Joseph S. Wood, 
editor and publisher; circulation 000. 

The only paper published in the village of 
Mount Vcnion and the town of Easiehestcr, 
Westchester Co , N. Y. The only local paper 
circulating in Tuekahoe, Waverlev, Washing- 
tonville, Wakelield, Woodlawn, Chester Hill, 
Bron.wille. West Mount Vernon and Williams' 
Bridge or J.ruiii.- Nii objcel ionable advertise- 
mi'iiis iiisiiird. The p:ipiTwill soon be enlarged 

so as 1(1 conlaiii ciglil pages lixlC. 



Handsomest jirinted iiaper in Indiana. Cir- 
culation 2,050 eo)iics to subscribers who pay in 
ailvance. Twelve columns advertisements; 
twenty columns reading matter. 
Adverti<ing Rates: (J inch constitutes a sgr.) 
1 w. 2 w. .! w. I 'n. 3 ni. <! m. 1 vr. 

1 sqr., $100 $1.50 $2 00 $2 .50 $K)0 $7 00 ^12 

2 " 2 00 2 50 3 00 3.50 7 00 12 00 22 
1-1 col., 3.50 4 0O 5 00 (iOO 15 00 :iO 00 50 
1-2 " 00 8 00 !M)0 10 0(1 ;iO(IO .50 00 90 
1 " 12 00 11(K» IC.Ml 20 IM) .50 00 ilOOO 150 



Atldress 



(iAZETTK. Terre-Haute, Ind. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 248 



The Peninsular Herald. 



PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY, - - - AT DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



liARGEST AND ABIiEST TEMPERAIVCE PAPER PUBLISHEI). 



ADVOCATES THE CLAIMS OF THE NATIONAL PROHIBITION PARTY. LET ALL RADICAL 
TEMPERANCE PEOPLE SEND FOR THIS PAPER. 



SUBSCRIPTIOIV PRICE, TWO I>OIir,ARS PER YEAR. 



Rates of Advertising t 

For one insertion, one square, $3 00 ; for eacli additional squai-e $1 00, and for each additional 
Insertion 50 cents per square. 

For three months : $.i per square. 

For six months : $10 for one square, and $7 50 for each additional square. 
For one year: $20 for one square, and $l.j for each additional square. 
Ten lines of nonpareil coii'^titute a squai'e. 

The Farnham Banner, 

A WEEKLY ENGLISH JOURNAL, PUBLISHED AT WEST FARNHAM, PROVINCE OF 

QUEBEC, CANADA. 

ALSO, 

li'ECHO I>E FARXHAM, A WEEKHiY FRENCH JOURlVAXi, 

Published at West Farnham, Province of Quebec, Canada— both official organs of the district. 



The subscriber calls public attention to the unrivalled facilities he offers for giving increased 
publicity to any business or profession through the columns of his two newspapers— the Banner 
and L'ECHO DE Farnham. The Banner has a large and constantly increasing subscription list, 
thus presenting claims of a superior order on those who wish to bring their profession or busi- 
ness prominently before the wealthy mercantile and farming community of this part of the 
Dominion of Canada. L'Echo de Faknham is a French weekly newspaper, and has a very 
large circulation, and offers unrivalled facilities for advertisers to i-each that numerous class 
of our inhabitants which can be reached in no other way, as it is to be found in almost every 
household ; therefore, with a view of extending tlieir usefulness, he solicits a share of adver- 
tising patronage either for one or both of his journals; with the assurance that it shall ever be 
his aim to further the interests of his patrons. All advertisements translated either English 
into French, or French into English, free of charge, and will be neatly and i^rominently dis- 
played in the columns of either or both of his newspapers. 

S. C. SMITH, West FarnHam, P. Q. 

Rates of Advertisiug : 

Eight cents per line, solid bourgeois, for the first insertion; two cents per line for each 
ubsequent insertion. 



244 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



DEXTER & COMPANY, 

PFBIilSHERS, PKIIVTERS, A:V1> STATIONERS, 

No. 17 SPRUCE STREET (NEAR THE CITY HALL.), NEW YORK; No. 40 PEARL STREET, 

BOSTON; No. 149 SOUTH FOURTH STREET, PHFLADELPHIA ; 
Issue simultaneously in each of tliese cities, the following among other industrial publications : 

The Shoe and Leather Reporter, 

Devoted to the Manufacture and Trade in 

BOOTS AJVD SHOES, LEATHER, FIIVDIIVGS, HARNESS, HIDES, 

SKINS, WOOIi, FURS, TANiVING MATERIAXS AJVD 

COLEATERAt, BRANCHES. 



SEMI-WEEKLY, 



- - - - SEVEN DOLLARS PER ANNIDI, 

(Or, Six Dollars, Strictly in Advance.) 



WEEKLY, _----_- FOUR DOLLARS PER ANNUM, 

(Or, Three Dollars and a Half, Strictly in jVdvance.) 



Half square, 
One 

Two " 
Three " 
Four " 



3 mos. 

$7 00 
12 00 
22 00 
32 00 
42 00 



TERMS OF ADVERTISING: 

l7i either the Semi-weekly or Weekly. 

3 mos. 
Five squares, - $52 00 
Six " - 62 00 

Quarter column, 72 00 

- 128 00 

- 1{»8 00 



6 mos. 

$12 00 
21 00 
38 00 
54 00 
70 00 



12 mos. 

$22 00 
35 00 
60 00 
84 00 

108 00 



Half 
One 



6 mos. 
$86 00 
102 00 
118 00 
216 00 
370 00 



12 mos. 

$132 00 
1,t6 00 
180 00 
3!M 00 
600 00 



Half square, per line, 
One " " 



TRANSIENT ADVERTISEMENTS : 

20c. I Two squares, per line, - $0 15 | Half column, 
18c. I Quarter column. 



15 : 
8 00 I ( 



$14 00 
26 00 



Business Notices, 30 cents per line, each insertion. The space of ten lines of agate solid 
ie a square. 



FOR 
HARNESS AND CARRIAGE JOURNALr, 

I'uifLisHKD Weekly, 



JOURNAL. OF AP1»EIED CHEMISTRY, 

I'UDLisHED Monthly, 



See next page. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 245 



The Harness and Carriage Journal. 



DEVOTED TO THE MAUFACTURE AND TRADE IN 

HARIVJBSS, CARRIAGES, TRUilTKS, COACR AIVD SADDI.ERT HARDWARE, 
ACCOUTREMEIVTS, &c. 

Wkeklt, Four Dollars Per Annum, or Three Dollars and a Half Strictly in Advance. 



THE 1»TH VOlilTME COMMEIVCE© IIV A NEW DRESS AVG. 1, 1869. 

It now consists of twelve quarto pages, in form suitable for binding, with illustrations, 
working models for mechanics, &c. 

The Terms of Advertising in the Harness and Carriage Journal are the same as in the 
Shoe and Leather Reporter; but advertisements especially ordered for the First Page are 
charged three times these rates; on the Last Page double, and on the Second Page 50 per 
sent, additional. 



The Journal of Applied Chemistry. 



DEVOTED TO CHEMISTRY AS APPLIED TO THE ARTS, MANUFACTURES, AGRICULTURE, 
METALLURGY, &C. 

Monthly, Two Dollars Per Annum, or One Dollar and a Half Strictly in Advance. 

THE 5TH VOLFME COIMEiVCED JAN. 1, 1870. 

Terms of Advertising : 



„ ,, 3mos. 6mos. 1 year. 

Half square, - - $4 $6 $10 

One square, . . 7 ^0 lii 

One square and a half, 10 14 22 

Two squares, - - 12 17 -m 

Two and a half squares, 14 20 .30 

Three squares, - - 10 23 34 

Three and a half squares, 18 20 ,38 

Four squares, - - 20 29 42 

Four and a half squares, 22 32 46 



3 mos. 6 mos. 1 year. 

Five squares, - - $24 $35 $50 
Five and a half squares, 20 38 54 

Six squares, - - 28 41 58 

Six and a half squares, 30 44 62 

Seven squares, - - 32 47 66 

One column, - - 50 75 105 

Two columns, - - 90 13.5 180 

Three columns, - - 130 195 2.55 

One page, - - 170 255 330 



„ „^ „, „^ „^ ^, \^ue page, - - iii) iJ55 33O 

Special.— On first or last page, 100 per cent, extra; on second page, 50 per cent, extra. 
Transient Rates.-First or last page, 60 cents per line; inside pages, 30 cents per line; 
second page, 45 cents per line. 

Dexter & Company also devote special attention to »Iercantile Printing of every kind. 

OFFICES : 17 Spruce Street, New York ; 40 Pearl Street, Boston ; 149 Soutb 
FoMrtU Street, Philadelphia. 



246 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

The Fort Wayne Journal 

IS ITHMSIIIl) KVKliV SAirKDAy, 

By Tno.MAS S. TAYLOK & CO., Fort Wayne, Allen Coimty, Indiana. 

TERMS : $2 I'l'At ANNUM. CIRCULATION, 1,000 COPIES. 

Kates of Adverti.tin;;: One inch of snac-c in lengtli of column constitutes a square. Lib- 
rral terms witlitlio^(! who advertise \)y tlie quarter, half column orcolumn. 

The Joui-nal is the hir.ui'si paper, has the larfie.st circulation, and is read by the t;rea1est 
number of pe()i)h> of any publication iu Allen county. It needs no better reconiuiendation 
than the followiuji notice, laKcn irom Vice-1're.sideut Colfax's old ncw.spaper, the South Ilend 
(Ind) /i'C(?/.<^'r, dated Deci'mbcr Jii, IS'fl: " * * * The ./o?<rna/ is neatly printed, intcrestinjj: iu 
lis reading;: matter, and, with the experience Mr. Taylor has hatl in Ihe pulMishing business, can- 
not fail to IxH'imic a vahi;il>lc and successful journal. Fort Wayne h;is h)nK needed a weekly 
that will take care of her h)cal iutcre.-^ts, auil now has one in the ./<»u-;i«?, which should be sus- 
tained by a libcM-al iialrona^c " And also Ihe followinpr, from the dailv Iirmnrrat of same date : 
" * * *" Mr. Taylor's hirjAe experience iu tln' prinliii-: business, liis correct and uiu'i-ht habits, 
united with his .sterling ability as a writer, will make the Journal a Kcpublican i)aper which the 
resp(-cfable portion of that organization will feel willins to claim as their representative." 

For further particulars address T. 8. TAYLOR & CO , Journal ollice, Fort Wayne, Ind. 



THE PEOPI^E'S PAPER. 

The Sunday IVIorning Times. 

ITS .sevehtth year. 

PRICE, ._-__-- THREE CEWTS. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SUNDAY MORNING, BY 
JOIIIV H. TAOGART, 

AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THIRD AND DOCK STREETS, 
PHIL Vl>i:i.PIIIA. 
The Sunday Times is the livilir.st ami raciest .SUNDAY PAPER published in Philadel- 
phia, and contains ALL THE LATEST 1 KLK( ii; A I'lllC NEWS UP TO MIDNIGHT ON SAT- 
URDAY, from all quarters, ,SPE(I.\L (:()f;iM>lM)\ denCE, together Avith INTERESTING 
LETTERS FROM WASHINGTON and OTHi:!; PolSTS. 
As an Advertising Medium, it lias !'< -^v lOqiials. 

RATE.S KOU Al>* lOKTISIiVGi 
Ten cents per line for the first insertion. 
Business Notices, and notices before marriages. Twenty cents per line. 



The Wew Covenant, 

NOW PUBLISHED BY 
THE IVORTHWESTERA' I'lVIVERSALIST PlTBt,ISHIJVG HOUSE, 

IS THE LARGEST AND BEST UNIVERSALIST FAMILY PAPER IN THE DENOMINATION. 
It is quarto in form, and printed on beautiful white paper. While it is a Denominational 
Paper, it has Special Departments devoted to General Literature, the Home Circle, Farm and 
Garden, and (Jeneral News. 

J. W. Hanson, ------- Editor. 

TERMS:— $■- .lO PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE. Send for a SPECIMEN COPY if you do not al- 
ready take it. Adrlre-ss, 

S. GILBERT, 144 East Madison Street, Cliicago. 

Advertising^ Rates : 

Iw. Im. .•5m. Cm. Iv. 1 '" Iw. Im. 3in. Om. ly. 

1 sq., 1 inch, .is:! (lO $10 00 $2."> 00 $.!.') 00 $!:") 00 I-'2 column, $1"> 00 $1.") 00 $S() (lO $12.-) 00 ^li:^ 00 
'2 squares, ."i 00 1.5 00 ;;,5 00 4.') 00 .■•)l) 00 1 column, 2.'> 00 SO 00 12.5 00 225 00 4(K1 00 

1-1 column, 10(10 25 00 (10 00 80 00 125 Oil | Sl'KCI.VL NO I'ICKS— ao CK.'VTS a line. 

The Genius of Liberty, 

CmOWTO'WJV, PIOiVIVSYLV.lIVI.V, KSTAJILISIIEI> 1S05. 

Has a largcM- ciivadalion by over l,o(iO than any jtaper publisbiMl in the county, an<l at 

least .SOO more tlian the eombin(>d circid:lt ion of both of its comi^ctitors. " Its 

bona-fuir circulation is 2..->0<». .Vdvcrl i>crs who want to reach a rich, 

wealthy, and buying community should advertise witli us. 



Ai>vi:Rrisi:\'G rates: 



I time 2 t. 1 mo. ;'. mo. i; mo. 1 yr. 

5, $100 $1.50 $2.50 $t 00 $'i (M) $10"00 

2 00 3 00 r. 00 7 00 8 00 H 00 

H .50 4 .50 (! m 10 00 1.5 00 2.) 00 



1 tim(\ 2 1. I mo. :> mo. <> mo. M-r. 

>1 . • $'; 00 $7 50 $11 00 $18 00 $25 00 $W)' 00 

II 00 1100 18 00 25 00 .iO (H) 4,5 00 

■ 2 M)(» 25 00 40 00 00 00 75 00 125 00 



To Advertisers who wish to advertise durins thrcM' or four months in th(^ year, rluring the 
"season," we will otfisr special inducements. Column, hall-column or one-quarter column rat<^8, 
very reasonable, only :5.5 cents per square (10 line.s of N(ni|iareil) per month, .\ildress 

A. M. GIRSOX, Editor and Proprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 247 

The Voice of Masonry. 

A MONTHLY MASONIC AND FAMILY MAGAZINE. 

The Masters and Secrotarios of Lodges are respectfnlly invited to act as agents in obtaining 
subscriptions for the Magazine, or any Master Mason in good standing. 

Agents obtaining four subscribers will have a fifth free, and for an increased number, either 
cash or Masonic Works in like proportion, 

J. C. ^V. BAIXEY, PublUIier, 

1G4 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

ALSO HIS 
MASOIVIC EMPORIUM, 

FOR ALL KINDS OF 

Masonic BooUs, Cliaits, Tools, Jewels, Ballot Boxes, ^Vardeiis' Columns, Oavels, Cliap- 
ter Regalia, Canvass, Rods, Pillars, Ijods;e Blanks, &,e., &c. 

THE CHK'AGO PRICE CURREWT. 

A %Veekly Paper for 

THE MERCHANT, THE MECHANIC, THE MANUFACTURER, THE BUSINESS MAN, THE 
FARMER, AND FOR THE FAMILY CIRCLE. 

It contains the Price Current of nearly every article bought and sold in Chicago, corrected 
every week, expressly for it, at first-class business houses, besides Commercial, Financial and 
Manufacturing News, miscellaneous readinj^. &c., &c. 

J. C. W. BAILEY, Editor and Proprietor, 

1G4 Soiith Clark Street. 



The Utah Reporter. 



THE OBTLT "GEIVTIliE" IVEWSPAPER PUBlilSHED 

IN 
Utah Territory. 



THE LARGEST DAILY AND WEEKLY CIRCULATION 

Of any Paper in the Mountains, and the Best Advertising 3Iediuna 

liV THE ^VEST 

ON ACCOUNT OF ITS SPECIALITY. 

HUYCK &- MERRICK, Proprietors, 

('oriune, Utah. 



248 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

The Santa Barbara Press, 

a:v ixi»kpkxih:at rkim bi.ica.\ Joi-R:vAr,, 

Devoted to the interests of Southeni California, aiming to present in eveiy number valuable 
intorniation to those desiring to emigrate to this choice region of the world, and furnishing its 
readers with the ripest wisdom of succ-<'ssful tillers of the soil, and striving to raise the standard 
of politic-ill honor and pulilit- niorals. I'ulilishoil in a rcginu e(|uuling Italy fur climate, and ad- 
dressiii','- a class of readers not sur]iasse(l ]i\ any section for thrift and intellii,'enee, it atfords an 
Inviting inediiuu fur enterprising advertisers. It is the oidy newaiiaper puljlisluMl in the 
county— a county almost as large as the State of Massaclius(>tfs, Many families take no other 
paper, and hence can only be reached through the columns of THE PKESS. 

THE SANTA BARBARA PRESS is issued weekly, on Saturdays, at Santa Barbara, California, 
by J. A. JOHNSON, Editor and Proprietor. Terms, $5 Per Annum. 

Terms of Business Advertisements : 
One column, by the month, no change, ........ ^12 00 

Half column ' >• '■ •• 9 00 

Quarter column, " " ........ 5 OO 

One square " •'......... 2 00 

"DEVOTKD TO MIM\(; AND OTIIKF. INTERESTS." 

The Lake Superior Miner^ 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, AT ONTONAGON, MICHIGAN. 
THOMAS J. r,ASIER, Editor and Proprietor. 

TERMS— $2 !>0 PER ANNUM IN ADVANCE. 

Advertisers desiring to reach the INIining Districts of Lake Superior should advertise in 
THE JIINER, which is the most widely circulated and most i'.\tensi\ ely read of any jiaper pub- 
lished on the shores of Lake Superior. Tiy THE MlNKi; as an ad\ iriising medium". 

Any party or parties desiring a true exponent of the COl'I'ER MINING INTERESTS of Lake 
Superior, whose views and editorial opinions arc reliable, should iubscribe for THE MINER. 

Advertising Rates : 
1 square, 6 months, - - - $ 7 00 1 1 square, 1 year, - - - - $12 00 

1-4 col., 6 " - ... 20 00 I 14 col., 1 " ... 3000 

1-2 " 6 " - - - 37 00 I 1-2' " I " - - - - 55 00 

1 " <; " - - - - 67 00 I I " 1 '• - - - 100 00 

For difi"erent amount of space, for shorter time, fair rates will be offered. 

All communications should be addressed to THOMAS J. EASIER, Publisher. 

Geo. p. Bowell & Co., 40 Park Row, are our New York Agents. 





1 w. 


1 m. 


3 m. 


() m. 


1 yr. 


1 square, 


$1 00 


$2 50 


$5 00 


$7 00 


$10 00 


1-8 column, 


2 50 


4 00 


6 00 


8 00 


12 00 


1-4 '• 


3 50 


5 50 


8 00 


12 00 


20 00 



The Weyauwega Times- 

PrBIilSHED EVERY SATFRDAY _ - _ by F. ^V. SACKETT. 

WEYAUWEGA, WIS. 
Terms: ...... $2 per Annum, in ADVANCE. 

Casli Rates of Advertising: 

1 w. 1 m. 3 m. C m. 1 yr. 

1-2 column, $0 00 $10 00 $18 00 $2.5 00 $40 00 

1 " 10 00 Ki 00 25 00 40 00 (iO 00 

Only paper published in a growing village of 2,000 inhabitants. Largest circulation of any 
paper in the county. It is not a political journal, but independent on all subjecte. Has a good 
circulation; rapidly increasing. An excellent medium for advertising in the lumber region of 
Wisconsin. 

Gi;(). P. RoAVELL & Co., 40 Park Row, New York .\geuts. 

I.A CROSSE, _______ WlStO^XSIIV. 

Daily and Weekly Leader, 

TAVI.OK KRO.S., Publishers, 

The I>eader is a llrst-class iiewspai)er, size of the Cliuaijo 'I'rihidic, and has the largest cir- 
culation of any paper published in 

l\orth-»veHtern AViMcoiisiii or Southern Miiiikesota, 
AM) IS STEADILY AND R.\PIDLY INCREASlNti. 
As an Advertising Medium, THE f.iEAl»ER Is unsurpassed. 
The publishers take pleasure in referring advertisers to any of the responsible business men 
in the Northwest. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



249 



ST. r^otJis 



Daily and Weekly Tribune, 



THE LEADING 



PROTECTIVE TARIFF PAPER I IV THE WEST, 



AND ONLY ONE IN ST. LOUIS. 



PUBLISHED 



TRIBUNE COMPANY, 



No. 17 North Third Street, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Pittsburg Volksblatt. 

l>Air,T AND TVEEMLY. 
ALLEGHENY BLAETTER, 

THE ONLY GERMAN SUNDAY PAPER IN PITTSBURG, PA. 
C. F. BAUER, Publisher. 





thfleld S 


treet, Betwe 


en Sixth and Seventh 


Avenues, 


Pittsburg. 






ADVERTISING RATES: 










DAILY. 






1 time, 

3 " . 

4 " . . . 
6 " - 

2 weeks, - 

3 " . . 


1 square 
$ 75 

- 1 60 
1 90 

■ 2 50 
4 35 

- 6 00 


. 1-2 square. 
$ 40 
90 
I 15 

1 40 

2 50 

3 20 


1 month, - 

2 " - - 

3 " ... 
6 " - - 

9 " ... 
1 year, - 


1 square. 
$7 50 

- 11 25 
13 75 

- 20 75 
27 00 

- 32 00 


1-3 square. 
$4 00 

6 00 

7 00 
12 00 
15 50 
18 00 


1 square, 1 insertion, - 

3 
4 

" 5 '• 


- 


WEE 

- $ 75 

1 25 

- 1 60 
1 90 

- 2 30 


KLY. 

1 square, (i insertions, 
" 3 months, 
" 6 " 
" 12 " 
Local Notices, 10 cents 


per line. 


- $2 50 

5 00 

• 8 00 

15 CO 


1 square, 1 time, - 

" 2 '« 
" 3 " 
" 1 month. 




ALLEGHENY 

$ 75 
1 25 

1 50 

2 00 


BLAETTER. 

1 square, 3 months, - 

" 6 " . - 
" 1 " ... 
Special Notices, 15 cents per line. 


- $4 00 

- 7 00 

10 00 






SUBSCRIPTION t 






Daily Volksblatt, 






«- 


per Year. 


Weekly " ' . 






$.» OO 


Allegheny Blaetter, 




- 


2 .-50 


(( 



250 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

Le Bulletin de New York, 

A WEEKLY FIIVAAXIAt, AJSU COMMEllCIAL I ItEAfll UEVIEW. 

EDm. RATISRO:V]VE, Editor and Proprietor. 

OFFICE, 48 BliOAD STREET. 



KATES OF ADVERTISING: 

One column, ------....... $00 00 

One line, ............. 20 

Business Card, a year, ...... - , - . 5U 00 

Special Notices, a line, -.--....-*.. 40 

Editorial Notice, a line, ........... 1 00 



The Harrisonville Democrat. 

rUBLISIIED WEEKLY AT IIAUllISOXVILLE, MO. 
r.arge8t and Best Republican Paper in tlie County Seat of Cass County, Missouri. 

Tekms, $2 A Year. 

N. B— No one need apply for advertising ispace who does not intend to pay me ; such will lose 
their postage. I have been to too much trouble and expense in securing a good list of sub- 
scribers to stand trilling irom swindlers. 

Address S. T. HARRIS, Harrisonville, Mo. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 



Ashley County Times. 

PITBtilSHED AT HA.>IBITRG, ARIiAIVSAS, BY J. ^Y. CLYDE. 

Tlie Times is the only paper published in Aslilcy County, and bids fair to have a large cir- 
culation, and presents superior inducements to business men generally to introduce themselves 
and their business to the citizens of Southeast Arkansas and Northeast Louisiana. 

Rates of Advertising— $1 50 per square, first insertion , and 75 cents for each subsequent 
insertion. Liberal contracts made with merchants and others wishing to advertise for three 
mouths or longer. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co , Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 



The West Virginia Journal. 

A REPlIBt,lCA.\' IVE^VSPAPER, Pl'Br.,ISHi:i> AT CHARLESTOJV. 

Hanawlia County, tlie Capital of West Virginia, and Having; the Hiurgest Circulation 

of any IVe^vspaper in the Third Cous^ressional District, 

Which ttmbraees nearly one-half of the entire counties of the State. The resources of the 
KanawliaVall V, wliiih are being rapitUy developed, make it. at the present time, one of the 
best fields for advertising to be found in the United Slates. The Journal is tin; organ of tlio 
Republican party for the Third Congressional District. 

(i. W. ATKI."VSOX <fc CO., Publishers. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 



H. BiO.MM.K'S 



Buffalo Telegraph 

sTEA.n PRiiVTii^u omcio, rtuo >i.n.\ sTHi:i:T. bii-imlo, i%. y. 

The Buffalo Tele«rapli is pul)li-lied at .'i o'clock in the morning, iil j?i> .'>i' per annum. ) I'ayabjc 
The Buffalo Sonntiigs Zelluug is i)ul)lislied evtuy .Sundav morning at $2 " > in 

The Weekly BuiTulo Telt^iapli is puljlisluMl every Tuesday, at $'2 " > advance. 

<iRKAT ADVArWTA<iES FOR BirSIi\'ESS MEPV TO ADVERTISE. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 3r>l 



The Pontiac Gazette, 

rrnLisiiKD weekly, at 

POWTIAt, OAKI.AIVI> COUNTY, MICIHOAK, 

BY RANN & TUKXEK. 



The Gazettk is the hirgest papei- in Oakland County, 28x44; is the official paper of both city 
and county, and has a larger circulation, by some hundreds, than any other paper in its section. 
Pontiac, a thriving, growing, wide awake city of over 6,000 people, is the county seat, and nearly 
the geogi-aphical centre of Oakland county, the fourth in the State in population and wealth. 
The city is one of the largest grain and the largest wool market in the State. The Gazette 
goes into every town in the county, and circulates also in Lopeer, Wayne, Genesee, and other 
counties, and is the best advei-tising medium in the county. For proof of this we refer adver- 
tisers to the paper itself. By it they can see the estimation in which it is held by business 
men at home. 







ADVERTISIIVfi RATES : 










1 w. 


2 w. 


3 w. 


4 w. 


2 m. 


3 m. 


Om. 


lyr. 


One inch, - 


- $1 00 


$1 ,-50 


$2 00 


$2 50 


$4 00 


$5 00 


$8 00 


$12 60 


Two inches, 


- 1 ^0 


2 25 


3 00 


3 50 


5 00 


6 50 


12 00 


20 00 


Three " 


- 2 00 


3 00 


4 00 


5 00 


7 50 


9 00 


15 00 


25 00 


Four 


- 2 .'iO 


4 00 


5 50 


7 00 


10 00 


12 00 


18 00 


30 00 


1-4 column, - 


- 4 50 


(i 50 


8 50 


10 00 


15 00 


19 00 


25 00 


40 00 


Special notices .30 


per cent 


. in addition. Business 


notices, 


ten cents per 


line. No cuts 


inserted except on metal body, ; 


and no ( 


leception 


advertisements of any : 


kind. 





ACKIVOWl.£I>GEI> THE BEST OF THE DEMOCRATIC WEEKLIES ! 

The New York Day-Book. 

Having the largest ciix'ulation of any Democratic Weekly in the country, embracing the 
entire South, it i.s unequaled as an advertising mciliuni The publishers of Thk D.vy-Book refer 
with pleasure to the parties ailvertising in it.s columns, in proof of tlie truth of the assertion 
that the percentage of yield on the cost of advertising is greater than in anv other paper 
published in New York City. Its circulation is among the most intelligent and thrifty farming, 
agricultural, and mercantile classes, who do not generally take other papers, and can be 
reached only through the medium ot Tin-; Day-Bdoic. Publishing no daily paper now, we are 
enabled to give our whole time and attention to iiashingthe circulation of our weekly. Adver- 
tisers may depend upon the statements herein made as correct. 

WHAT OtTR ADVERTISERS SAY. 

Messrs. Van Evrie, Hortov & Co.— Gentleman: Having for several years had occasion to 
avail ourselves of the advertising facilities attorded by the New Y'oijk Day-Book, we have 
found it a most satisfactory and etfective medium, especial Iv for reaching the people of the 
South. ■ Respectfully, 

DEMAS BARNES & CO , AND P. H. DRAKE & CO., 
Proprietors Drake^s Plantation Bitters. 
Letter from Messrs. Grovesteen & Co., Piano Manufacturers. 
Messrs. Vav Evkie, Horton & Co.— Having advertised to a considerable extent in your 
paper, The New Yokk Weekly Day'-Book, we find it a duty to advertisers to say that we con- 
sider it the be-^t medium in the country to make known their wants to the public. We have 
advertised extensivi'ly in hunflreds of newspapers of all classes, and we are free to .say that 
we have derived mure benefit trom our advertisements in The New York DayBook than from 
any or nearly all combined. It has no superior. Very respectfully yours, 

GROVESTEEN & CO., Piano Manufacturers. 

Terms or Advertisinsf : On seventh page, 25 cents per line. On eighth page, 40 cents per 
line. Deductions for continued advertisements from above rates. 10 per cent, ofl" for 1 month. 
20per cent, olf for '. months. 33 per cent otT for '5 months. .50 per cent. olT for 12 months. These 
rates are lower than those of other journals, which, though claiming a Lirger, have much less 
circulation. The Day-Book is a quarto sheet, well printed on good paper. New York Weekly 
D.\Y-BoOK, published every Saturday, is furnished by mail to subscribers on the following 
terms— cash in advance: One cojij', one year, $2; three copies, one year, $5; five copies, one 
year, and one to the getter up of the club, $9; additioml copies, $1 75; ten copies, one year, and 
one to the getter up of the club, $17; additional copies, $1 70; twenty-one copies, one year, and 
one copy free, $.!0; additional copies, ^l 50. We write the names on the papers at the above rates. 

VAIV EVRIE, HORTOX & CO., IVo. 163 IVassau St., IV. Y. 



252 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Bolivar Bulletin. 



BOLIVAU, IIAHDEMAN COUNTY, TENN. 
Piibllslied Every Saturday, by M. R. PARRISII, Editor and Proprietor. 

ONLY PAPER IN THE SENATORIAL DISTRICT, 
COHIPOSED OF HARDEMAN, McNAIRT, AlVD HARDIX COTJ^TTIES, 

and circulates extcnsivelj' in Texas and Arkansas. 

POLITICS: DEMOCRATIC. 

Price, $3 per year to any address. 



The Crisis. 



A WEEKLY DEMOCRATIC JOURNAL, PUBLISHED AT COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
WJH. TREVITT «t CO., Proprietors. WM. TREVITT, W. W. VI'EBB, Editors. 

The Crisis is a large quarto sheet, nearly all reading matter, devoted to Western interests, 
and sound " radical" Democratic principles. It has, probably, the largest circulation among 
the agricultural and mechanical classes of any paper in Ohio. 

TERMS : $2 PER ANXUM. REDUCED RATES FOR CLUBS. 

A LIMITED IVUMBER OF ADVERTISEMEIVTS IIVSERTED AT FAIR RATES. 



ADVERTISE ! ADVERTISE ! ADVERTISE ! 

The Piqua Democrat, 

Published every Wednesday, at J'lqua, Miami County, Ohio, 

l8 the only Democratic paper within a circuit of forty miles, and is the largest circulating and 

cheapest advertising medium within said distance. 

WIIililAM A. MARIETTA, Editor and Publisher. 

Rates of Advertising ; 

1 w. 1 m. 3 m. f> ni. 1 yr. I 1 w. 1 m. 3 m. (> m. 1 vr. 

1 square, $1 (K) $2 00 $4 00 $(i (K) $10"0) 1-2 column, *(i 00 $12 00 $24 00 $32 00 $.'50 00 

1-4 column, 4 00 7 00 14 00 20 00 30 00 | 1 column, 10 00 20 00 32 00 50 00 DO 00 

Address all orders to THE DEMOCRAT, Piqua, Ohio. 

(iEo. P. RowELL & Co. arc our New York Agents, and all orders from tlicm will receive 
prompt attention. 



The Sunday Morning News. 

(THE ONLY SUNDAY PAPER IN COLUMBUS, OHIO.) 
PIJBI.I8HED ISY THE COI^ITMBUS PHIIVTIIVG CO.MPAIVY. 

A local, literary and news Journal ; i)ulilish(s all the regular and special telegraphic news, 
and local news of the city, non-politii iil. 

THE IVEW.S has altogether the largest local circulation, as it is taken by all parties and 
classes. 

Terms, ____----.---- $•£ I'or Annum. 

Advertisements inserted at reasonable rates. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



AlV INSTTRAIVCE JOTIRlVAIi. 



"The Chronicle" 

FOB 1870. 
The Only Weekly Iiisui-aiice Journal in the West. 



PROSPECTUS. 



THE YEAR 1870 PROMISES TO BE ONE OF UNUSUAL IMPORTANCE TO THE INSU- 
rance interests of the couutry. The changes that have been made, and are making, in the 
insurance laws of the several States and their administrators— the necessity of reform in certain 
departments of underwriting wliich grows daily more urgent and imperative— the late adverse 
decision of the United States Supreme Court, removing all hope of constitutional remedy for 
the restrictions and injustice of unfriendly legislation— the recent failures of life insurance 
companies in England, and the prevailing disposition on the part of the secular press to make 
unfair criticisms upon American life underwriting— all attest the necessity that exists for a 
journal 

Ilf THE INTERESTS OF IIVSURAIVCE, 

Which shall bring to the advocacy of needed reforms and the discussion of the serious questions 
arising, vigor, ability, and boldness, and which shall be published with sufficient frequency to 
meet the issues while they are living, and " strike while the iron is hot." 

The publishers of the Chronicle present it to the insurance fraternity as such a journal. In 
so doing, no longer recital of its claims or boastful assumption of superiority are deemed 
necessary. It is equally unnecessai-y to announce to the insurance public that the Chronicle 
is an established success. Its history and position for the past four years, as an insurance jour- 
nal, renders such an announcement superfluous. 

THE POI^ICY OF THE CHRONICIiE 

Will be in the future what it has been in the past, the bold and uncompromising advoc-.io- of 
what it believes to be right, and the equally bold and uncompromising denunciation of what it 
believes to be wrong. It will be 

BOtrUHT BY NO PATRONAGE, AWED BY NO THREATS, 

Guilty of no sycophancy. It shall be made to the companies an authority on all matters per- 
taining to their business, and to the people. 

An Exponent of the Principles, and an Advocate of the Claims of Insurance. 



The subscription price of the Chronicle will remain at $3, in advance. With its 

FIFTY-TWO ISSUES EACH YEAR, 

The Chronicle, in original editorials, contributed papers, judicious selections, reports of 
important insurance cases and decisions, statistical information, news items and general 
miscellany, furnishes more value for the same money than any journal in the world. It circu- 
lates in every State in the Union and in England. 

THE CHRONICLE PUBLiISHING COMPANY, 

No. 124 Washington Street, Chicago, lU. 

JOHN J. W. O'DONOGHUE, President and Tkeasurek. 



254 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

THE LARGEST XEWSPAPEK XX VERMO^TT. 

The Rutland Independent. 

$2 OO per Year in advance. 
MC LEAjV &. ROBBIIVS, ..... Publishers, Rutland, Vt. 

ADVERTISING RATES: 



3 " - - 

4 

5 " - - 

1-4 col , 

1-2 " 

3-4 •' 

1 " - - 

a^ Advertisements m:iy be changed quarterly at these rates. Changed monthly, 25 per 
cent, advance. Changed weekly, double rates. 

Its' Reading Notices, Brevier or Nonpareil, 20 cents per line, first insertion ; 10 cents per line 
for each subsequent insertion. 



We are also proprietors of The Rutland County Journal, published at Poultney, in which 
advertisements will be published at 2') per cent, discount from above rates. Advertisements in- 
serted in both papers at 50 per cent, advance on above rates. 

Circulation over 1,500. 



wk 


2 w'ks. 


3 w'ks. 


1 mon. 


2 mos. 


3 mos. 


Gmos. 


9 mos. 


lyr. 


fu 7.-. 


$1 1.5 


$1 .50 


$1 75 


$2 (i5 


$3 50 


$5 2.5 


$7 00 


*8 25 


1 UO 


1 .50 


2 00 


2 3t 


3 50 


4.50 


7 01) 


9 2.5 


11 00 


1 .^.0 


2 2.5 


3 00 


3 50 


5 25 


75 


10.50 


13 75 


10 50 


2 00 


3 00 


4 00 


4 75 


7 (K» 


9 00 


11 2.5 


18 ,50 


22 00 


2 .'iO 


3 75 


4 75 


5 75 


8. no 


11 25 


17 25 


22 .50 


27 00 


3 m 


4 50 


5 75 


7 00 


10 .50 


13 50 


21 UO 


27 00 


32 .50 


3 2-, 


4 87 


(i2.5 


7 50 


11 .50 


U 75 


25 00 


2.» 75 


35 75 


.')0 


8 25 


10 75 


12 75 


19 25 


25 00 


38 75 


50 50 


GO 00 


7 2) 


10 75 


U 25 


17 00 


2) .50 


33 00 


.51 25 


m 50 


81) I'O 


i) 00 


13 .50 


17 50 


21 00 


31 50 


41 00 


GJ 50 


fc2 59 


100 00 



Mississippi Valley Review 

AND 

ST. LOUIS JorR.x.4^r, of co:»i.merce. 

Published >VeeUly at 27 South TliUd Street, St. Louis, Mo., 
BY THE ECOiVOIMICAL I»RLVTi:VG COMPANY, W. V. WOLCOTT, President. 

EDITED BY MYRON COLONEY AND F. A. CRANDALL, 
With Competent Assistance in Several Special Departments. 

Is the oldest, largest, and most widely circulated Commercial Journal in the Mississippi Val- 
ley. Is of unequaled value as an advertit^iug medium for wholesale houses, as its circulation is 
wholly among business men. Treats of and is a recogiiizeil authority on Commerce, Finance, 
Railroading, Inventions, Insurance, Mining, Manufacturing, Farming, Immigialion, Real Estate, 
River Navigation, Ship Building, Internal ImprovtMuents, and the General Material Develop- 
ment and Intlustrial Pursuits of the Missis.-^ippi Valley. Has an illustrated article each week. 

»^- Mr. Coloney was for four years Commercial Editor of the MissoiiKr Democuat, and is 
recognized as the most successful commercial writer ever located in St. Louis. He now writes 
only tortile Mississippi Viilley Review. 

TERMS AND RATES: 

For tlie I'apcr: One year, $t; six months, $2 25. Cash in advance. 

For Advertisements J ()n<i jiage (10.\U inclics) each iiisei'lion, $2.5; one-hnlf ]iago, $15; onc- 
fourlli (one ccilmim) pige, $M; less than one coliinin, 7 1-2 cents jier line each iiiscrlitni. Cash 
moiilhlv 1)1' Miiiirlcrly ill adv:inc('. Discounts Ironi these I'ati's are allowed lis follow ts : On ad- 
vciiisciiicnts coiiiiniicd for thi-ee months, ID per cent.; 6>i.\ months, 15 percent.; one year, 20 per 
cent. 

afw" Specimen copies sent free on application. 

**- We giv(! a Weekly Review, in detail, of the sales on 'Change in St. Louis, and a vci-y full 
St. Louis I'nce Current. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



255 



Milwaukee News^ 



Daily, Semi-Weekly and n^eUly. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE CITY AND COUNTY 



PAUr. & CADT^'AIiljADER, Publishers. 



Advertising Rates in Daily ; 



Ten lines of solid nonpareil (our orilinarj^ advertising type) mako one square. 



One day, 
Two days, 
Three days, 
Four days, 
Five days, 
One week, 
Two weeks, 
Three weeks. 
One month, 
Six weeks. 
Two months. 
Three months. 
Four months, • 
Six months, 
Kine months, ■ 
One year, 



I square. 2 sqrs 
$1 00 $1 5C 

- 1 50 
2 00 

- 2 50 



3 00 
- 5 00 
7 00 
9 00 
11 50 
13 00 
17 00 
20 00 
25 00 
32 CO 
38 00 



2 50 

3 50 

4 50 

5 25 

6 00 
9 00 

12 00 
Id 00 
20 00 
23 00 
28 00 
33 00 
42 00 
50 00 
GO 00 



3 sqrs. 

$2 00 

3 50 

5 00 

6 50 

7 50 

8 50 
13 50 
18 00 
23 50 
28 00 
33 00 
40 00 
48 00 
59 00 
72 00 
80 00 



4 S(4rs. 

$2 50 

4 50 

6 50 

8 50 

9 50 
II 00 
18 00 
24 00 
30 00 
36 00 
43 00 
52 00 
G3 00 
76 00 
90 00 

ICO 00 



5 sqrs. 

$3 00 

5 50 

8 00 

10 50 

12 00 

13 50 
22 50 
29 50 
37 00 
44 00 
53 00 
64 00 
78 00 
93 00 

106 00 
120 00 



sqrs. 
$3 50 
6 50 
9 50 
12 50 
14 00 
16 00 
27 00 
35 00 
44 00 
52 00 
C3 00 
76 00 
93 00 
110 00 
125 00 
140 00 



7 sqrs. 
$4 00 
7 50 
11 00 
14 50 
16 00 
18 50 
31 50 
40 00 
50 00 
60 00 
75 00 
88 00 
106 00 
125 00 
144 00 
160 00 



8 sqrs. 
$4 50 
8 50 
12 50 
16 50 
18 00 
21 00 
36 00 
45 00 
56 00 
(18 00 
83 00 
100 00 
118 00 
140 00 
166 00 
180 00 



9 sqrs. 
$5 00 
9 50 
14 OO 
18 00 
20 00 
23 50 
40 50 
50 00 
60 00 
76 00 
90 00 
110 00 
1.30 00 
150 00 
180 00 
2C0 00 



1. City Items double tabular rates. Special Notices 50 per cent, above tabular rates. 

2. Local Notices 25 cents per line for each insertion, but no insertion less than $1. 

3. Advertising in both Daily and Semi-Weekly editions, 25 per cent, additional to the above 
rates. 

4. Advertising in Weekly, $1 per square for first insertion, and 75 cents per square for each 
additional insertion. 

5. All transient or non-resident advertising must be paid in advance. 

6. Daily News, by mail, $10 per year; Semi-Weekly, $4; Weekly, $2. 

SS' The above Scale is for business Advertisements only. Legal advertisements at rates al- 
lowed bv law. 



fl^ For nearly twenty successive years The ]Ve-»vs has been, and it now is, the Official 
Paper of the City and County of Milwaukee. It circulates largely in Wisconsin, Iowa, Minne- 
sota and Western Michigan. As a representative of the interests of business men, or as a me- 
dium lor Northwestern Advertising, it is unsurj^assed by any otlier joui-nal. Merchants, Manu- 
facturers and others, who desire an increase of trade in the Northwest, invariably and continu- 
ously employ its columns for that purpose, always with satisfactory results. 



2.56 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Daily Programme, 



OFFitK, Ao. SI \vasiii\<;to.x STKICKT, 

tllKAiJO, II.I.. 
P O Box OOO. !'• •'• M-VSSIE, PUBLISHER. 

TKRMS : 
Special UTotices, each insertion, five cents per line. 

First Page. 
Per square, ten lines of Nonpareil, con.stitnting one square, $1() per month. 
One square per annum, $00. 

Second, Tliird, and FouitU Pages. 
Per square, ten lines of Nonpareil constituting one sipiarc, $') per month. 
One square per annum, $50. , , ,, , , 

A reduction made for yearly and half-yearly advertisements by the quarter, half or whole 
column. 

THE I>AIt,T PROGRAmMK 
Will be left or mailed to any address every morning for $1 per annum in advance. 



National Sunday School Teacher, 

OF CHICAGO, _ . . . ILLIXOI^*. 

■We desire to call your attention to the value of this MAGAZINE as an advertising me- 
dium It has a circulation of ;J0,000, and is sent into eveiy State and Territory in the Union. 
Its subscribers include Pastors, Superintendents and Teachers of Sunday Schools (the best busi- 
ness men in every communit v), and each number is used by them as a text book for the entire 
month. Our advertisements will be select, and advertising pages made neat and attractive. 
You will find it to your advantage to give the National Sunday School Teaclier your pat- 
ronage. 

^ TERMS : 

One page, one month, - - $75 00 I One-quarter page, one month, - $26 00 

One-half page, " - - 45 00 | One-eighth piige, " - 15 00 

On pages next to reading matter and cover ao PKR I'FXT. IIIcaiER. 
All bills for advertising paval)Ic month] v. (.>r<lers lorlr-^s than nur lialliiiige one month should 
be accompanied bv tlic mon^y. On all orders for three consccnt i vc months, a discount ot 10 pel" 
cent, will be made ; for si. \ months, 15 per cent.; and tor one year iMi per cent. 

Address, ADAMS, BI^ACKMER & t,YO]V, Chicago. 



The Comic Monthly, 

THE LiEADING COMIC PAPER. 

CIRCULATION (AVERAGE) 10,500. 

ADVERTISIIVG : 

Inside pages, TWENTY CENTS PER LINE. Si.xteenth page, THIRTY CENTS PER LINE. 

SIIBSCRIPTION, 

$1 25 PER VE.\R, or FIVE DOLLARS FOR FIVE COPIES. 

JIONSE HAIVET &. CO., IVo. IIO Nassau Street, New Torlc. 



The Christian Leader. 

A WEEKLY RELU;iOUS FAMILY NKWSP.M'KR, P115LISI1K1) BY 

The Executive Board of the New York State Convention of lUiiversalists. 

Rev. «. H. EMERSON, Editor. 

The fourth volume eonimenced Jan. 1, IH70. It is the only paper authorized to report and 
publish the sermons of Rev. K. II. Ciiai-in, I). I). It contains an Agricultural Department, edited 
by Prof. Walters, and a Children's Department, edited by Mrs. Cmiolink \. Souiai;. 
Terms : $2 50 per year, in advance; by carriers, $:t. 

Advertising Rtites : 
One insertion, per solid line, .-..-- ao cents. 

Four " " " each insei'tion, . - • - 15 " 

Eight " -. a .. ... [■> ■' 

Three " ...... .... lo >■ 

Special t^rms for yearly advertisements. No a<lvcrtisements i)uhlistied for less than $1. 
Special NoUccM," per line, ------- i') cents. 

Reading Matter, " .lO " 

Address AARON A. THAVEll, iiJ N.i..jsau Street, Room IS, N. Y. City. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 357 



Wlonroe Democrat 



:-I»llBI,ISHED KVEBY THURSDAY IIV THE BOROUGH OF STROUWSBURG, PA., 

BY A. O. GREENWALD. 

Terms of Niibscriptlon, $2 50 per Anuum, or $2 OO Strictly in Advance. 

Circulation 2,000, and Rapidly Increasing. 

OFFICIAL ORGAIV OF ItlOIVROE COUIVTT. 

CIRCULATES IN 

9Ionroe, Pike, Wayne, ILiUzerne, Carbon, and BTortlianipton Counties, 

AND IS THE 

LEADIIVG PAPER OF THIS SECTION. 

POPULATION OF STROUDSBURG 4,000. 

Stroudsburg has an inexhaustible Water Power, and contains extensive Tanneries, Woolen 
.MUls, Flour Mills, Planing Mills, Tanite Emery Wheel Factory, &c. 

The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad passes through the town, and the Lehigh 
.and Eastern Railroad will also pass through here, connecting with the Lehigh and Lackawanna 
KAilroad. 

Stroudsburg is also a great Summer resort, one hotel at Delaware Water Gap, in the imme- 
..diate vicinity, accommodating one thousand guests every summer. 

THE FACILITIES OF THE OFFICE FOR DOING 

JOB WORK 

Are unsurpassed by any establishment outside the large cities. The Newspaper, Book, and Job 
Department employ 

THREE STEAM POWER PRESSES. 

One of Potter's best, 32x48, one Hoe Folio Post, and one Gordon Franklin Quarto Medium. 
The varieties and assortments of Job Type, both wood and metal, are large. Plain and Fancy 
,Job Printing is executed here in any style, at short notice, at prices as low as can be done 
anywhere. 

Advertising Rates : 

2 mos. 
$2 50 
3 50 

5 00 

6 50 

8 00 

9 50 
11 00 
14 00 
18 00 
25 00 
30 00 

Twelve lines of Nonpareil to an inch. 27 inches in a column. Special Notices 10 cents per 
line for first insertion, and 5 cents per line for each subsequent insertion. Legal Notices at the 
jTates prescribed by law. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 
17 





1 w. 


2 w. 


3 w. 


im. 


Quarter inch. 


.50 


^1 00 


$1 25 


F$150 


One inch, 


.75 


1 25 


1 75 


2 00 


Two inches, 


$1 25 


2 00 


3 00 


3 50 


Three inches, 


1 75 


2 75 


3 75 


4 50 


Fonr inches, 


2 25 


3 50 


4 75 


5 50 


Five inches, 


2 75 


425 


5 50 


6 25 


Quarter column, 


3 00 


5 00 


6 25 


7 00 


Third of column, 


4 00 


6 25 


800 


9 50 


Half column, 


5 00 


7 50 


10 00 


12 00 


Three-quarter col. 


, 7 00 


10 00 


13 00 


15 00 


One column, 


9 00 


12 00 


15 00 


18 00 



3 mos. 


tJmos. 


1 year. 


$3 .50 


$5 00 


18 00 


4 50 


6 00 


10 00 


7 00 


10 00 


17 00 


9 00 


14 00 


22 00 


11 00 


18 00 


27 00 


13 00 


21 00 


32 00 


15 00 


24 00 


35 00 


20 00 


30 00 


48 00 


55 00 


36 00 


60 00 


.30 00 


48 00 


80 00 


35 00 


00 00 


100 00 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



COVI]VGTO:V JOrRXAI.. 



DAVIS & SOX, PriiLISIlEKS, 
COVINGTON, KY. 



r Rates of Advkutising.— One square (10 lines) 
1 insertion, 'he; each additional insertion, 25c.; 
i months, $2 50; one year, $8 00. Larger adver- 
tiisoments in proportion. 

Geo. p. Rowei.l & Co., Authorized Agents. 



OBSEKVliR AAI> KliPORTKK. 

Publish i;i» .-^kmi-wkeki.v, 

BV THE 

OBSERVER & REPORTER PRINTING CO., 
Ijexiiigton, Kentucky. 

Reasonable Rates for Advertising. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Authorized Agents. 



OGJuE COUNTY PRESS, 

POLO, ILLINOIS. 



J. TV. Clinton, Editor and Proprietor. 

(Twelve Nonpareil lines make a Square.) 
One insertion, $1; each subsequent insertion, 

50 cents. 
Send to the Publisher for rates for larger 

amounts. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Authorized Agents. 



ORLEAJVS REPUBI^ICAIV, 

C. G. BEACH & CO., 

Editors akd Pkopkietous, 

Albion, Orleans County, New York. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents. 
PliATTSBFRGH REPlTBr,lCAN. 

sixtieth ykak. 
R. G. stone, Editor and Proprietor. 

Issued Weekly at Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

A GOOD PAl-EIt FOR ADVERTISERS. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents. 



FORT VI^AYAE DEMOCRAT, 

R. D. DUMM & CO., PUBLISHERS, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Published Daily and Weekly. 



Advertisements, one square, 10 lines, $1..'>0, 
first insertion; 75 cents each subsequent in- 
sertion. 

Geo. P. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York 
City. 



TIFFIN TRIBUNE. 

(Mammoth Weekly, 30 l-2.x4it. Forty Columns.) 
XiOckes &■ Plymyer, Publishers, 

TIFFIN, OHIO. 
BONA fide circulation, 1,800. 

Adv-ertising Rates.— 28 inches, 1 year, $1 50;. 
14 inches, $87; 7 inches, $50; 3 inches, $27 50; 1 
inch, $12. 



PRAIRIE CITY GAZETTE. 

PUBLISHED EVERY MONTH BY 

CHEESEBUO & HARSHBERGER, 
Prairie City, Illinois. 

Advertising Rates.— i ineh, 1 in.sortion, 75c.: 
2 inches, $1 25; a inches $2; 1 inch, one year, $3; 
2 inches, $5; 1-4 column, $15; 12 column, $25; 
1 column, $45. 



TROY WEEKLY PRESS. 

Published by A. S. PEASE, Troy, N. Y. 

A DEMOCRATIC JOURNAL. 

Favorable Terms to Advertisers. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents. 



THE OXFORB FAIiCON, 

A LIVE CONSERVATIVE PAl-EK, 

Published Every Sulnnliiy, at O.xford, Miss. 
S. M. THOMPSON, i'ROl'lUKTOR. 

The Falcon in the OldcMt Paper and has 

the Larf;eMt t'irciiliitioii 04* any 

ill tile Coiiiily. 



GRANITE STATE NEWS, 

Pi'BLisiiED Weekly by 
Charles II. Parker, %Volf borough, N. H. 

Only Ropubliejui Paper in the County. 

Geo. P. Rowell & Co., Agents, New York. 



THE MONROE COMMERCIAL, 

Published Weekly by 
M. D. HAMILTON, MONROE, MICHIGAN. 



Space. 
1 inch 

To the busines.s men ,,f .Meniiiliis, St. Louis, I . j'"'''^® 
Loui.sviUe, New Orh'iins and elsewhere, the' 
rohinins of the Oxford Falcon ui'e the very 
l)(sl nieiliuiM of cdninninieiitlon with tlie peo- 
ple of Lal'niette. and a<lj<jinin« (■(junties. 



nches 
4 inclics 
1-4 col. 



RAri:S OF ADVERTISING : 

1 w. 1 m. .■{ m. G m. I yr. 

$1 00 $2 00 $;i 50 $5 00 $8 00 

1 50 2 75 5 00 8 00 12 00 • 

2 50 3 .50 7 00 10 00 14 00 

3 00 4 50 8 00 11 00 l(i 00 
3 50 5 50 10 00 14 00 18 00 



Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 259 

The Canton Wlail, 

PITBI.ISIIKI> EVERY SATITRI>AY MORJVIIVG BY SIIVGI.ET01V GARRETT, 
Office, 45 Peace Street, 

ca:\toiv, MISSISSIPPI. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIOHr : 

For one year, in advance, - - • - - - - - - - - $3 00 

For one year, if not paid in advance, - - • - - - - - - 4 00 

For six mouths, in advance, ......... i 50 

RATES OF ADVERTISIIVG : 

One square, ten lines, one week, - - - - - - - - - - $1 50 

One square, two weelss, ----------- 2 25 

One square, tliree weeks, .-..------- 3 00 

One square, one year, --.-.------ 15 00 

Two inches, one year, - - - - - - - - - - - 25 00 

Quarter column, one year, -...---..- 45 00 

Half column, one year, - - - - - - - - - - - 80 00 

One column, one year, ----------- 150 00 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 



Anzeiger des Westens, 



ST. LiOnS, MISSOURI. 



DAILY, WEEKLY, AND SUNDAY EDITIONS. 



THE BEST ADVERTISiarG MEDIUM IN THE VTEST. 



PRICES OF SUBSCRIPTION: 
Daily (Sunday included) - - - - - $10 00 per year. 

Weekly, .... 2 50 " 

Sunday Edition, - - - 2 50 " 

CARr. DAEj^ZER, Editor and Proprietor, 

Wos. 13 and 15 Worth TliUd Street. 



260 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



7 in. 


8 in. 


U in. 


$22 50 


$25 00 


$;{0 00 


31 00 


;{o 00 


40 00 


42 00 




50 00 



The Abbeville Press and Banner. 

IHHI.ISIIKI) KVKKY FIJID.W XV .MU'.KVlI.l.K, S ( . 

LI^U <fc WILSOA', Proprietors. 

Itates of Aclvertisiug. 

Advertisements inserted for a sliortcr time tlian tliiL-e months will be charged at the rate of 
$1 per inch, for the first insertion, and 5iic lor each siib:>equent. Advertisements inserted for 
three months or longer will he charged as tollows : 

1 inch. 2 in. 3 in. 4 in. 5 in. (i in. 

Three months, $ii 00 $10 00 $12 .'50 $15 00 $17 .50 $20 00 
Six months, - 10 00 10 00 18 00 22 00 2ii 00 28 00 

One year, ■ 12 ("i 20 00 2100 28 00 :iO 00 38 00 

The Winsted Herald. 

PrBtilSHED BY THK MI]\STEI> PKIA'TIA*,! COMPAIVY. 

T. F. VAILL, Editor. .... j. ii. VAILL, M.vnaging Editor. 

Circulation, Jan. 1, 1870, 1,825; Repuljlican in politics, and circulates among the best class of 
readers; has largest circulation in Litchfield County. Subscription price, $2. 
Advertising Ratesi : 
Single insertion, 80c. per inch; permanent rates, 20c. per inch, per week. 

Address J. H. VAIt.L, >Iauagiiig Editor, Winsted, Conn. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Authorized Agents. 



The Peoria Demokrat, 

A «ERMAIV DAILY AJSO WEKKLY NEWSPAPER, 

PUBLISHED AND EDITED BY B. CREMEH, 
Has the largest circulation of any German paper in Illinois, outside of Chicago, and, therefore, 
a good advertising medium to all business men. The Peoria Semokrut io a seven-column 
Daily and eight-column Weekly, especially patronized by the large German population of 
Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford, Mason, and Livingston Counties. With the newspaper is con- 
nected an extensive Steam Job Printing Establishment, where four steam presses are always 
running, to fill orders for German, English, French, and Scandinavian work. 

Advertisements inserted in both Issues, daily and weekly, at very reasonable rates. 

The Cambridge Jeffersonian. 

Publislied at Cambridge, Oliio. - Established in 1»33. - Circulation, 1,200. 

Is the Democratic organ for Guernsey and Noble counties, and consequently a good adver- 
tising medium. 

Rates of Advertising: 

One inch, 1 year, - . - - $10 00 I Quarter column, 1 j'ear, - - - $40 00 

" " 3 months, • - - - 3 00 '■ '■ 3 months, - - 15 00 

" " 6 months, - - - 5 .50 | " " months, - -25 00 

By the column at proportionate rates. 

CIIAS. E. MITCHEIVER, Publisher and Proprietor. 
Geo. p. Kowell & Co., 40 Park Row, New York, are Authorized Agents. 



Hartford City Democrat. 

PUBLISHED AT HARTFORD CITY', INDIANA (AND THE ONLY PAPER IN THE COirNTY), 
EVERY SATIIRBAY, BY CHAS. F. JACKSOJV. 

The only Democratic paper in the southern jiart of the Ninth Congressional District. 

Advertising Rates : 

Quarter column, 1 year, $15; (i months, $8; 3 months, $5. Half column, 1 year, $30; G months, 
$18; 3 months, $10. One column, 1 year, $(iO; (> months, $33; 3 months, $18. 
.Ml orders to be accompanied by the cash or good references. 



North Arkansas Times. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY', AT BATESVILLE, ARKANSAS. 
MAXWEI.,!. A, MCCL.URE, Editors and Proprietors. 
The Time* is the most jiopular advertising medium in North Arkansas, as an examination 
of its cohmms will sliow. Try it one year. " Who's afraid ?" For advertising rates address 
the proprietors. Rat(^s of subscription, $3 per year in advance. 

The TIm«« will be enlarged, in IMareh, 1870, to 31x4(> inches, in order to aecomTnodatC our 
rapidly iiurcasiiiLC advertising patromige. Will also commence the publication, in March, of the 
Real Eslnte Itulletin, with a gratuitous circulation ot 3,000 copies; will be the best advertis- 
ing medium in till- state. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Spirit of the Times. 

THE RECOGiXIZlDW SPOUTIAti AUTHOKITY OF AJMERICA. 



OFFICE, 201 WILLIAM STREET, K. Y. 



GEORGE ^VI£.KES, ..... Editor and Proprietor. 



FIVE DOLLARS A YEAR, - - - IN ADVAKCE. 

Single copies, .-.......-•- 15 centa. 

TO OLUBS— 5 copies, - - - - ' $22 50 

i) " 40 50 



RATES OF ADVERTISING > 

50 cents per line, each single insertion. I $2 50 per line, ... 3 months 

$1 25 " - - - 1 month. | 3 .50 " - - - - 6 months. 

AJiERiCAN News Company, Mo. 121 Nassau st., and New Yokk News Company, No. 8 Spruce 
8t., N. Y., Wholesale Agents for supplying dealers. T. R. Callender, Agent for Philadelphia. 



The Turf, Field, and Farm. 

HIGH-T01VE1>, BRII.t,IAlVT, ABI.E. 

It is the organ of all respectable Jockey Clubs, and therefore the leading Turf Journal 
of America. It discusses Agriculture, both scientiflcally and practically, and especial 
attention is given to the Sports of tlie Field. Those who believe in the Gun, the Rod, and 
the Bat consult its columns with pleasure and profit. The paper denounces Pugilism, and all 
low, disgusting sports. Billiards receive due attention. 

As a Literary Paper, we claim a high place for the Turf. Field, and Farm. 

Its merit on'this point has been generally concedetl tobe superior to any of its predecessors 
in Sporting Literature. 

Its correspondents are men of superior intellectual culture and attainments, and their 
abilities are recognized as being of the highest order. 

Dramatic News, and Criticisms on the Drama and those connected with it, will be of the 
fullest description, and due care will be taken that they are truthful and just. 

Those who enjoy the more quiet allurements of Chess and Draughts will find the columns 
devoted to these subjects presided over by masters in that branch. 

Breeding is ably discussed by practical and theoretical minds. 



T51E TITRF, FIELD AND FARHI IS A MARVEL OF SUCCESS. 

The wealthy and cultivated gentlemen of America are its readers and patrons. 
Its articles on all subjects are widely quoted in the daily papers of Europe and America. 
The paper is a weekly, the largest in the United States, and is published every Friday morn- 
ing, at $5 a year, in advance; Clubs at $4 a year, in advance. 



Advertising Rates J 

Single insertion, SO cents a line; one month, OO cents a line; three months, $2 25 a line; 
iix months, $3 SO a line; one year, $5 a line. 

S. D. BRUCE & SIMPSON, »7 Park Row. New York. 



262 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



5IASSILI.OX AMKRICAA, 

MASSILI.ON, OHIO. 

A good family newspaper; Republican in pol- 
itics: $2 a vear; circulation 1,500, S50 of 
which is in tho city of Massillon. Population 
of Mas^iilloll ovcr8,()00; rich country surround- 
ing. sizL- ofiiiiiier, 31xU; eiirht pages. 

Rates ok Advektisisg — For one incli, $1; 
eacii additional insertion, .">0 cents; one year, 
$12. 

First-rate advcrtisins; medium, because the 
paper is growing in favor. 

J. W. GARRISOX, Proprietor. 



THE WORKIIVG CHRISTIAN 

IS THE 
ORGAN OF THE FORTY THOUSAND BAP- 
TISTS OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 
SUBSCRIPTION, $3 50. 
Rates of Advertisinsf : 
$1 50 for 10 lines or less, first insertion ; 75 
cents for each subsequent insertion less than 
three months; longer advertisements, same 
rates. For a period longer than three months, 
liberal contracts made. Address 

Rev. TILMAX R. GAINES, 
Yorkville, S. C. 



THE WEEKIiT A:VD SE^TI-TVEEKIiT 
IWOIVITOR, 

PUBLISHED AT LITCHFIELD, ILL., 

Sixtymiles out nf St. Louis, on the St. Louis and 
Indianapolis Railroad, 
Is one of the larger and more extensively 
read AVestern conntrv papers; carries a small 
amount of advertising. Yearly advertisements, 
1.5c per week, per inch; short advertisements, 
for short time, $1 per in. for first insertion, .50c. 
second ; subsequent insertions, 25c. Locals, set 
same as editorial, and mixed with editorials, 
20c. per line. 

BANGS & GR.VY', Publishers. 

THE EXAMi:VER, 

PUBLISHED AT 
GALLATIN, SUMXER COUNTY, TEN^NESSEE, 

AND CIRCULATING AT 

Every Post Office in tlie Great Toliacco 

Region of tlie Cumberland River, 

EAST OF NASHVILLE. 

THOMAS BOY'ERS, Publisher. 
Geo. P. RowELL & Co., 40 Park Row, 

New York Agents. 



THE Mir^Li^^G jorRX.%.1:. 

AND CORN EXCHANGE REVIEW, 
A monthlv paper, devoted to the interests of 
Millers, Millowners, Millwrights, Mill Furnish- 
ers, Flour and Grain Merchants, now enters on 
its Second Volume with rcninvcd oncrgv on 
the pari ot' the pul.lislicrs. No Miller, Mill- 
owner or Millwrii;iit .sliould be witliout it. 

Suli.seriiition only One Oollarayear. Y'early 
advertisements, lO cents per line. 
Circulntiou, 10,727. 
J. D. NOLAN, Editor, 75 Liberty Street, 
New York City. 



CHESTER ADVOCATE, 

An In'dependent Weekly F.\mily Newspaper 

of Twenty-four Columns. 

Circulation ILiarger 

IN THE 

CITY OF CHESTER, PA., 
than both partisan papers. 



Terms, 



50 Cents per Axntjm. 
JOHIV SPEIVCER, Proprietor. 



PERRYSBtJRG JOrRIVAE, 

Publislied Every Friday Itlorniug. 

JAMES TIMMONS, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR. 
Official Paper of Wood County. 

Rates of Advertising: 
1 col., - - - §80 00 I 1-4 col., - - $20 00 
1-2 " - - - 40 00 I 1-S •' - - 12 40 

Legal advertising, 10 cents per line for first in- 
sertion, and 5 cents each subse(inent insertion. 

Special attention paid to Job Printing. 

Office, Louisiana Avenue, I'errv.-iburg, Ohio. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, New 
York, are authorized agents for this paper. 

THE VTEEKIiY IIVDEPEIVDENT, 

Published Every Saturday, at Deer Lodge City, 

Montana Territory, 

Br J. C. Kerly & M. D. Hathaway. 

Terms, $S per year. 

Deer Lodge City is the county seat of tho 
largest, richest, and most populous county in 
Montana. 

The Independent has a large circulation, 
which renders it a desirable advertising me- 
dium. 



SOUTHERNER A1VI> COIttlMCERCIAIi, 

ROME, (iEORGIA. 

A Democratic Tri-\Ve»kly and AVeeUly 

Paper. 

Terms: Tri-jreeHi/. ^^ ; Weekly. S^ per Annum. 

Atlvertisinj; Katos— One square, ten lines 
or le^s. first insertion, $1 .50; each subsequent 
insertion, ?;1. I.ilieial deductions made on con- 
traet- tor :iil\ eriisenienis running longer. 

This iiaiier eireulates in lioine, a oily of 7.000 
population, and aNn t lirunirliont IheClierokee 
Couutrv of (leorgia and .Mabania, and is the 
best advertising uiedinin in that section. 

M. A. NEV'IN, Editor and Proprietor. 



POIIVTE A liA HACHE (tA.) EMPIRE 
PARISH. 

SATURDAY'S; CONSERVATl VK. Established 
' by F. S. CARO, in April, 1.^.5S. cirenlation about 
500. Only paper in the Parish, i »ilieial organ 
of the State and of tlie Parish of PhKinemines, 
La. FRANCIS S. CAUO, Agent and Business 
Manager. Subscription S-l per year. 

Adverllsem«nts— 1 eol., Ivear, $S0; 1-2 COl., 
Cnios.SKi; 1-1 col , C mos., $20; 1-4 col., 3 mos., 
$10. Cards, Id lines, 1 year, SIO. 

(;i;o. P. Howi'.Li. iV Co., 40 Park Row, only au- 
thorized agents in New York. 



THE SAFK RAPinS SEXTIXEL., 

Official Paper of the Coi:ntii:s of Benton, 

MoitRISON, SHERHURNE, AND MiLLE LACS. 
Is Published even/ Fridai/ mnrni)ir/ at Sauk Rapids, 

lient'on Countij. .\tiini'S<,l,i, 
Terminus of the First Divisinn of the St. Paul 
and Pacific Uailroad. Tlie rai)i.l settlement of 
th(^ four eoniilies iniineil.liv reading farmers, 
makes Thf Svntinfl-wliie'li has a lai'ger cir- 
culation in those eoMntiivslhau all the other pa- 
pers put together— the l)est ailvertising medium 
in Northern Minnesota. 

BENEDICT & (;n-PIN, Proprietors. 



ROCHESTER VOt,l4SBT^.\TT (German), 

DAILY AND WEEKLY. 
Largest Ciretttation of any German Xetvspaper Out- 
side the City of Xeir York in this State. 
Rntex "of Atlvertlslns : 

DAILY. I WEEKLY. 

1 inch, 1 time, $ 7.'> | 1 inch, I t ime, $ .50 

1 week, 2 Oil I •• 1 m<mth. 2 00 

1 month, 5 (111 I '• 2 " 3 00 

:i " 10 fHi I •• ;{ •• 5 00 

" IS (10 •• r, " 8 00 

1 year, ;iO do | •• 1 year, 12 00 
Changing requires a special contract. 

l^oriS ^V. BRAI>II>T, Proprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Chicago Daily and Weekly Post 

CHICAGO, II.I.i:V0IS. - KAILY A3fl> WKEKLY. 



THE EVENING POST IS THE LARGEST, ABLEST, AND MOST ENTERPRISLNG PAPEB 
IN THE WEST. 



During the four ycar.s of the existence of the EVENING POST, it has risen from the siniiUest 

beginning to the very fiont rank of Western journals 

I,V CIKCILATIOW, IIVFI.IJENCE, AWD SIZB. 

It lias the Liargest Daily Circulation of any EvenUig Paper In Cliicago, and tlie 
ILiargest in the West. 



Daily per Ytar. $10 OO 

Weetly, " * 2f> 

rOST PRIiVTIJVG C03IPAarY, 104 MADISOIV STREET. 



The Mirror and Farmer, 

PlJBt,ISHE» AT 1IA:VCHESTER, IVEW HAMPSHIRE, 

JOHN B. CLARKE, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR, 
■Is an eight page paper, of forty-eight columns, of size of the New York Tribune, and has a larger 
circulation than any other secular paper in New England north of Boston. 

THE Oj\r,T FARMIIVG PAPER IIV THE STATE. 

Advertisements ten cents a line, $1 20 an inch of space, for each insertion. No advertise- 
ment inserted for less than one dollar. It circulates in large numbers in all the farming towns, 
manufacturing villages and cities of New Hampshire, and very largely in Vermont, and some im 
all the other States. For general advertising, for the price charged (which is the same to all), 
It has no equal in the Eastern States. 

THE »AIi:,Y MIRROR AlVD AMERICAIV, 

Edited and published by the same, is the oldest and most largely circulated Daily in the State. 

It was Established in 1850. 

Manchester i« more than twice as populous as any other city in the State, and is growing 
very rapidly. It is the centre of trade and business. It manufactures over one hundred miles 
of cloth, delaines, cassimeres, ginghams, sheetings, shirtings and the like a day; over one 
hundred locomotives annually; a large number of steam fire engines: has three hosiery mills; 
edge tool, file, card, belting, and numerous other mechanical works. The pay-roll for the 
different mechanical and manufacturing establishments, for labor only, is about one quarter 
of a million of dollars each month. Tlie result is that it is a very lively, thriving place, with 
ready monev all the time in the hands of the people. 

The Daily Mirror and American reaches the whole population, and is circulated on the 
cars to Concord, Nashua, Dover, Portsmouth, and other cities of the State. It is a choice mediuia 
for advertising. All advertisements appear in the three Daily editions. 

RATES OF ADVERTISING : 

Square, one time, - - - - ifO 7.5 I Square, one month, - - - - $.'5 00 

" three times, - - - - 1 .'iO " six months, - - - - 1.5 09 

" one week. - - - - 2 2.5 1 " one year, - - - - 10 09 

Two-thirds of an inch in length, one squnre. The prices are uniform to all, and no discount 

is made to anv one. 



264 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

The Commercial List, 

AM) 

PKK li:-< I KRKIVT. 

Is Published Every Saturday Morning by AVIIVST^OAV & SON, 

At IVo. 241 I>ock Street, Pliiladelpliia. 

MCCALLA & STAVELY, PUINTERS AND STOCIvIIOI.DERS. 

Bn«lnesM Circulars, by the quantity, will be furnished on very reasonable terms, our 
LETTKR SHEET PRICE-CURREjXT 

Havinfc their cards and business circulars prominently inserted for their private use. 

Commercial 'L.iat, - - - - - - $4 OO per Annuin. 

ILietter Sheet Price-Current, - - - - 8 OO ♦' '< 



The Evening Herald. 

Price, .......... One Cent. 

A DEMOCRATIC AFTERIVOOiV PAPER. 

It contains the latest telegraphic news from all sections of the United States and Europe, ancf 
discusses the general topics of the day. As an advertising medium, there is none better. 
It has the Largest Circulation of any I>eniocratic papi-r in the State of Pennsylvania. - 
It being one of the mediums by which the Sheriff imblishes the sales for the county, make» 
it a desirable paper. 

Terms to Subscribers » 
One copy, one year, ..-...-. $3 oo 

" six months, - - - • - - - - 1 5(> 

" three months, -...---- ^^^ 

Rates of Advertising s 

Ten cents per line, transient advertisements; $1 per line, one month. 

Published by C. F. REIIUSTEIIX & CO., 105 South Fourth St., PhiladelpIUa. 

C. F. REINSTEIN. J. K. CllASWICK. 



The Christian Intelligencer. 

REV. E. R. ATWATER, _ _ _ EDITOR. 

THE CIIRISTIA]\ IXTELLIGEIVCER is a weekly RELIGIOUS FAMILY NEWSPAPER. 

On the first of January it began its forty-tirst volume. It is the organ of the HEF(»KMED 
CHURCH in America, which was the lirst Church of the Presbyterian family planted in thia 
country, and derived its origin in Holland, where the iieisecuteil :iii<l ojiprcssed Protestants 
once found a welcome and shelter. The Intelligencer, while lirni in its advcuaey of the doc- 
trines and polity of the denomination it represents, is Catliolic in sjiirit, and aims to pi"omote 
evangelical religion and vital godliness. It numbers among its regular contributors many of the 
best writers of all denominations. It gives each week intcri'sting and instructive readingfor 
Parents an<l Children, a summary of Foreign and Douiest ic news, and items of information in 
relation to .\gri(ultnre, Science anil Art. The aim of the Editor and I'ublisluT is to make the 
Intelligcucej- the l)est Family I'Lt^igions T'aper published, so that it nuiy be a welcome visitor to 
every Ciiristian household; an ellieient all\ of the ])ulpit, and the ediieator of the children in 
every nuinly \irtnc. Terms t $:i m a year, by mail; $.i M. by carrier; to Ministers, $-2 00, andf 
Thco'U.gical" Students, $1 .')<l. Address 

< IIAREICS VAIV \VV<'K, IMiblisher. 

ir»<) U'illiniu .Street, !«eiv York. 



0\i,V MORjyilVCi PEWBTT PAPER IM PHIfyADEIiPHIA. 



The Day. 



PlBr.,ISlIEl> UV AI.EXAiM»ER Cl'MMi:\<;S, 

NOKTH-W EST COIINEK Sl.XTH AM) CllESTNTT .STREET. PHILADELPHIA. 

i>i;voi'i;i> To THE 

Interests of flio Working i'lasses and Tracles I'eople. 

PmCE, ONE CENT. 

Rules for Advertising! 

Ten cents per line for each insertion. (ScTem words to the line.) 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 265- 



TO ADVERTISERS. 

The r,arge8t Circiilatioii of any Paper in New Hampshire, and tli,- I^ar^eat in Ifew 
Enjs^Iand, Out of Boston. 



The Star Spangled Banner. 

rrRCI'I.ATIO]\, .30,000 COPIES 1HONTHI.Y. 

The attention of the ad>vertising public is invited to the circulation and merits as an adver- 
tising medium ot the above paper. For eight years its circulation has steadily increased, 
until, at the present time, its actual bona fide issue of each and every number is »0,'oOO copies 
puring the Winter ot 18«9-70 it has booked 1,000 new subscribers weekly, and it 'still keeps 
doing so. It reaches a class often reached by no other paper. It goes to those who read and 
affl^ABiV-^ and it takes pleasure in calling your attention to the following 

T,,.^. .„„ ... ^, ^ ^ , . Brattleboro, Vt., March 10, 1870. 

Ihis IS to certify that I have printed the Star Spangled Banner, for Hunter & Co . for 
f«.\5^^f't''^=•^^''K^"'*'® August, isev.l have never printed less than 10,000 of each monthly 
«H. V f ''""■"? ^'??Jn''!}>^'^^*^'' ^ printed 15,100 copies of each number : that since Decembef^ 
«hfl'l nrint ?riV, in"rf. rv ?.' ^^P^^^,' '>'«^ «* the present (April) number I print 3.5,000 copies, and 
snail print 30 OOO, or more, of each issue during 1870. F r> PORT inavi 

Sworn to before me, this 10th day of March, A. D., 1870. ' ^"^^^^""• 

rr.1 „ 1 , ^ ^ , . J. M. TYLER. Justice of the Peace. 

^ninHon trPiT« •?.''nf,n , ''^'''^^'*' ^^^S^^l ^"^^ business men. Observe that we do not claim our cir- 
culation to be 30,000 but we prove it to be .so. The Star Spangled Banner circulates every- 
nHf,ol7?//''^°°"'^^l'^^°';H',2"^°''"\^«"' England, I,.500 in Pennsylvania, 1,500 Ohio, l,50o7n 
fnrPi^n'^..^,!,? • .,^^^^^^1 thousand go to the various News Companies, while hundreds go to 
r?J3Kif;?„ T^~'*' ^-''^'",^ '''^^^?^''^«'"^ i" Mexico, Ireland, France, Holland, Alaska, &c, &c. 
Its publishers believe in advertising, and know that the Banner pays. , * , o^i... 

<,i^i*thl^'',.^„C;?^^?" * Co. the well known advertising agents of New York, in a private letter 
IrJr^i^. • '?'^'®«''^'""' ^'^^^ Banner as follows: "We once advertised in your paper and 
were surprised to And our card attracted more attention there than in any other papei- we had 
put It in. They advertise m the Banner regularly, as do nearly all who once try it. 

lUessrs. b. C. Thompson & Co., extensive advertisers, who have used often a whole page in the 
H..^oJ.^f^V i^y *^^* ?* pays better than any other paper at same co.st," and we might name 
r^^?J?^. n *i,^ ^'^" ^^fC^ had the same experience. Among its patrons we may name the fol- 
..T.^ f ■ ^^- -^- ^\'i'^^^'^* ^"-^ ^'^'^ Richardson's Advertising Agencies, New York; H. T. Helm- 
vV'^'o^;^^,}''''^! H.RCostar, New York; the Tribune.^evf York; J. Estey & Co., Brattleboro, 
\t.. t5.C. Thompson & Co., Boston, Mass.; Wilder .Salamander Safe Company, New York; C. c! 
Tluirston, New ;i ork; E. Remington & Sons, Hion, N. Y.; J. Winchester & Co., New York; Dr. La 
T^!^?i^k A x7' ;^^ ■ i ^S'"*^^® Dodd, Advertising Agent, Boston ; the Sun, New York ; ToMo Blade,. 
Toledo, O. ; New York ireeMy, New York, Elliott, Thomes & Talbot, Boston, and nianv others. 

Ihe publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisement at option. Swindling, hum- 
Dug and disreputable advertisements, advertisements containing " slang" phrases, in fact, ad- 
vertisements not intended to benefit our readers will not be inserted at any price. We offer 
an excellent advertising medium at a low price, but we are not begging business by any means, 
as we can til our space at any time. Neithershall we accept advertisements which will damage 
our own business. 

With the above statements we beg leave to submit the following 

TERMS OF ADVERTISIIVG 

(CA.SH IN ADVANCE): 

Terms One Cent a line per 1,000 of circulation. (Can you I>o Better 1) 

Present circulation :i0,000. Our cliarges arfe therefore as follows : 
Tiiirty Cents per line for eaeli and every insertion. IVothing inserted for less than 81. 

One column, one month (180 lines space), - - -" - . *.=io 

One-half column, one month (90 lines space), - .... o'l 

One-quarter column, one month, (45 lines space), - - - j.) 

Seven words average a line. (Parts of lines are counted as whole ones ; 

Discounts — On advertiseme ts inserted for three months we will discount 10 per cent • for 
SIX months, 20 per cent. ; for one year, 25 per cent. 

Displayed advertisements will be charged for space occupied, at the rate of $3 60 for each 
inch in length of column. Editorial Notices $.50 cents per line each insertion. 

The paper goes to press on the first day of each month, and is issued on or before the 10th of 
the montli preceding its date. All advertisements intended for insertion should reach us pre- 
vious to the hist ot the month. A copy of the paper will bi; sent to each advertiser. All adver-' 
tisements will be inserted in uniform style and type, and in conspicuous places. Believing 
from our own experience, and from that of our customers, for the past eight years, that our 
paper IS a flrst-class as well as r-honn medium through which to reach the public, we respect- 
fully solicit your patronage. Very tiuly yours, HIT]\TER •& CO., 

Publishers Star Spangled Banner, Hinsdale, W. H. 



SPECIAIi — " Trade Advertisements," offers of watches, seeds, Ac, propositions to adver- 
tise and • pay quarterly," or any other way except for cash respectfully declined. 

MIIVD.— Do not call our rates "high" until you stop and think. Harper's Weekly {ns good an 
advertising medium as anywhere) circulates 100,000 and charges $1 50 a line, or 1 1-2 cents a line 
perl.OOO of circulation, or just 50per cent, higher in proportion than we do. We defy any one 
to show a better or cheaper medium than the Star Spangled Banner. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



TUSCOtiA COUNTT PIO^VEER, 

Published Every Wednesuat, 

BT 

ALEXANDER TROTTER, 

AT 

Tassar, Tuscola County, >Ii«Uisaii. 

RErrHLICAN IN POLITICS. 
Circulntiou about HOO. 

The oldest, largest, and most extensively cir- 
culated paper in the county. 
Terms, $2 a Year ix Advance. 

WEEKI,T ADVOCATE. 

THE UREENVILLE ADVOCATE, 
A Weekly Paper. Publi.ihed in one of the Best 
Counties in the .'^tnte of Alabama, 
Presents its claims to the advertising public 
as one of the best advertising mediums in South 
Alabama. Tlie circulation is large, and reaches 
j^ortions of (he country that no other paper 
does. Advertisements inserted by the year at 
the following rates : One column, one year, $1.50; 
half column, $80; quarter column, $.50. Cards, 
of one square or less, inserted for $80. Rates 
of .Subscription, $2 .50 per annum. Address Jas. 
B. Stanley, Proprietor, Greenville, Ala. 



TO UNITED STATES ADVERTISERS. 
THE ALMOIVTE GAZETTE. 

To all "Men who Advertise" in the Tnited 
States, and who desire to have their advertise- 
ments circulated in one of the most thickly 
populated sections of Ontario, we recf)mmend 
the (dlumns of the AI..M( >NTE (i A/KTTE. pub- 
lished at Alnioiite, Lanark (.■ounly, Ontario. It 
is the only i)ai)er pulilished in tlu'Nortli Ui<ling 
of the County of Lanark. IJates of advertising 
(American currency), 20 Cents per Inch each 
insertion. Pavmeiit in advance. 

WiM. TEMPLE.MAN. Proprietoi. 



BIASOIV CITY WEVrS. 

Published Weekly by Haughey & Walker. 
Devoted to Home Interests. 

Good Run of Advertisements and Job Work. 

well supplied with type, etc. 

Circulation, OOO 

The proprietors will sell at reasonable rates. 
Address NEWS, Mason City, 111. 



SEMI-\tTEEKr,Y PELLA BL.A1>E, 

Published Tuesdays and Fridays, 

By BETZER BROTHERS, 

Pella, Marion County, Iowa. 

R.\TES OF Advertising: 



sqr., 6 months, $ 6 00 
■ ■ 10 00 

80 00 



1 sqr., 1 insertion, $1 00 

1 " 1 month, 2 0011 " 1 year, 

1 " 3 " 3 .50 I IcoL, 1 " 

Subscription : 
1 copy, 3 months, $0 7.5 I 1 copy, 1 year, $2 00 
1 " G '• 1 00 I 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, N. Y., are 
our regularly authorized agents. 



ADVERTISERS 1 
ST. liOriS CHUISTIAIV ADVOCATE. 

One of thf largest napcrs published by the 
Methodist Ei>iscopal Church, North or South; 
has a very large circulation throughout the 
Western and Soutlicrn States, thei-rby offering 
one of the best nii'diunis to !ul\i'rtisers to be 
found in tlie Wi-t. Advirl iscineuts inserted at 
1.5 cents piTliu'' fNoiiparci!) : for yrurly adver- 
tisements a lihi-r:il discount will be made. 

Address. Southwestern Itook and Puh- 
llflhinj^ Company, Pid^lishers, St. Louis, Mo. 

RUTI.AIVD HERAT.n. 

WEEKLY, Established, 1704, 92 50 per year, 
DAILY, " 1800, S OO " 

Both have a large circulation in Rutland, Ad- 
dison, Windsor, and Windham counties. The 
weekly has a larger circulation in Rutland 
County than all otlier weeklies published in the 
•county combined. 

Bend for advertising rates. 

TUTTLE A COMPANY, 
Publishers, Rutland, Vermont. 



THE MOriVT FOREST EXAMINER 

Is published every Thursday morning, at the 
office. Main street. Mount Forest, Ontario. 

RATES OF advertising : 

For Casual Advertisements— 10 cents per line, 
first insertion; each subsequent insertion, 2 
cents j)er line. 

Yearly Advertisements— $W per column; one- 
half column, per vear. $25 ; one-quarter column, 
do., $15. Circulation, 1,000. 

McADAMS & MCLAREN, 

Publishers and Proprietors. 



THE RIVER TIMES, 

PUBLISHED AVEEKLY AT 

St. liouis, Mo., 

BY JOHN H. CARTER, Editor and Proprietor. 
Terms. S2 a Tear in Advance. 

The River Times has an extensive circulatioa 
on all the Western rivers, and, as an advertising 
medium for business men, it is unexcelled by 
any newspaner in the Missis-^ippi \ulley. 

Rates of Aclvertisins;: 
1 sqr. 1 month, $ 3 00 I 2 sijrs . 1 month, $ 5 00 
1 " 1 year, 30 00 | 2 " 1 year, 50 00 

One square occupies a space of one inch. 



CliARIOIV REPUBMCAJV, 

CLARION, CLARION COUNTY, 
Pennsylvania . 

GEO. O. MORGAN, Editor and Propribtob. 
Organ of the Republican Party. 

Best Advertising Medium in the County. 

PUBLISHED SATL'RDAYS. 

$2 Per Year. 

Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, 

N. Y., are authorized to receive advertisements. 

SIIEI.BY corATY rxio:v, 

I AVEEKLY, 

$2 OO Per Year. 

AT SIIELBYVILLF., STIKLBY COUNTY, ILL. 
V. S. >IA«TI\'. i:«litor j.i.d Proprietor. 

Oul.\- L'cpublic-an piip'''' pul'l'^'ied in a county 
of ciglit lumdrcd s(|nare miles of territoix 
with a po)iulatinn fit oxerthirty thousand. 

Rnt«-w—Vearlv, $^0 per column; half column, 
$40; (inartriM'oiumu. $25. 

Messrs. (Jko. P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, 
New York, are anthoi-ized to procure advertise- 
ments for this paper. 

SCOTTSRORO IXOFSTRI.IT. HKRAI^D. 

An l}„l(pi}i,l,>il (\nif<-7-r,itir,' U'n/:!)/ .J,<>irnnl, size 
2t\!r., pul<li^h<,l riiin:<'l,n/s. at Sroll.<l„>ro. the 
Countii .Scut of.Iackaon Cnunty, at $2 5(i per year. 
The Tennessee River, as we'll as the Memphis 
and Charleston Railroad, nins through the 
! length of the county, and the Nashville and 
f'hattiinooga Railroad crosses it. The Herald 
is the oidy paper published at the county scat, 
and is the ofllcial organ. It is a superior ad- 
vertising medium. There is connected with Its 
publication a reliable agency for the sale of all 
i arficlcs advertised. Address A. .SNODGRASS, 
' Editor and Proprietor, Scottsboro, Ala. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



S6T 



Philadelphia Democrat Building, 




POSITIVEr,T, THE LARGEST CIKCUr,ATIOW. 

A CARD FROM THE 

Western Rural 

TO Ar,L ADVERTISERS. 

We desire to call the attention of those who wish to reach the mass of Farmers and Families 
generally, throughout the West and Northwest, to Tlie ^Vfstern Rural, as a channel for adver- 
tising articles specially in the Rural line, and for those who wish to reach the public generally. 
The Western Rural is the most Iiargely Circulated and Popular Agricultural and 

Family Weekly west of New York. A trial advertisement is all thut is needed to prove the 
superiority of this journal as an advertising inediuiu. Acl\ ei t isers should be aware that but 
few farmers take moi-e than one journal ot this class, and lliat, 1 lierefore, OUR readers can be 
reached through no othek channkl. Tlie iVtstt-iii Itural is substantially two separate 
newspapers combined in one, two editions beiiin puljlished ; The Chicago edition for the West 
generally; the Detroit edition specially for Michigan and Canada. Advertisements inserted in 
either or both editions. Advertisers using botli editions virtually have the advantage of Tivo 
Wew^spapers for a trifle more than tlie Rates of one. 

As an indication of the value of the Western Rural as an advertising medium, we give here- 
with (from many of a similar character) a letter from the well-known firm of D. M. Osborne & 
Co., Manufacturers; also one from S. C. Thompson & Co. 

Office of D. M. Osborne & Co., Chicago, 111., Feb. U, 1870. 
H. N. F. LEWIS, Esq., Publisher Western litiral.—DKAK Sir: Having used your paper as am 
advertising medium, to advertise our Kirby Reapers and Mowers, in 18(j9, we are please<l to say 
that the result was to our perfect satisfaction. Respectfully yours, 

D. M. OSBONRE & CO. (By D. RANSOM, General Western Agent.) 

Chicago, Februai-y Ifi, 1870. 
H. N. F. Lewis, Esq., Publisher of Western RurnL— Dear Sir: Please insert the inclosed 
advertisement in your next issue, in both editions of your paper, on fifth page, to be set like 
«opy, three columns wide and about one-half long. I have found the W^estern Rural to be 
one of the best advertising mediums I ever patronized, and I have advertised in the leading 
publications in the United States, both East and West. Yours, respectfully, 

S. C. THOMPSON (of S. C. Th'OMI'SON & Co.), Boston and Chicago. 

Only our regular rates charged for space occupied by cuts. For specimen copies, rates, &«. 
address H. TX. F. liEW^IS, Publisher Western Rural, 

At either Chicago, 111., or I>etroit, Mich. 



i68 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Lewis County Gazette. 

IH 151.ISHi:i) EVERY K1{1I>AY. AT CANTON, MO. 

By FYFE &, JOXES, Proprietors. 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OK NORTH-EAST .MISSOURI. 

ADVKUTISIiX<i UATKS THK VKRV I^OWKST. 

The Saint John Advertiser, 

TUe only I'npcr in the Marltinue Provinces I>evotecl Kxelusively to .Idvertisiiiia;. 

Is issued monthly fur {gratuitous <U.-;tril)Uti<)n, with il f^uar uitccd cirt'ulation of .'i.tMio copit'S. 
Tcrins of Advertisiug, $;oltl 
Per mo. Per yr. 
Business cards, - - $1 00 $8 00 

One-eiprhth column - I .50 12 00 

One-fourth " - - 3 .)0 20 00 

All i)ayments to be made at expiration of time agreed for except iu the case of yearly 
advertisers, who.«e accounts will be presented fiuarterly. 

GOROOIV TyrVI]V«STOiV, Kclitor and Proprietor. P. O. Box 227, St. John, N. B. 

TWEIVTY-THKKK YKAKS OT.D. ABT.K. BRir.I.IA.\T. AIVI> l.:VTKRTAIiVI]VG. 

The Philadelphia City Item. 

A LITERAUV, SO( IKTV, AND FINK ART JOIRNAE. 
Edited by TIIO.M.iS I ITZ«;KR.\LI>, 

Author of "Patrice; or, The Wliitc I.adv oi Wiiklow," " l,i'.rht at Last," " Wolves at Bay," 
"Tangled Threads," "The Kcg.nt," "Who shall Win?" " Perils ^)f the Night," " Bound to 
the Uack," cte., etc.; assisted by an able corps of editors and eoiitribntors. 
Tile t'ity Item, having a large circulation throughout the I'liitcd states, is, therefore, a 
valualilc aih (tlising medium. Advertising Rrtes : 20 cents a line <vt'r\- insertion. 
Substription: $3 ayear. FITZ«;eRAi;i> & CO.. 

112 and 114 South Tliird Stieet. Pliilndelphia. Pa. 



I'er mo Per yr. 
One-half cohinm. - - $4 00 $8(1 00 

One column, - • - (i 50 CO 00 



The Platte County, Wlo., Reveille. 

I'UBEISHEl) EVEUV EIIIDAV, AT PLATTE CirV, .ML^solKL 

T. ^y. PARK, Editor and Proprietor. 

The only paper published at the Capital of Platte County, the third county in wealth and 
population in Missouri. There is no better advertising medium in Western Missouri. 
For Advertising Rates address the proprietor. 



Glencoe Weekly Register. 

.lAMKS 4'. i:i»SO.\, Kditor anil I'roprletor. 

PUBLISHED EVIORV TIUKsdaV A I' (.LI:N((>i:, Mii.i:()l) COINTV, .MINNESOTA. 
t . .V. UIO.Wiri'T, l»nl>li»h<i. 

The only paper published in tlu' county ; has a huge linulation in the eoiiuties of Sibley 
and Lincoln, m which there is no paiier published. 

Rates of Advertising. 

One square one week, - - - $1 00 

Each subsefpient insertion, - .'iO 

One sfjuare one year, (; oo 

Quarter eolunin one year, I.') (Hi 



Half column one year. - - • $2') 00 

One column one year, ■ - (0 00 

liusiness Cards often lines or less. U 00 



The Bond of Peace. 

Published .MonOily by 10. .lA.MKS &. to., No. UOO Arch St., Philadelphia. 

Terms of .Subseiiplion : Single eoi)y one year, $1 00; One number, 10 cents. 

Advertisements »t the following Rates': One line, lirst insertion, 12 cents; each subse- 
quent, per line, .'^ cents; lUisiness Card ime scar, $11 (K) ; Rusiness Card si.x months, $;i 00. 
I*ay»ble in .Advance. 

This Monthly Journal will bi- devoted to remove the causes and abolish the customs of War 
and the Death Penalty. It will advocate the cipud lights of all men and women — laborand cap- 
itnl. Free trade with all parts of the; world as one? great lamil\- of nninkind. 

Address E. .JAMES & Co., No. 000 Arch street, Philadelphia, Pa. All articles for insertiou 
must be accompanied by a bon'a-fide and responsible nanu-. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Cincinnati Weekly Times, 

THE FAVORITE FA.lIItiY IVEWSPAPEK OF THE n'EST, 

HAS JirST ENTEUEU ITS TWENTV-SEVKNTH YEAH, 

IN AX ENLARGED AND IMPROVED FORM, 

Mnkliig it, without doubt, oue of the Handsomest, Cheapest and Best IVewspapers 

in the Union. 
CIBCUE.ATIOJV OF THE WEEKt,Y TIMES, T0,000. 

The larger portion of its subscribers is in the Western States, althougli there is not a State or 
Territoiy in the Union in whicli it does not circulate to some extent. 

In Ohio it has over 17,0J0 subscribers, going to 1,616 different post-offices. 

In Indiana it has 7,000 subscribers, going to 9,630 different post-offlces. 

In Illinois it has 10,000 subscribers, at 970 post-offices; while in Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, 
Missouri, Kentucky and Tennessee, it has between 15,000 and 16,000 subscribers. 

In New York and Pennsylvania its circulation is nearly 8,000, going to 1,089 different post- 
offices. 

To one who wants to communicate with the thousands of intelligent Farmers and Ilorticul- 
culturists, besides the Merchants, Manufacturers, and professional men in the almost countless 
number of little towns and villages scattered throaghout the Great West, we can with confidence 
recommend our journal. 

Advertising in ^Veelcly Times: As ordinary advertisements,. "iO cents line, each insertion. 

Subscription : Single subscription, - - - - - - $2 00 

Clubs of five, - - - - • - - - - -175 

Clubs of ten (and an extra copy to getter-up of club), - - - - 1 50 

CIIVCIIVIVATI l>Air,T TIMES. 

ESTABLISHED BY THE PRESENT PROPRIETOR IN 1$40. 
Cixr Subscribers supplied by Carriers at 20 cents per week ; Mail Subscribers, $8 per tear. 
Being independent on all questions, and subject to the dictation of no clique or party, its 
patronage is not confined to party limits, but it is taken, without regard to political opinions, in 
all quarters. 

From its compact form, and the manner in which it is made up, having reading matter on 
each page, thereby allowing advertisements in every part of the paper to be readily seen, in ad- 
dition to its large circulation, not only in the City, but in the adjoining Towns, the Times must 
continue to be a most desirable medium for Advertisers. 

Advertising in Daily Tinies : 
One square, one insertion (space of ten lines), - - - - - $ 75 

One square, three " " " - - - - - - 2 25 

One square, six >. u u . ..... 4 50 

C. W. STARBUCK & CO., Proprietors. 

62 ^Vest Thii-d Street, Cincinnati, O. 



The Nashville Union and American. 

A POt,ITICAIi, NEWS, COMMERCIAL, AIVI> FAMIt,Y JOURIVAXi. 

A PAPER FOR THE PEOPLE, THE MERCHANT, THE FARMER, THE MECHANIC. 

THE PROFESSIONAL MAN, AND THE 

BX:ST FAMIIii' PAPER IIV TENNESSEE. 

ISSUED DAILY, SEMI-WEEKLY, AND WEEKLY. 
The largest circulation in the State. The fullest, best, and cheapest paper in the State. Sub- 
scription price greatly reduced. 

Daily, per Annum, $8 CO [ Our Mammoth Weekly, • $a GO 

Semi-'Weekly, - - - - 4 OO | Specimen copies sent on application. 



Advertisers will find the Union and American the best advertising medium in the State 
to reach the general and substantial public, and all the business men. Terms liberal. 

No business house or firm looking to the Southern Trade should fail to advertise in this 
■uuivei-sally popular paper. It is read by everybodj'. 

Address, J. O. GRIFFITH <fc Co., IVashville, Tenn. 



870 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER KATE-BOOK 



;^e!s?^^ 



^^i^^"^' y 

AK EIGHT-PAGE PAPER, DEVOTED TO THE FAMIEY, AGRICUETURE, THE NEWS, AND 
THE GENERAL INTERESTS OF DUTCHESS COUNTY. 

Published at PousliUeepsie, ]V. T., Every Tuesday >Ioiiiins, at §2 per Tear. 

E«BKRT B. KltitiEY, Editor and I»roi>rietor. 

This paper has a larger circulation among the furniors of Dutchess county than any other 

paper. Advertisers who wish to reach this class can use its columns to advantage. 

Advertising Rates : 

One suuare, one insertion, $1; 1 month. $:5; 3 months, %^\ 6 months, $8; 12 months, $14. 

Twelve lines Nonpareil make one square. 



rE«TABLISHEI> I3i IS5r.] 

The Scottish American Journal^ 

AIV EXCE1,LKAT FAMILY I'APEK, 
Pnblislied Weefcly by - - - - - - A. M. STE^'ART, 

NO. 37 PARK ROW, . - - - NEW YORK. 

THE SCOTTISH AMERICAIV JOURIVAX, is circulated extensively in every State in thfr 
Union, and in every part of British America. It is read principally by the best classes of English, 
Scotch and British American residents, and is one of the best advertising mediums published. 

liiberal Rates to Regular Advertisers. 



The Irish People. 



THE OFFICIAL ORGA^V OF THE FENIAIV BROTHERHOOD OF AMERICA. 

COL. JOHN O'MAHONEY, Editou. 

The largest circulation of any Irish paper in the United States. 

Subscription Rates : 

For four months, - ------- $1 00 

" six " l-^« 

" twelve " 2 50 

Advertising Rates : 
On Third or Seventh page, each insertion, per line, for 12 months, 8c. ; for 6 months, 9c. ; for 3 
months, 10c. ; for less than 3 months. Kic. On Eighth page, lor 12 months, per hne, for each in- 
sertion, 10c. ; for six months, He; for 3 months. 12e,; for less than 3 months, 20c. Special 
Notices, each insertion, 30 cents per line. Notices in n-a.liiig in;ittcr,eacli inst-rtion, M cents per 
ji^g M. .1. O'l^E.lUY 6l CO., Publislitrs. 

Post-office Box g,074. Office: 280 Pearl street, N. V. ( ity. 



Wletropolitan Record. 

JOIIIV .MI'I-.I..AI.,Y, _ _ - - - ICditor and Proprietor. 

OFFICE, - - 421 BROOME STREET. 

THF ]»IETROPOLITAX RECORI* is jjublished once a week, and contains fifty-six col- 
umns ol irencral new-* editorial matter, and varied and interesting reading. It is one of the 
first 'l)enio<ritic Weeklies i.iiliiishe.l in llie I'ity of New York, anil is now in the twellth year of 
itse\ist<Mu<-' Its cinnhitiun in the Southern States is not exceeded by that of any other paper 
of it's el;iss piibli.-liiMl in the Met r<i|><ili^, and otVers great advantages to business men seeking 
custom in that section ol tlie cnmitiy. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION: 
To single subscribers, in the city, $3 50 | To single subscribers, by mail, ■ - $3 00 

RATES OF AI>VERTISIIV« s 

For one month, per line, each insertion, 2.-1 cts. I For three months, ... - 15 cts. 

For two months, - - . ■ 20 cts. | For one year. \^ \ " " ^'^ •'^- 

Special Notices, per line, for each insertion 50 cents. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 271 



Fr,ORlI>A. 

The Tallahassee Sentinel^ 

Tallahassee, Florida. 



THE SENTINEL IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT TALLAHASSEE, FLA., THE CAPITAL OF 

THE STATE; 

IS THE tiABGEST PAPER IIV FLORIDA, 

AND HAS 

The Iiargest Circulation of any Paper in the State. 

It contains a large amount of reading matter each week, comprising ForeigTi and Home 
News, Political and General News, and carefully selected Miscellany. Its Agricultural Depart- 
ment will receive special attention. 

Being the State Official Paper, 
All ILia-ws, Proclamations, aud Official Advertisements 

are published first in its columns. It is Indispensable to all who wish to keep posted as to the 
doings at the Capital. 

PRICE, $a GO Per Annum. 

As an Advertising Medium, it is unequaled. It reaches all classes of people— merchants, 
planters, and business men generally. It is issued daily during the session of the Legislature, 
and yearly advertisements are inserted in the Daily without extra charge. 

Advertising Bates : 

Iw. Im. .3m. 6m. lyr. 
1 square, - - - - $ 1 $ 3 $ 6 $ 10 $1.5 I 12 squares, - 
3 " - - - 3 8 '20 2.5 40 24 " 

6 " ... G 15 30 60 70 I 

jB®- One inch of space constitutes a square. 
Address CHAS. H. WAXTOIV, Editor and Proprietor. 



Iw. 


Im. 


.3m. 


6m. 


Irr. 


$12 


$25 


$.50 


$ 75 


$100 


24 


60 


7.5 


100 


150 



The Evening Mail. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF A LLEGHEIVT, 



PUBLISHED AT No. 86 FIFTH AVENUE, PITTSBURGH, PA., 

Bvery afternoon at two cents per copy, and delivered by carriers at ten cents per week, or by- 
mail at $5 per year. 



A LIVELY A1VI> IIVDEPEIVDEIVT IVEWSPAPEB, 

Commenting on all the issues of the day, political, financial, and moral. Its latest telegraphs, 
full local reports, literary, dramatic, musical and fashionable gossip, together with its low 
price, make it the Favorite of all Classes. 

It has now a larger and more rapidly Increasing circulation than any other evening paper 
in Western Pennsylvania, and Is therefore the very best advertising medium. 

News-dealers supplied at the rate of one dollar per hundred. 
Specimen copies sent to dealers or others, for one week, free of charge. 

KREPS & CALDWELL, Editors and Proprietors 



27: 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



THE VIRGIATIA. GAZKTTB. 

[ESTABLISHED A. I). iT.il>.] 

I'OULISHED EVEKV WEEK AT WILLIA.MSlilJRG, 

VIRGINIA, l»Y 

R. A. LIVELY, ami 
Edited by E. il. LIVELY. 
The onlj'*i)aper in tlit^ Virf^iiiia First Congres- 
sional District— an excellent advertising me- 
dium for mercbants, business men, &e. 
Terms, $2 n<> per Aiiuuin. 
P. S.— Advertising subject to special contract. 

BALir.STO:V JOCBafAl, PKIIVTIIVG 
KSTABLISn.MK^'T, 

Ballston Spa, Saratuga County, IS. Y. 

H. L. GKOSE & SONS, PuoritiETOits, 

PUULI.SHKKS OF 
THE BA1.1.STOIV JOUKIVAX,, 

One of the largest weeklies in Northern New 
York, and a valuable advertising medium. 
Rates reasonable. 

Every variety of Book and Job Printing 
executed in the latest and best manner. 



THE BIL.r,IARB CITE, 

AND 

BILLIARD PLAYERS' CHRONICLE. 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

PHELAN & COLLENDER, 

BIIiLIARD TABLE IWAIVUFACTCBEBS, 

T38 Broadway, IVe-»v York. 

Subscription — i50 cents jier year. 

Advertisements— 50 cents per line each 

insertion. 



HOL.Ii¥ SPBinrGS COWSEBVATIVE, 

Holly .Springs, Miss. 

.JOHN CALIIOON, EDITOR AM) Proprietor. 
J. II. KiRKPATRiCK, Business Manager. 
Fked. O. Hail, General Agent. 



BVFFAXO FBEIE PBESSE. 
WEEKLY. 

Book and Job Printiitg Establisliinent. 

Corner Main and Mohawk Street.s, 
BUFFAL-O, IV. Y. 
REINECKE & ZESCH, Proprietors. 



THE WEEKLY TIMES, 

>iibliHhed at Oil City, Venango <"o. 



BY T. A. MORRI.SON. Husi 



TERMS OF A1)VERTISI> 



.Manager. 



GOOI> HEALTH, 

A Popular Journal of Medical Science, 
Giring Lessons of Instruction to the /'eople, 
Having original arMclcs by the most eminent 
medical and scicntilic iiK'n of the day. It stands 
above, and is indciM-iuU-nt of, of all the section- 
alism of svstcnis and schools. 

MONTHLY— I'Mriv-cight pages octavo. 

Singles nuiiilHT. aO'inis: yearly. $3; three 
copies, $5. Aii\ I i:ii>iN( — I'cr whole page, $15; 
half page, $10; i|ii:irl( r ]r.r^r. $t]. 

No objeclioiiubli' ii.l\ c ii ;-inients iuserteii. 
ALEXANDKli MOOliE, Boston, Mass. 



PUBLIC LEDGER. 

PublUked Every Afternoon, Except Sunday, 
By E. WHITMORE, 

At No. 13 Madison Street, Memphis, Tenn. 

The Pnblic Ledger has the Largest Daily 
Circulation of any paper published in the 
State of Tennessee. 

Tlie Job Bepartnient is complete, and is 
the largest establishment of the kind in the 
Southwest. 



PHILADELPHIA ABEIVB POST, 

published every evening, SUNDAYS EX- 
CEPTED, BY 

ASCHMIED & CO., 

No. 46.5 North Third St., below Noble. 

The PbiladelpUia Abend Post— the only 

German evening jjaper in this city— served to 

subscribers at VI cents per week, payable to the 

carriers, or $(> 00 per annum. 

Advertising Rates : 
40 cents per week, per line. 
$1 2fi i)er month, per line. 

(5 00 per year, per line. 



THE TUSCARAWAS CHROiVICLE, 

Uhriciisvii.lk and Dennison, Ohio, 
Halfway from /'ittslnm/ to Columbus, on the Great 

I'an-ILimUe Ruilway. 

PITTINGER & C.V.MIM'.KLL, - PROPRIETORS. 

Advertising Rates ; 



1 sq., 3 months, 
lsq.,6 " 
1 sq., 1 year, 
.'5 sqs., o months, 
3 sqs., G 
3 sqs., 1 year. 



3 00 


.1 00 


8 00 


(i 00 


10 00 


15 00 



1-2 column, 3m., $ 25 00 



6m., 

ly- 

3in., 
6m., 

ly- 



40 00 
60 00 
40 00 
70 00 
100 00 



Advertisements in local column 10 cents 
per line each insertion. 



THE HEBREW. 

San Francisco, California. 



PHILO JACOBY, 
CONRAD JACOBY, 



Publisher. 
Editor. 



One square (10 lines) one Inscjrtion, $1 ; 1 mo., 
$B; 3 mo., $.'>; 1 year, $10. Business cards, not 
Oiceeding 5 lines, $5 per annum. 

(jrKO. P. Rowkll & Co., Agents, Ndw York. 



Publi-shed in German and English. Having a 
circulation in every mining camp, village, and 
town on the Pacific coast, it offers superior ad- 
vantages to a<lvertiscrs. 

THE IVATIOIVAL BAPTIST, 

A First- Class lieligious awd Family Xtwspaper, 

PI'IU.ISIIED WEEKLY BY THE 

American Baptist Publication Society, 

No. .530 Arch Street, Philadelihia. 
Rates of Advertising; — 15 cents per line for 
one insertion; 25 cts. for two; 35 els for three; 
40 I'ts. forfour; 75 cts. for thirteen (3 months); 
$1 2.") for twenty-six ((i monihs): $2 for llfty-two 
insertions (1 vear). 10 per cent . ad lilional for 
cvcrv-other-wcek insertions. Com iiuiously on 
"ith <>V Sth page, 20 per cent, additional. Special 
hiisiness notices, 25 per ciMit. additional. No 
advertisements published as reading matter. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



273 



IXo. 1 Piiljlislied August 28, I860. 

The Weekly Herald. 

PUBLISHED AT GRAND HAVEN, MICHIGAN, WHICH IS THE CENTRE OF THE CELE- 
BRATED PEACH BELT, AND LAKE SHORE FRUIT REGION. 

It makes a specialty of describing the various points suitable for Fruit Growing, and gives 
instruction to beginners. 

EDITEB BT H E IV R T S. C I. U B B . 

THE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT IS CONDUCTED BY 

JACOB GAIVZHORiV, 

An Experienced jVurseryman and Fruit Groover. 



Brief extracts from some of the notices of the Michigan Press in relation to the Grand 
H.WEX Herald : 

" Mr. Clubb has a State reputation as a pub- " The Herald is the name of a new Republican 
aisher, is an excellent reporter, and in his hands ' paper just started at Grand Haven by Henry 
Western Michigan will be well cared for, and , S. Clubb. Mr. C. is an old newspaper man, in- 
Republican principles will have a good advo- ; defatigablv industrious, experienced and al)le, 
cate."— Lansing State Republican. and will make a wide-awake paper. The first 

" Especial attention is devoted to the fruit in- ! ""™'^.f" f *^^:i^jfilf ^^° -j,!,!^" excellent one.'.- 
:terests of that region, which are becoming of I ^«''-«"' Advertiser and Tribune. 
very great importance."— ^Zpena Co. Pioneer. I "The publisher is an old and capable news- 

" The HERALD is the name of a new and de- Paper man, and gives eariyproo^ 
cidedly fine appearing paper, published in this , edge ot his \>nsiness."-Mu^legon Chronicle. 
State. The proprietor and editor is Henry S. ■ " It is a large, well filled and well printed pa- 
Clubb, formerly a reporter on the New York \ per. Mr. Clubb, the editor, is an industrious 
Tribune, and legislative reporter for the Detroit ' man, and will do his best to succeed."— ffrana 
Post."—CassopoUa Democrat. | Haven Union. 

"It isa large, ably edited sheet; contains a , " The Herald is decidedly the best paper ever 
■large amount of original matter, and is, with- pviblished in Ottawa county, and should re- 
out exception, the handsomest sheet in the ! ceive the hearty support of its citizens. In re- 
State, and Michigan has handsomer papers gard to the politics of the Herald we need only 
than any other State in the Union."— Gratiot say that its editor served four years in the 
Journal. LTnion army during the late rebellion."— .a/<. 

" It contains a great deal of interesting infor- Clemens Monitor. 
matioii in regard to the resources of the fruit | " It is under the editoi-ial control of its proprie- 
^rowing region in and about Grand Haven. It I tor, Mr. H. S. Clubb, well known as an able 
.13 a well printed and edited paper and deserves j writer among the journalists of Michigan, and 
a liberal patronage."— /«^7iam Co. News. \ there is no doubt of his s\ic(iGSS."-Wenona Herald, 

" Having been acquainted with Captain Clubb j " Mr. Clubb knocks off a first-class appearing 
formanyyears, we knowthatthe HERALDisand 1 eight-column paper. Republican in politics, 
•will be edited with ability and independence. ' and largely devoted to the agricultural and 
He is a practical man, a forcible writer, of long j horticultviral development of this shore."— 
-experience as a publislier, and we have no 
doubt will make this venture a complete anc- 
cess."— Flint Citiz — 



Manistee Times. 

"It presents a neat and tasteful appearance; 
is Republican in politics, and bids fair to prove 

have received the initial number of the | ^7,f "^l^l^'0"™^*^ *^^"^1'?^1 Y!^!.oVri*i^^''''S!,« 
Haven Hf.rat.d edited nnd nnhiished hv I Ot the Lake Shore Will be heralded."-CTtn<oM 



Grand Haven Herald, edited and published by „ ,,. 

Henry S. Clubb, for many years the able and 1 ^ff"''"*^;?" 

well known conductor ofthe Clarion of that city. 

It is, tj'pographically, a finely executed shee't, 

and its editorials are lively, spicy, fresh— fully 

up to the times. In politics Republican."— Yps'i- 

.lanti Commercial. 



" The Grand Haven Herald was heartily we 



Mr. Clubb is a live newspaper man, a good 
writer, and one ofthe best short-hand reporters 
in the State. It is filled with original matter 
mainly devoted to the fruit and local interests 
of Grand Haven and the Lake Shore country." 
— Grand Rapids Democrat. 

Mr. Clubb understands his business. There 



corned here upon its first issue. Nothing so jg ^q ^gg wishing him success, for he will win 
.good has come 9utofthat city since we can re- jt by industry and attention."— Gfr«nrf Rapids 
member."— Spring Lake Independent. I Eagle 



Terms j One year $2; six months, $1. Always in advance. Extra copies 5 cts. each. 

1 week. 
First 2 lines, .25 

Additional line, .10 

First 10 lines, $1 00 

Additional 10 lines, ..OO 
Local Notices 10 cents per line for the first insertion and 8 cents per line each subsequent in- 
:iertion. Legal advertisements per folio at statute prices. All advertisements from transient 
i^ersone, or strangers, must be paid for in advance. 

18 



Rates of Advertising 








weeks. 3 weeks. 1 month. 


3 months. 


6 months. 


1 year. 


.35 .40 .50 


.75 


$1 00 


$2 00 


.15 .20 .25 


.40 


.70 


1 00 


$1 .50 $2 00 $2 50 


$3 00 


6 00 


10 00 


.75 1 00 1 25 


1 50 


3 00 


5 00 



274 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



HOUSTON (Trl-Weekly) ITISIOJV, 

TRACY & QUICK, Pub'rs, Houston, Texas. 

Circulation second to none in Houston. 

Tekms— S» I'KK Annum in Advance. 

Advertising Kates : 

1-4 coluiiin ;! inos., ■$2(i I l-'2 rolmnn t; inos.. $100 
1-2 •■ :; ■■ 35 I 1 <i 17.5 

1 ■• :j '• 00 I 1-4 •• r.J •■ 100 

1-4 •■ (i •■ (V) I 1-2 ■■ I'i •• 175 

One column twelv.e months, $:100. 



TAVL.OR &, ASPIWWAIil., 

rilKLlSHEli.S OF THE 
FREEPOKT IVEWS, 

FREEPORT. ILL. 

Established 18(>4. Cikculation 5,000. 

AI,BA3fY I.EDGER, 

PUBLISHED P.V J. M. WOOD, 

ALBANY, GENTItV Co., MO. 

A democratic ^V'eekly Paper. 

Terms .- $2 per anmttn, in advance. 

RATES OF ADVERTISING : 

15 cts. per line lirst insertion, each additional in- 
sertion 7 cts. Business notices $8 per year. 
2 squares, 1 year, $12 ; 3 sqrs., $15; 1-4 col., $36; 
1-2 column, $45; 1 column, $75. 
4^ It has a good circulation. 



IIVDIA9IA IIX:RA1.]>, 

HU.NTINGTON, IND. 

Established in July, l.^a.S and lias double tlic 
circulation otany other paper in 

Huntington County. 
.•^unscRii'TioN I'lncE— $2 i-er year. 

.1 d V e r t i s i i» R : 

1 column 1 year, - SSO | 1-4 column 1 year, - $25- 



THl!: EITREKA HERAL1>. 

Published weekly at 

Eureka, Greenwood County, Kansas. 

Circulates in Suiithirestern Kansas. 

FOR ADVEUTISLNG R.VTES ADDRESS 
{«. G. 3IKAI>, Publisher. 



W^HITE t;OlTI«TY RECORD, 



JACOB FROLTCH, Jr., Editor and Pi: 



Circulates c.xc-hisively in live of the Ijcst coun- 
ties that Arkansas can lioast ot. 



THE ST. CROIX COURIER 

Is tlie best advertising medium in West«!rn New 

Brunswick or Eastern Maine. 

Rates of Advertising: 

{Payable in \. Ji. Currency or its ei/uiralent.) 

1 w. 2 w. .{ w. 1 m. 3 m. m. 1 vr. 

1 in. or less $0.75 l.(Ht 1.25 1..50 3.75 5.00 8.00 
2 inches, l.5o -^.ihi 2 5o x.oo .").oo ~.r>o 12.00 

1-4 column. l..M» .'k.'iO c.l'.-. T.iki 1.(110 is. 00 .-^loo 



Address 



.VVll) M.MN, Pnblislier, 



.■JKHl I and 



THE BILL. POSTER. 

Published at Pontiac, Michigan, eveiy Wednes- 
daj' morning, by 

XISBETT & VIALL at the tow price o/$l per year. 

The Bill Poster has a large and rapidly in- 
creasing circulation; is independent in all 
things, and circulates principally among the 
farmers, munulacturers, mechanics and labor- 
ers in OalcUuul and adjoining counties. Kates 
of advertising (which ' are low) furnished on 
application. 

THE PORT HTJROar COMMERCIAL. 

Published every Wednesday morning at 
Port Huron, Michigan. 

Has a large and constantly increasing circula- 
tion in the City of Port Huron, and the 
counties of .st. Clair, Sanilac 
and Macond). 
Its advantages as an advertising medium are 
exc(^llent, it having a larger circulation than 
any of its local contempowiries. Subscription 
price $2 per year. For rates of advertising ap- 
ply to 

TALBOT & SON, Port Huron, Mich. 

PIERCE COliXTY HERALn. 

PuHLisiiED Every Tiiur.sdav Morning, by 

Morris 15. Ki.mhall. Proprietor, 

Ellswortli, . . - , . ^Viscousiu, 

Located in one of the finest and most 
pr<>s|)er(>us agricultural regions in Northwesl- 
crn Wisconsin. The Hkrai.o oilers excellent 
indneements to advertisers. Its cinnlation is 
above the a\ frage of " count i\ newspapers,'' 
a i.ivi; i.()< .\i, .loruNAi. the nund)er 



of its readers is constantly- increasing. Ailver- 



Mcphen, N. 15., or Calais, Me. tisetnents 



d Mt reaso 



GRA.\I> TR.IVEIISI': IIJOKALl). 

Persons who wish to learn all al)ont the <'ele- 
brated Grand Traverse; region, where there is 
no fever and ague, and where peaches arc grown 
every year, should scsnd for the above named 
paper." Ti-rms: $2 a year. Kates of advertising: 
1 sifr. (H lines), first insertion, $1 ; each subse- 
quent inserthm, 30 cts. Yearly advert iscinents : 
$10 for 1 s<ir. ; $10 for 2 s(jrs. ; $20 for ,! sqrs. ; $-15 
for half col.; $75 for 1 col. Address 

D. ('. LEACH, Editor and Proprietor, 
Traverse CMty, .Mich. 
October 1, hSilO. 



THE MAAISTEE TIMIOS 

Is tlic ollicial i)apcr of the city and 
and is now the largest papi'r and I 



.M;inistcc has nearly 5.(i(i(i inliabitants, is in the 
very centre of the ee"leliiiiled Unit belt ol Mich- 
igan, and is surrounded by the best fruit, agri- 
cultural and lumbering country oi the North- 
west ; and the TiMi.s is the only"i)aper that can 
givi; accurate intormalion as to 1 his region. 
Only $2 per year in advance. 

.s. \S , K()\Vl.i;i{. Kditorand Piil.'r. 
.Manistee, Jlichigaii. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 275 



TO AI>VERTISERS. 



The Omaha Republican. 



BAII.Y, TRI->^^EEKt,Y A]VI> ^'EEKIiT. 



ENLARGED AND IMPROVED. 



Tlie construction of the Union Pacific Raili-oad from Omaha to the Pacific Ocean has inaugu- 
rated an extraordinary contest for the immense trade of the great Mineral and Agricultural 
countiy lying between the Missouri River and the Pacific Ocean. Judicious advertising will 
have a vast influence in determining the direction of it. I beg leave to present the following 
reasons why it will be to the advantage of all classes of business men to 



ADVERTISE IN THE COliITMIVS OF THE OMAHA REPlTBr,ICAJV. 

I.— It is now in the twelfth year of its existence, the oldest established paper published in the 
State of Nebraska, and in consideration of its standing and prominence as a first-class Metro- 
politan newspaper for said State, it has been chosen as 

The Official Paper of Omalia City , 

Tlie Official Paper of the Coiiuty of Douglas, 

The Official Paper of the State of Nebraska, 

The Official Paper of the United States, 

For the Publication of the Laws, and the Official Advertisements of the War, State, Interior and 
Post Office Departments of the Federal Government. 

II.— It has a circulation in eveiy county in the State, and a large circulation outside. 

III.— Its circulation is confessedly larger than that of any other paper published in Nebraska. 

IV.— Intelligent advertisers will take into account the fact that the Omaha Republican is the 
.State Organ of the Republican Party, which is largely in the majority in this State. 

v.— It is pnbli.shed in tlie commercial Metropolis of the State of Nebraska and of the North- 
west, west of Chicago and north of St. Louis, the Initial Point of the ^eat ITniou Pacific 
Railroad, the Eastern outlet of the vast Western trade. 

On November .3d, 18IJ8, the vote cast for President in Omaha City was :t,053, which, multi- 
plied by six, shows a population of lH,iil'i. 



This statement of fact will convince everybody of the value of the Republican as an advcr- 
tL'?ing medium in this new field of operations, in the Missouri Valley and the Mineral districts ol 
the West, and it therefore respectfully solicits advertising patronage. 



ST. A. D. BAtiCOMBE, 

Republican Building, 

Omaha, Nebraska. 



276 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

THE POPUXiAB PAPER OF THE XOBTH-WEST ! 

The Western Soldier's Friend 

AJSl* FIRESIDE COMP.1JVIOX. 

C. AUGUSTUS HAVIEi:VI>,^ Editors. ^Illrs. C. AUGUSTUS HATIEAJST>, 

Published nt :Yo. 8 Custom House Place, Clilcago, Illinois. 

18TO. FOURTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 1870. 

TUe Only Coiubiued Literary aud Soldier's Paper in tUe A^ortli-West. 

IT REACHES NEARLY EVERY WESTERN POST-OFFICE. 



Terms of Advertising : 

Special Notices 50 cents per line, Nonpareil leatle<l. Notices in other advertising columns, $2 
per square (of 8 lines Agate) first insertion ; each subsequent insertion, $1 50. Advance payment. 

TERilS OF SUBSCRIPTIOX : $2 PER Y'EAK, IX ADVANCE. 

Address all orders, HAVIEA:vi> «fc CO., 

Publishers ^'estern Soldier's Friend, 

Chicago, Illinois. 



THE OFFICIAIi PAPER OF THE CITT. 

A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER. 

Weekly Madison Free Press, 

JOHX ». SI.lIPSO:V & CO., Publishers and Proprietors. 
OFFICE AT ISO. Ift EAST MAIIV CROSS STREET, MADISO^T, I^VDIA^TA. 

SPECIAL, ]V O T I C E . 

The Free Press is a handsomely pi-inted forty-column quarto newspaper; the official paper 
of the city, and the organ of the Democratic party in the Third Congressional District, besides 
commanding the support of its party in Indiana; has a circulation in Trimble, Owen, Shelby, 
Carroll and Henry counties, Kentucky, unattainable by any cotemporary. 

N. B.— Advertising rates liberal. 



Advertising Rates : 

2 m. ,3 m. C, m. 1 yr. I 1 w. 2 w. 1 m. 2 m. .3 m. G m. 1 yr- 

$1 .-iO $2 .50 $.3 .-iO $5 00 $8 00 .-J inches, $2 75 $4 25 ^ii 25 $!) .50 $13 00 $21 00 $:t2 00 
"'■" 4 00 5 00 8 00 12 00 I 1-4 col'n, 3 00 5 00 7 00 1100 15 00 24 00 35 00 
5 00 7 00 10 00 17 00 1-2 col'n, 5 00 7.50 12 00 18 00 25 00 35 00 CO 00 
0.50 9 00 1100 22 0() 3-4 col'n, 7 00 10 (K) 15 00 25 00 30 00 IS 00 8(i 00 
8 00 1100 18 00 27 00 I 1 column, 1)00 12 00 18 00 30 00 .'V) 00 00 00 UX) 00 
Special TVotices, twenty-flvo per cent. ad<litional to above rates. 
City Items ten cents p<-r lino, cacli insiTlioii. 

Marriage, Dcalli iin<l FiiiiiTal Notices ircr. obituary Notices, fifty cents per square. 
Legal, Occasional and Foreign Advertisements mu.st be paid for in advance, or payment 
secured in a satislactory niuiiner to tin; PiililiBliers. 

All letters, whether for publication or on business, must bo addressed to 

J. I>. SI.>IPSO]V &. CO., Publishers of Free Press, 

Mudisoii, Indiana. 

References « 

Hon. Tuo.^. A, IlENDniCK.S,U. S. Senate; iron. H. W. IIaukinotox, Ex. M. C. 3d Cong'l District; 





1 w. 


2 w. 


1 m. 


1-2 inch. 


.50 


$100 


$1 .50 


1 inch, 


.75 


125 


2 00 


2 inches, 


1 25 


2 00 


3 .50 


3 Inches, 


1 75 


2 75 


4.50 


4 inches. 


2 25 


3 50 


5.50 



Hon. Wm. E. Holeman, M. C. 3d Cong'l District. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 277 



The Georgia Farm Journal. 

THE SOTTTHKRiV FARMER'S ACiRICT I^TFRAL AiVD I.ITERARY tOMPAlVIOiV. 

AX ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 
Of eight page.s-foity columns, devoted to the interest of the Farmer and his Household. 

ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY. 

J. F. SHECFT, Publisher, ATI.AIVTA, GEORGIA. 

Subscription Rates : 

One Copy, One Tear, - «3 GO 

Four Copies, One Year, - ID OO 

Ten Copies, One Year, . - 20 OO 

A Compendium of all that is choice in 
AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, FLORICUI.TURE, MECHANISM, STOCK AND DAIRY 

HUSBANDRY, 

THE ARTS AWD SCIEIVCES, 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY', POULTRY YARD, POESY AND ROMANCE, WIT AND HUMOR, 

EDUCATION, LITERATURE. 

And a Concise Gleaning of all tbe 

LATEST IMPORTANT WE^VS OF THE BAY. 



.^^ Tl^* "^*' Talent in the Sputh will be employed in every department of the paper, and we 
tutSel^hTnoneT^J'itit^:'' "^ """^"^^ '''' '^"^'"-^"^ ^ First-class A^icultu^rii WeeUi;.: 

ers of ttfe^State ^ '^ second to no paper in Georgia as an advertising medium among the Farm- 



A«lvertising Rates : 

Per square of one inch, first insertion, - - . . . ^-, rn 

Bach subsequent insertion, under 3 months, - - . . . . *^ ^^ 



-. . , '^ niOS. G mos. 1 w. I •{ nio^ <i mnu 1 i-v 

H ^^l- ^ H i"«lies, $5.5 $.W $75 1 column, 17 inches, il5 *UW swl 

50 75 100 I Special Notices !H) pei 

Local Notices 25 cents a line each insertion. 



it " ' t no "'f "«^^' * *•'' $''0 $75 1 column, 17 inches, $75 $loo $1.50 

^''' ''^"'- T '^ 1 XT ^•''''- - 100 I Special Notices .'W per cent, additional. 



samp''^®r,'^^T'^J'f'^^ °'' °'°"*^^^' "' '"^'■''"''®- P=iPer.ssent advertisers during continuance of 
same. Send 10 cents lor specimen copy. 



278 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BDOK. 



The Fulton Times. 

WKKKLY. 
FUI.T01V, O.S\Vi:«0 tOUl\TV, XVAX YOKH. 

LARliP: AND RAPIDLY INCUEASING CIKCULATION FN THE COUNTV. 

•' IndepiMuloiit in everything; handsomely gotten up, and sharply alivi?." 

" Its news items are crisp and fresh : its miscellany hiprh-toiied and ^ aried. and its Edilorial.- 
unexceptionable l)oth as to style and substance.'' 

Advertising Rates : 

One week, per line, - ■ - 5 cents. 1 Three months, per line. • ■ ."JO cents 

" month, '• ... 15 " I Six months, " - - 50 " 

Twelve montlis, per line, 85 cents. 
Reading matter, leaded, 8 cents per line each in.scrtion. Address 

«EO. E. WII.r,IA!»IS, Fulton, SJ. X. 



A LIVE EDITOR, TOPICS OF VITAL INTEREST, AND A PLUCKY SPIRIT. SHOULD CARRY 

The Schoolmaster 

INTO EVERY SCHOOr, DISTRICT IIV THE riVITEI> STATES. 
Official Paper to tite Illinois IVornial University and Illinoi.s IVomial Alumni Association. 

ADVERTISING R.^TES : TEN CENTS A LINE, E.VCH INSERTION. 

JOIirV IlVl.'L., Pu1>lislier, I{loomin$;ton, Illinois. 



The Philadelphia Underwriter. 

AIV IIV1>EPEj\1>E]VT MONTHLY JOIRNAi. (24 PAGES.) 

DEVOTED TO INSLTIANCE, RAILRO.\DS, AND JOINT STOCK CORPORATIONS. 

Unexcelled, and perltaps IJnequaled, 

In the extent of it.s circulation, throuf^diout all the States of this country. 

TERMS, STRKTI^Y' CASH. 

SUBSCRIPTION: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUAL SINGLE COPIES 25 CENTS. 

Rates of Advertising : 



WTiole Page, per annum. ■ - - $400 

Half Page, '• - - - - 225 

Whole column, '• - - - 1,50 

Half " » .... HO 

Quarter " •■ ... 50 

Advertisements due when ordered; and inserted only fertile time paid lor 

Office, 019 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 



Card (12 lines,) per annum, - $.30 

Page, double column, per annum - 300 

1-2 Pago, double column, per annum. - 175 

1-4 " •' " '• - - 100 

4 " three columjis, - • 150 



The San Augustine Beacon. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT .SAN .VUGU.STINE. TEXAS, 

BY J. T. & \V. I\ McCLAIVAHAIV. 

The Beacon is the ofllcial organ of live of the cotton-growing counties of Eastern Texas, and 

circulates as follows: Panola county takes 1S5; .shelhv county, 4.!(i; .Sabine, 240; ,San 

Augustine, .W); Nacogdoches, 200, and Angelina, 140. Total" .Subscription. 1,.5()0. 

Rates of Advertlsiiii; : 





1 in( 


h. 


2 inch.'H. 


:!in 


dies. 


■1 coluniM 


!■; .■nlnniii. 


1-2 column. 


1 column. 


1 month. 


$.•> 




#- 




$12 


$20 


*2.". 


$:iO 


$.50 


2 


8 




12 




1.-) 


:>o 




to 


75 


:i 


12 




1.) 




20 


11) 


45 


.50 


100 


t; 


15 




20 




25 


00 


75 


iH) 


150 


1 year. 


20 




:«) 




40 


75 


100 




200 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Richmond $c Louisville MedicalJournal. 



THE r.AUGKST MKDICAL MONTHLY IN AMEEICA. 



Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine in the Louisville Medical College: late 

Professor of General Pathology and Pathological Anutoiny in tlie Kentucky School 

of Medicine; late Professor of General Pathology ami Pathological Anatomy 

in the Medical College of Va.; late Professor "oi Physiology and Pathol- 

og>- in the Cumberland University of Nashville, Tennessee, 

Editor and Propi*ietor. 



ASSOCIATE KOITORS ! 



Professor G. S. Bedfokd, New York. 

" J. L. Cabell, University of Virginia. 

S. E. Chaille, New Orleans. 
" S. C. Chew, Baltimore, Maryland. 

J. S. Chisolm, Baltimore, M"aryJand. 

S. H. Dickson, Philadelphia. 

Paul F. Eve, St. Louis. Mo. 



Professor F. H. Hamilton. New York. 



Professor J. M. Holloway, Louisville, Ky. 
L. S. JoYNES, Richmond, Va. 
Z. Pitcher, Detroit, Michigan. 
Lewis A. Sayre, New York. 
Alfkei> Stille, Philadelphia. 
T. (iAiLLARD Thomas, New York. 
W. H. Van Biren, New York. 



This Journal was established in Richmond, Va.. January, IStiti, and has now reached its ninth 
volume. It was removed to Louisville, Kentucky, by the invitation of the Kentucky State Med- 
ical Society, May, 1868. 

It is the only Medical Journal in this State. Its circulation has been doubled during the past 
year, and is now constantly increasing; the present circulation is 1,250; of this number, over 300 
copies are sent to Kentucky physicians every month, and over 500 copies to physicians imme- 
diately south of Kentucky ; 400 copies are sent to Northern physicians. 

As an advertising medium it oflfers the best advantages, not only to those who deal in Med- 
ical Supplies, Instruments, etc., but to all that desire to obtain the direct patronage and sup- 
port of over 1,250 citizens, who, in common with all men, need the miscellaneous articles re- 
quired in daily life. In Europe, Mercantile and Commercial Houses have learned this valuable 
fact, and they advertise in Leading Medical Journals just as promptly, and as extensively as 
they do in the daily papers. 



TERMS— .SUBSCRIPTION: $.") 00 YEARLY IN ADVANCE. 



Advertising^ Katrs : 

One page 12 months. .--..-.... ^50 00 

(i ■■ ----...... ;J0 00 

'■■■:'.■ 24 00 

■• •• 1 ■• .......... 10 00 

Business Cards, 12 months, eighth page, ....... .-, oo 

Leo space and time charged in iiroportion. 



Advertising bills payab 
J'or other particulars, apply to 



*. CJAILLAUn, M. !>., Editor and Proprietor, 

a© >Vest Jefferson Street, Louisville, Heutuckx* 



AMERICAN NEWSPArER RATE-BOOK. 



The Middleborough Gazette 

Has been established sevpntccii xeais, and is publislicd in fho local interests of Plymouth' 
county. As a Medinni for Advertising' it is not surpassed by any pajx-r in tlic county, 
reaehiuf^tlie inhabitants o;' eve rv town of the southeast jnuM ion of it. lu the nourishing nianufac- 
tiirinf,'to\vnsof .Middh'liorouirh, \\'arehan\, ri\inoutli, I'lxiniiton, Freetown, and Ihi- Kridtrewaters, 
it has a list of subscriliers well worthv the attention of advertisers. Advertising; UnteM — 1 sqr.,- 
1-2 lines this type. 1 time, $1 ; each sub.seciuent insertion, i"! ets ; 1 eol.. 1 insertion, $l(i; 1-2 col., 1 
insertion, $G;'l sqr., 3 mos., $3; (i mos., $5; 12 mos., $9; 2 sqrs.. .'. mo- , .t^."): mos., $!): 12 mo3., $U; 
1-4 col.. 3 mos., $10 ;« mos.. $15; 12 mo.s., $U; 1-2 col., 3 mos , $.'ii: r, mos, $3.5; 12 mos., S'iO: 1 col., 3 
mos., $40; 6 mos., $'J0; 12 mos., $100. JAMES M. <'0<).MIIS, Middleborough, Mass. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co., New York, Agents. Special Notices, lu per cent, advance on above. 

The Wlaroa Weekly Tribune. 

Lively, spicy, readable: independent in everythin;^: only paper printed in the place: adver- 
tisements taken at living rates. Published every .Satni-day, by 

A. H. <'on.MA:V, Editor and Proprietor. 

Maroa, Macon County, 111., is situated on the 1. C. li. \i.. 12 1-2 miles north of Decatur, the 
county seat : is surrounded bv some of the best farmini,' land in the world : is one of the best— if 
not i/iVics'/— grain-shipping point on the Illinois Central: lias a ilriving, thriving population of 
1,100; has plenty of water and (the State (ieologist says) coal bn- the digging: has a fnie ])ublic- 
school, four churches, and good soeift>-, but no licensed drinking saloon. In short, Maroa has- 
advantages olTared by few other inland towns for permanent residcnn^ and prosperous business. 

SEPTEMBEK, 18(J9. 

The Courier. 

A riR.ST-CLASS .SEVEN-COLUMN PAPER, ITI'.LISIIKI) EVERY SATURDAY, AT 

Baton Rocge, Louisiana. 

Circulates in all parts of Louisiana. Official Journal of East Baton Rouge, and an 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE STATE. 

Terms : $a a year. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE COPIES CONTAINING ADVERTISING RATES. 

The Traveler's Journal. 

HARTFOKI*, COA'JV. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY, WITH A FREE DAILY CIRCULATION ON THE PASSENGER TRAINS, 

STEAMBOATS, HOTELS AND STREETS. 

It is also Mailed Weekly to the Hotels in Haktfokd County. 

Kates of Advertising : 

One inch, one insertion, - - $1 2.") | p:aeh continuance, . - - . T.') cents. 

It is one of the best advertising mediums in the .state. 

JOSEIMI II. KAKAFM &, CO., Proprietors. 



The Marion Flag. 



PUBLISHED WEEKUV AT MARION. W1LLIAM>()N COUNTY. ILLINOIS. 
i:.YMA]V E. MIV.VPP, Editor and Pioprictor. 

THE ONLY PAI'ER EVER FIKMLV Ks rAl'.LlSHED IN THE COUNTY. 
It is the organ of the Republican i)art v and < )l1i -ial Paper of the County. Has a .eood circu- 
lation, and is a valuable medium for Advertisers. 
Advertising Hates: 

One column, one year, $;<• I Eighth column, one year, .... $10 

Half column, one year, - - . - :!o ()rdinary Business Cards, .... 6 

Quarter column, one year, - !.'> | 

The Morris Chronicle 

IS ITHI.ISIIKI) KVKKV WKDNKSDAV. AT 
.MOHKI.S, ,\«\v Vork, by I>. I*. f.V IIIMO.XTICIt. IMitor. 

Terms-*! 2.-> a vearin advanc': C..". cents t(n' si.v months: :!.'■> cents for three months. 

The CHKONICLE will give special attention to Local Niavs. and matters which mos' interest the 

public. In laet. it will be the aim of its Editor to nnd<e it the 

BEST I,o( AE NE\VSI'.\PEK PUIU.ISIIED IN TME COUNTY. 

In connection with the jiaper we have a good a.ssortnmnt of .Ion Tvn;, and all description of 

Job Printino e.\-ecut<'d with neatness an<l despatch. Subscriptions Advertising and .Job Work,- 

soliclted. All orders will receive prompt attention. Adilress, 

L. P. t AUPEXTEH, Morris, W. T. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 281 



The American Freemason 

IS PUT AT THE liOTV PRICE OF ONE DOIiLAR A YEAR, 

Kot because it is believed to be worth no more, but to the end that every Freemason in America 
may feel that he can afford to take a copy of it. 



It Is devoted to the vindication of the rights of Freemasons in their lodges— rights which, to 
admit of our present style of American grand lodges, are violated, until they are, in great 
measure, at present unknown. In its vindication of these rights the American Freemason 
shall advocate such reforms as, if adoptiMl, will inakc the Freemasonry of America a model for 
that of the whole world. Among these iit'oniis will he the following: 

1. The complete recognition of Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity among the brethren, Free- 
masons of every rank, country, race, and color, in "their lodges. 

2. The total rejection of those ideas of caste, creed, race, and color which at present are 
recognized and made i)rc-rc(iuisites to initiation and affiliation. 

3. Freedom for brethren Freemasons to select such rite as they may elect, by which to per- 
form their work, provided the same embodies the usual obligations and modes of recognition. 

4. Freedom to obtain a charter to organize a lodge from any authority competent to grant 
the same, provided that the authority set up by the lodges of that particula"r jurisdiction refuses 
to grant such charter. 

5. Freedom for any stated number of operative lodges, not less than three, in any of the 
United States, to organize a grand lodge, mainly recognizing in such organization and consti- 
tution the rights and convenience of the brethren. 

6. Freedom for every grand lodge so organized to enjoy like privileges and powers with 
every other grand lodge extant in America, or elsewhere. 

7. All business transacted at the annual sessions of our present grand lodges, except election 
of officers, to be divided among and intrusted to the grand officers elect: and the reports of such 
officers, fully and clearly written, and with the necessary apjx'iulcnt resolutions for the consid- 
eration of the grand lodge, should be submitted at the annual Kraiid lodge or general assembly 
for final action. A grand lodge being nothing but a general assciubly of the brethren of any 
given gi-and lodge jurisdiction, its biisiness should be confined to the reception of the reports of 
its gi-and officers, the adoption, rejection, or amendment and final passage, of the appendent 
resolutions, and the election of officers for the ensuing year. 

8. Freedom to resist all levy or tax of any kind or for any purjiose, unless the proposition to 
pay the same may be adopted by a clear majority of the brethren in general assembly, after 
full and fi-ee discussion. 

9. Freedom for all brethren entitled to represent their respective lodges in their respective 
grand lodge to do so, particularly Lodge Past Masters, and Masters and Wardens elect, en masse^ 
or as they may individually elect to attend; provided that, in the event of the full attendance 
of such from each lod^re in the jurisdiction not being present, those present shall have and ex- 
ercise the right to poll the full vote of their respective lodges. 

10. Total ireedoni at all times, and under all circumstances, from any tax or levj' assessed to 
pay mileage or per diem to any representative or officer of a grand lodge; but, instead, freedom 
at all times to make liberal provision to pay grand officers for the performance of the duties 
assigned them, as the executive of that body. 

11. Freedom to resist all attempts to centralize power bv at all times resisting every propo- 
sition which may be made to erect costly buildings for "a stationary grand lodge; biit, on the 
contrai-y, 

12. Freedom to aid in every proper manner the brethren evei-s^where in the erection of suit- 
able meeting houses, at moderate prices, for the use of operative lodges in cities and other local- 
ities where one or more of such lodges may exist, to the end that the brethren may have their 
own places of business in which to perform their rites and ceremonies in a satisfactoiy and un- 
interruptible manner. 

13. Freedom for individual brethren of any Masonic rite to visit lodges of any rite working 
the degrees coriesijoudiiii; to those wliich they have taken: and this irrespective of creed, race, 
or color, but uixm the broad priuciide of Universal Fraternity. 

14. Freedom lor operative lodges of any rite to receive as visitors brethren of any rite, creed, 
race, or color, provided the same can prove, bv the usual tests upon examination, that they have 
been accepted and properly initiated into the Fraternity. 



The foregoing, and such other needful refoi-ms as may be considered necessaiy, will find in 
the AiiERiCAX Freemason an intrepid and intelligent advocate ; and all who feel that such re- 
forms are required for the present Freemasonrj^ of America, by subscribing for this paper, and 
inducing the brethren in their respective localities to do the like, will contribute in an effective 
manner to their eventual adoption. 

.8S=- Brethren who shall obtain ten or more subscribers each will be allowed a commission 
of 25 per cent, on the regular rate of One Dollar each which they maj^ receive for the same. This 
commission will not, however, be allowed on a less nunil)er tlia"n ten. 

flS" All subscriptions commence with the March and end with the following Febmaiy num- 
bers of the twelve months within which the subscription is received. 

4®" All remittances exceeding a single subscription should be made, if possible, by Postal 
Money Order, or, if not, in registered letters. In no other manner can money be remitted se- 
curely by mail. Address all correspondence and subscriptions to 

J. FLETCHER BREIVIVAJV, 114 Main St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



J^=- The circulation of the American Freemason at present is sufficient to justify its patron- 
age by the advertising community. As its pages are stereotji^ecf, permanent advertising is pre- 
feiTed, and to secure which very favorable terms will, on application, be offered. 



-282 AMERICAN NEWSrAPKi: RATE-BOOK. 



IVIt. Sterling, III., Weekly Gazette. 

PI'BI.ISIIKIt 18V .lAMKS S. II.IMR At <i:ll. 



This i8 :i lary;o niiu'-colmmi Journal, the only one published in Brown County. Illinois, 

.\M> HAS I HE 

T..arjje.st. rirciUatioii of any Ccmiitrj- iVe^vspaper 

IX THE IVKST. 



j^- CIRCULATES TIIROrGII TilK RICHEST LOCALITIES OF THE GREAT GARDEN STATE 

nrsfXKSs mi:n will kind it an 
EXCEI.r,EXT ADVERTISING MEI>irM:. 

CIRCTDATIOIV rOlTRTEEX HrJVDRED. 

The Southern Democrat. 

1»IIBI.ISIIEI> WKEKI^Y, 

A r 

T II O .n I> K O X , U 10 4> R O I A . 

L.VRGER ( IT?( ILATION THAN ANY OTJIEU COUNTRY TAPER I'UHLISUKD IN THE .STATK. 



Aoyi:nrisi:MEXTs ixsi:nri:i> o.y rEin ninr.nAi. TEu.srs. 

i.i. J. I''ORI>, I'ruprU'tur, ThompMoii, 4>forKlM. 

lino. F. RoNVKi.L \ Co., No. W I'luk Row, New York, luithorbscd Ail verti.-iing Agent h. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



[KSTAIiMSIIIK LSliC] 



Rural Gentleman tc Ladies' Companion 



A SEMI-}»IO]\THi:.\' JOUBIVAl, FOB COriVTRY A1V» TOWl¥. 



INDEPENDENT I FE A KI.ESS ! HIGH-TONED ! 



TKRMS, SI A YEAR IW AOVAIVCE. 

•25 copies, to one address. -.-.... ^.20 00 

50 '= " '• - - - - - - ;55 00 

75 " '• " - - - - - - - .50 00 

100 •' '• " - - - - . a5 00 

Here now is an excellent chance for Horticultural, Farmers', and all other Clubs to supply 
themselves with good reading at very cheap rates. 



CASH ABVERTISIIVG RATES. 

Transient Matter, 15 cents per line (eight words) Nonpareil space, first insertion, and 10 
«euts each subsequent insertion. 

"Business Announcements," immediately following reading matter, 25 cents per line 
first insertion, and 20 cents each insertion thereafter. 

Cuts $1 per line for space occupied by each insertion. 

3 mos. () mos. 1'2 mos. 

■Quarter column. - - $15 00 $-25 00 $40 00 

Half " - . - - '25 00 40 00 tiO 00 

Whole ■' - - - - - 40 00 (iO 00 100 00 



fl®- Active Canvassers Wanted Everywhere, and inducements ottered to make it pay 
those who will -tvorfe. 



Specimens furnished on receipt of two postage stamp'*. 



J. K. ROiSI.\NOil[, 

1'. O. Box 1.0!?.S. Kaltimore, Md. 



fl®- Magazines or Newspapers inserting till.-, mlvertisement one month (with editorial notice) 
<3an have their card inserted to amount of bill in The Ruisal Gentleman. 



284 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

The Jacksonville Independent. 

A FIUST-CI.ASS W KKKI.V FAMILY NKW^l'AI'KlJ. 

l>evote<l to Aews. Home I.ittrature. Kducatlon mid tieiieral Iutellii(<'iire. 

IM>KPK.\»i:XT O.-V ALL SlBJIit TS. 

Has a large and rapidly increasing circulation, and is one of the best advertising mediums ii» 
Central Illinois. 'Having an able corps of literary writers, and circulating among the 
better class of people, the Independent presents unusual advantages to 
first-class advertisers. Advertisements are arranged in ap- 
propriate and attractive forms at the following 
AI>VERTISI]V« KATES : 
One card, one inch, per year, - - - ^l.") 00 I One column, 24 inches, per year, - - $100 CO 
Quarter column, six inches, per year, - ,50 00 Reading matter, leaded, per line, - - 20 

Half column, twelve inches, per year, - 7.5 00 | Special Hates learned by addressing 

IRO]V>IO:^'Ci£R &, FFIVK. Jacksonville, IlUnols. 



The Marion Chronicle. 

A LARGE MNE-CULUMN PAl'KK, - - - - KEI'LBLICAN IN POLITICS. 

Publislied at Marion, Indiana. 

THE ONLY PAPER PRINTED IN THE COUNTV OF (JRANT, ONE OF THE LARGEST AND 
MO.ST WEALTHY IN THE .'^TATE. 

The Chronicle is one of the leading papers of the Eighth Congressional District. Especial care 

given to its advertising columns. Its merits as an advertising medium are attested by 

the fact that its columns are almost exclusively filled with home advertisements. 

RATES OF AW^TERTISIXG : 



linch, - - 
2 inches, - 
1-4 column 


1 w. 

$1 00 
2 00 
4 00 


im. 

$2 00 
3 00 
7 00 


3 mos. 
$3 00 
5 00 
10 00 


(! mos. 
$5 00 
8 00 
15 00 


1 vear. 

■$8 00 
12 00 
25 00 


1-2 column, 
3-4 column, 
1 column, 


1 w. 

$(> 00 
8 00 
10 00 


1 ni. 

$10 00 

15 00 

20 00 


3 mo. 

$16 00 
25 00 
32 00 


mo. 

$28 00 
3(i 00 
4.5 00 


1 vear. 

$45 «> 
(iO 00 
80 00 


Copies 
Agency, N 


furnished on 
ew York. 


application, and file can be seen at Geo. P. Rowell & Co.'s Advertising 
MARSHAT,!. F. Ti:ir<):i.EY, Editor and Proprietor. 



0:V^VAR» ! rP^VARD ! I 

Having met with success, far bevoxd our expectation, in the publication of the 

Charlotte Observer, 

We take this method of otrcriiiK our piiper.s, I>aily, Tri-Weekly and "IVeekly, as among the 
best advertising mediums in Western N. C. Advertisements solicited. Terms moderate. 

Advertising Rates in Daily and Tri-"»Veekly " Charlotte Ohserver :" 



1 day. 1 wk. 1 mo. 3 mo. 6 mo. 1 yr. 

1 square, .75 $3 00 $7 50 $17 00 $20 $25 

2 " $150 COO 10 00 25 00 30 40 

3 " 1 75 7 .50 Hi 00 30 Of) 38 .55 

4 " 2 25 8.50 20 (X) :{.5 00 45 75 



1 day. 1 wk. 1 mo. 3 mo. G mo. 1 yr. 

1-4 col., $2 75 $9,50 $25 00 $40 00 $48 $80 

1-2 col., 5,50 1().50 30 00 .55 00 75 140 

1 col., 10 00 28 00 45 00 i»0 00 175 300- 

Oiii' inch sixice (or less) makes a square. 



Advertisements inserted in Weekly, $1 per square for first insertion; 75 cts. each subsequent 
insertion. Notices published in LocarcoUimn 10 cents jicr line for each insertion. Notices pub- 
lished under head of" Special Notices " will be charged 5 cents per line for each insertion. 
Address all letters to 

SMITH, >VATSOX «fc CO., <' Cliarlotte Observer," Charlotte, 1¥. C. 
_ ■ -* 

The Home Monthly. 

A Successful Southern Ma$;azine. 

THE 1>!TEI{A1{Y OlKiAN OF THE SOUTHEIiN METHODIST CHURCH. 
It circulate* larj^ely in every Southern State, and its circulation is steadily increasing. 

It offers peculiar advantages to advertisers who wish to reach the wealthier and more 
intelligent classes in the South. 

RATES OF Al»VERTISi;V«ii : 

1 page, 1 mo., $15 00; (i mo., $<J0 00; 1 vear. $1(MI (HI I l-t page, 1 mo., $5 00; (1 mo., $20 00; 1 year, $:« 00 

l-'i " I mo., 8 00; (i mo., 35 (K); 1 yciir. (i) (Hi | 1-8 page, I mo., 3 00; (i mo., 12 00; 1 year, 20 00 

First page of ailvertising sheet and llie cover-pages at higher rates by special contract. 

Si isscuiiTioN Puke: $3 Pei; Annum. 

jkddresa A. It. ST.VRK, Soutlicrn .Methodist Pul>Ushiiij{ House. 

IVashvllle, T«nn«s««e. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Southern Review. 



A. T. BliKDSOE, lili. D., EdUov. 

(LATE PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.) 

REV. E. J. STEARIVS, A. M., Associate Editor. 

(FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF MODERN LANGUAGES IN ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, ANNAPOLIS.) 



THE REVIETV 

Is Published in Raltimoi-e, on the fli-st day of January, April, July and October, 

AT FIVE DOLL Alls PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. 
If not paid within three months, Six Dollars. 



RATES OF ADVERTISIIVG : 

Twenty-five Dollars per page, - . _ - for each insertion, 

AND AT THE SAME RATE FOR A HALF OR A QUARTER OF A PAGE. 

All coiTespondence should be addressed to 

REV. E. J. STEARIVS, 
Southern Review Office, Baltimore, Md. 



may^beSn wuTanTnSer'!''*^' ""^""P* *^°'' '^' ^P"^' '^"'^ ^"'^ *^°*°1^^^-' ^^^^ Subscriptions 
seen fif thllfoliow^inl^''"* completed its Third Year. The estimation in which it is held may be 

OPIIVIOIVS OF THE PRESS. 

tlon oMt9^cKs?''whi?h^wU,;,?°£'''' t' ^"^ ri' J"^^"*' ^^"""^ the first number, is the ablest publica- 
cSn^imiJ-Bkmm^^'Ga^ll ^"'^ "^"^-l^'l^^' ^^'^^ '^^^^ challenged the attention of thj Ameri- 
SoutWnd''In ^U^^L^d?'i'-\^^'^'' REVIEW, which is destined to enjoy a wide popularity in the 
ror%UimorI!: "^'^^'^^'l*^'^ literary lame throughout the English reading world. "-Caifti/ic Mir- 
" The SOUTHERN REVIEW increases its claims upon our regard and admiration with the i<s<5iiP 
fr^Z^KaH^tJn C^He"'''"^"'' '^^ ''"'^ ^'^''^ now^before Js^^ iu^^erJ^esSct^In ^^ 
^»„'i A^® "^^5,*^ prepared for cleverness, vivacity, intensity, elegant scholarshin— but not for the 
rxSVaro;^!^ir.^'^^<f»?rS/'i?^f„ST./"^^^ eudeavo^'to indicate du^^[;lrthrcVu?L^°o^f ^ 

ener^^ wMch'dfftTTiSf.T tbT/S"''-^T' ^f ?' ^^ ^ <^^Pital ^^ew Year's number. The power and 
can rl^i^ws '^-rt' ,sSu laZ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^°"^ ^^° P'^«^^ " ^"^ the front rank of Amerl- 

ical'knd crifi^nf rpti'iw'^'^fl?! fi sustaining well the position it immediately assumed as a polit- 

- wp iarnpit w V«„ "'''A'?* quality ."-Episcopal Methodist, Baltimore. ^ 

andcSdTeSg^^iT.?^^^^^^^^^^^^^ to give this publication 



^i^ '^'^^^S^^S^^fT^^l ^^^ -^ ^i^^^^if ^^Kl^4 .ssues 
have a wJpsent JntPrP^fP t\-7i'tf^''''' '•" literature, or science, or public policy, in which we all 
scholarlv men Thpt^,;j'"^''.there is enough of what is purely scholarly to satisfv purely 
We do norfe^Vn frnn^ }f '^'f„i?'i*' that pervades it everywhere is not the least of its inerit.s. 
nothin- of the ?nht?i^ pf r"-®^ *" "^wrt Church its connections belong, but we find in them 
dant ti?aces tn ;.Prfn<iiP^fi'!?/''TL ""'l' the half concealed Infidelity, of which we find so abun- 
!:^wl-o} in peiiodic^als of a like kind nearer home. All through iti x>i)."o^ we ino<-t witli •!, 

cordial recognition of Christianity and of the Bible This reverent te">no? is dsoM 
discussions of philosophy, and scfence, and poll ics Thelx^fJno sy.n it\ v wH t he^ 
in anv wlv "'^^olo^ t^J^ scientific men of our^day. Its readers will'not rina Th '!r t ti, God 
hlartvand^sin^PrP L 1 ?^ll'^ ^"^ '^''??"°*' "npairc'l: on the contrary, its religious tone is mo.st 
hlartUventlr^afnP.i nn?i i '^111 '^?^ ^7"^^} So?^mendation in these day.s"^ Its views of politics are 
iiearmy entertained and stoutly defended."— CAwrcA/TJou, Hartford, Conn., Aiig. 1, 1869. 



A:tERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Canadian Times. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY IX AUXl'KIOR, COUNTY OF RENFREW, ONTARIO. 

Circulation 1,10() copies. Tlie best medium for advertising among the lumbennen of the 

l'l>l)er Ottawa and its fltty tributaries. 

K.\TKS OF AI>VEKTISIX« : 

One column, 12 month.s, $">; 6 montli.'^, «40; ;! months, iS.JO: hiUf-coluinii in proportion ; 1-2 lines, 

or 1 inch by 2 1-4 inches of space, $1 I'or lir.st insertioxi; 20 cts. lor eacli sulisc<iuent : .!(» lines ^-2 

for first insertion, and 50 cts. for each subseriuent insertion. All f)rilcis lo Ijc given to 

GEO. P. KOWEI.I., Advertising AgeittH. 40 Park Row. X. T. 

The Androscoggin Herald. 

Piiblislied every Saturday, at MtFalls, >Ie.. bv ^V."»r. K. MOOI>Y. Editor &, Proprietor. 

TEK.M.S— $1 50 Pki! Axmm in Advantk. j^^- The* onlv newspaper published on the line of the 
Grand Trunk Railroad from Portland to Cana<la— ill a thriving village of ;i,000 inhabitants, and 
circulated through a wide tract ot sinifiundiiig countrv. 

AI>VEUTl.SIi\4J UATES: 

1 in. 1 w, $1; 1 m, i*l..'>0; .3 m, $2; (i m. ¥4 : 1 v, $s I 1-2 eol. 1 w. $5: 1 m,$8; 3m, $12.50; Um, $2.5: 1 v,|;50 

2 in. 1 w,$1.50: 1 ni. 82.2.-): .; m, if.!; i;iii..s';: ] y, .^12 I-t" 1 w..-f2..->0: Im, $4;. -Im, $ti.25 Mini, $12.50; ly. $2.'> 
Icol.l w,.*10: 1 ni. ?1<;: ;ini, ;?2.'>: Cui.S.'iu: ly.810o| ,s;/('<(„/.s- ddulMe rates; EdituriuU 10 cents a line. 

Messrs. Gen. 1". Kowcll ^V: ( o., 40 I'ark" Row, N. \ .. arc authoruied to contract at the above 
rates, and S. M. I'ctten^'ill ^^i Co., 10 ,<tate .street. I'.oslon, .^lass. 

Grand River Sachem. 

PIBLISIIKD WEKKl.V, 15V 
THO:»IAS MESSE.\«ER, Editor and Proprietor. 

Caledonia, Ontario, C a n .\ i> a . 

TERM.S— ONE DOLL.VK PER YEAR IN ADVANCE. 

TERMS OF ADVERTI«IXCJ : 

I square, 12 lines Nonpai-eil. 1 time, - $1 .50 I 1 sijuarc, 12 lines Nonpareil, .'i months, - ^(i oo 

I '• 12 " " 1 month, - ;i 00 | 1 " 12 " •' i; " - 10 00 

One .Square twelve lines Nonjiareil, one year. $15 

The Aylmer Times. 

Piiblislied Weeltly in Aylmer, County of Ottawa, l»rovii»ee of Qnebee. 

Is the only newspaper in the Counties of Ottawa, Pontiac and Argentcuil— population over 

80,000— lias 2,000 subscribers, besides a large advertising circulation. 

Rates of Advertisiuje; : 

Twelve linos of space, or 1 inch by 2 1-4, first insertion, $1; each subsequent insertion, 25 

cents; 30 lines, first insertion, $2; each subsequent insertion, .50 cents; 30 lines space, 3 months, 

$6, or $20 for 12 months; 1 column, 1 year, $75; (i months, $40; 3 months, $30. 

All orders for advertising to be given to our Agents, Gko. P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, N. Y. 

Carpenter, Kimball tc Burton, 

ATTOit\EVS AT EAW A^VO REAL ESTATE A<iE:VTS. 

HlllK. \/:OSf{(> COIXTY. KAXSAS:. 



KII»inAT.E &, nvHToyi, 

I'lihli^btrs of IVeo.sho Comity I>iHpat< li. 

The Saline County Progress. 

.MAUSII.VI.I., .nissol iti. 

The Pro;;reMH has a liu-fi' circiilalioii than t lircc-l'omtlis of the i-oiintrv papers in the Slate. 
I». .n. SAA'I»I4;E &, RK<».. IMibliMlierM. 
AflvertiHinit; itatcN : 

1 srpiare, one year, 

1 H<|uare, six months, 

1 square, throe months, .... 
4 sqinires one year, changeable qtnirlerly, 

F.ight lines of nonpareil type unleaded, or tlieir e<piivalent in space, make a scjuare. No ad- 
vertisement considered less tium a sipnirt 



$15 


1 


t <•( 


liiiiiii. 


oni^ yea 


10 


1 


J <•< 


hiniii. 


one \ea 


7 


1 


col 


mm, ( 


ne year. 


30 










irtl 


ei 


r e< 


iiivaU 


nt in sp; 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 287 



Daily Skandinavisk Post^ 



THE or,l>E«T S€A;VI>I]¥AVIAIV JOITRIVAL, IIV THE IJ]VITEI> STATES, 



THE o>'r.v sca:vi>i:vavia:« paper east of chica«o. 



HAS AX EXTENDED CIRCULATION AMONG THE DANES, NORWEGIANS AND SWEDE* 
FROM MAINE TO CALIFORNIA, 

MANY OF WHOM RKAI) XO OTHICIl LA.\(;iA(;K. rHKUEJ$Y 

Making it a desirable advei-lising meilium for tliosc who desire a sliare of the tradt' and 
patronage of tlio.se nationalities. 



WITH PLEASURE WE REFER TO THOSE WHO HAVE AND ARE NOW I'ATIiONIZING 
US THROUGH OUR ADVERTISINCi COLUMNS. 



Siibscrlptioit H^tes, Per Aiiniiiu : 

Daily, - _ _ - S» OO 

Seml-IVeekly, _ _ _ ;| ^^^^ 

VTeekljr, - - _ _ a oo 



Advertising Rntes ; 



Per line, .... go cents. 

Two to four weeks, .... 10 per cent, disenmit. 

Over four weeks, - - - 30 " •• 

Three months, . - - - 25 " ■ 

Six months, - - - - 30 •' 

Twelve months, - . - . 40 •• 

ttUSTAVUS OnOM, TSo. 2 >tott Street, IVcw York City. 

Or, Geo. 1". ItowKi,!,. & Co.. antliorizcd Agent>^. New York. 



288 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Terrebonne Patriot, 

THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IX SOUTHERN LOUISIANA. 



'-^Tho Ten-eboime Patriot is the Official Journal of the State of Louisiana, and also of the 
rarish of Terrebonno ami Citv of Ilounia. All the laws of tlie .State and legal notices are, by 
law, publishi-d in thi' PatrlotI If is placed on filo in tlic nffico of Secretary of the State, Gov- 
ernor, Licutcnant-ciovernor, and Siiciil<.T of till' llon-^e i)t Krpi-rsrniatives, also in the offices of 
the Attorncv-iifueral of llie >talc ainl ( Irrk of ihc Thir.! .Iii.licial District Court. 

Its larjie" circulation, ami ilic, iinnicu>i' aniouui ol territory over which it extends, makes it 
one of the most desirable and best advertising mediums in llie Slate of Louisiana. 

IT IS A THIRTY-TWO COLUMN PAPER, AND HAS A CIRCULATION SECOND TO NONE IN 
LOUISIANA, THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS EXCEPTED. 

Terms of Subscription : 

One copy, one year, 



One copy, six months. 
One copy, three months, 



Five copies, one year, 
Ten copies, one year, 



Club Rates i 



- $4 00 
•2 .50 

- 1 50 


§1.1 00 
•2.5 00 



Advertising Kates : 



1 square, 
■2 squares, 

3 squares, 

4 squares. 



1 month. 

$•2 50 
5 00 
7 00 
9 00 



3 mos. 

$G 00 
10 00 
14 00 
18 00 



6 mos. 
$!) 00 
15 00 
•20 00 
'25 00 



1 year. 1 montli. 3 mos. 6 mos. 1 year. 

$15 00 14 column, $1100 $-25 00 $40 00 $(iO 00 

25 00 1-2 " 18 00 40 00 60 00 !»0 00 

35 00 1 '• ^25 00 60 00 90 00 140 00 

4.5 00 1 1-4 inches space constitute a square. 

B. W. FRAIVCIS, Editor and Proprietor, 

Houma, ILiOusiana. 



The Portland Daily Press. 

THE tiEAnilVG POr.ITICAI. NE^VSPAPEB 12* MAIIVE. 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

PORTIiA^n PUBT.ISIIIJV<; COMPAiVT, AT IVO. IS EXCHAIVGE STREET, 

PORTI.AIV», MAIIVE. 

The circulation of the Press is larger than tliat of any olher political newspaper in the State. 
THE MAIIVE STATE PRESS 

Is (I weekly paper, published in connection with the 1>ally, and has an immense circulation 
among the Farmers, Mechanics and Working Men in every c(ninty of flic State. 

PiucK OF Daily, #s i-kk Ykah; Wi-.kki,y, l^2 vi:u Ykak. 

Rates of AdvertixiniB; : 

l»ailj' I'rrss.— Ordinary advcrfisoments, per sqiuire, 1 week, $1 5i); 1 month, $1 : 3 months, 
*10; 6 inonflia, '^18; 1 year, !?:t5. Special Notices one-third extra. Business Notices, '20 cts. per line. 

^V'eeUly Press.— One-third discount from price of Daily Fiiess. Business Notices, 15 cents 
per line. 



FBEOERICK ROBIE, Treasurer. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 289 



The Times. 



ItlWJirEY, CIiA.UDOX «& SHOTT, - - - - Editors and Proprietors. 

HOUSTON, HARRIS CO., TEXAS. 



THE CHEAPEST, MOST CIRCULATED, AND BEST NEWSPAPER IN TEXAS. 



The Times i« Publislied DaUy, Tri-Weekly and Weekly. 



THE TIMES, DAItrT, 



Has a larger circulation among the mercantile fraternity of the State than any other paper. 

Being published in the metropolis, in the centre of the State, it reaches the business men 

of the interior twelve hours ahead of the Galveston papers, and is for that reason 

preferred. Being the Democratic organ of the State, it is the people's paper. 

THE TIMES, TRI-WEEKIiT, 

Has the largest circulation of any tri-weekly paper in the State. It contains all the News by 
Telegraph, Special Correspondences, &c. 

THE TIMES, WEEKI.T, 

Is the cheapest paper and has the largest circulation of any paper in the State of Texas. It i» 

found in the hands of evei-y farmer, mechanic and business man in the State, and 

for manufacturers' advertisements is the best medium to be found. 

The Times, Daily, is published every day except Monday; the evening edition is published 
every day except Sunday. The Times, Tri-Weekly, is published every Tuesday, Thursday 
and Saturday. The Times, Weekly, is published every Sunday morning. 

Subscription Terms i 

Dally^er annum, $12; Daily, six months, $7; Daily, three months, *4; 

Tri-Weekly, per animm, $8 ; Tri-Weekly, six months, $5 ; Tri-Weekly, three months, $3 ; 

Weekly, per annum, $3 ; Weekly, six months, $2. 

IN united states currenoy. 

Advertising Rates : 

Transient advertisements, having the run of the paper first insertion, $1 per inch ; each sub- 
sequent insertion, 50 cents; advertisements inserted at intervals charged as new, each insertion. 















DAILY 
















Inches. 


1-2 m. 


1 m. 


2 mo. 


3 mo. 


6 mo. 


12 m. 


Inches. 


1-2 m 


1 m. 


2 mo. 


3 mo. 


6 mo. 


12 m. 


1 


$5 


^l 


^11 


$20 


$30 


$50 




7 


$22 


$34 


$68 


$85 


$105 


$198 


2 


8 


15 


28 


35 


60 


75 




8 


•24 


36 


72 


90 


110 


200 


3 


12 


20 


40 


50 


75 


100 




y 


26 


38 


75 


94 


115 


210 


4 


15 


24 


50 


62 


87 


125 




10 


28 


40 


78 


97 


120 


220 


5 


18 


28 


58 


72 


95 


150 




15 


35 


50 


85 


120 


150 


250 


6 


20 


32 


64 


80 


100 


175 






45 


60 


90 


150 


200 


350 



Advertising for the Tri-Weekly and Weekly at half the above rates. None but metal cut* 
inserted, and charges fifty per cent, additional. 

SPECIMEN copy SENT ON APPLICATION. 

Kinr:XEY, CLAUOOW a, SHOTT, Editors and Proprietors, 

Houston, Texas. 

Geo. p. Bovtell & Co., 40 Park Bow, New York, Agents. 
19 



290 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Liberal. 



A K£CORl> OF HOMK IV£:\V8 A]\I> OPI^'IO]V. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, IN GALESBURG, KNOX COUNTY. ILLINOIS. 

COXBrCTED BY STEPHJE K. SMITH. 

Tlie I,lbernl nc-sv.spappi' is liberal in politics and rplipion. I?<)i.i>, fkahlkss and inkki'EN- 
DE>T. Disc-usso8 leadinfjr topics in a terse <i isp tii;mncr, ami njiliolds the Kicirr. ret^ardless ot 
friend or foe. It contain.s eiRlit larf,'e pa.^( -, uiili ii\c broad i-ohnniis to tlie pa^e. ^\ iih clear, 
new type, on bookpajier. Ls the iiam>s(imi:m w i.i.ki.v in Illinois, and has the largest circulation 
in thc'city, county and adjoining States, ol any journal in the vicinity. 

Advei-tisin^ Rates: 

Transient, per quarter column, - - $3 50 I Annuallj' or semi-annually, per column, $i:i5 OO 
Transient, per half colums. G .50 | Cuts without extka chakgk. 



The St. Cloud Journal^ 

ST. CLOUW, MIAAESOTA. 

TIic liftrgest Paper (36 long columns,) in Northern Minnesota. Tlie Oldest Paper (e.stablished 
in 1857) in Northern Minnesota. Circulation iiuarniiti-td to be DOl'BHiE 

that of any other paper in Northern Minnesota. 

ONE OF THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUMS IN THE STATE. 
Bates of Advertising : 

1 w. 2 w. 3 w. 3 mo. Gmo. Mt. I 1 w. 2 w. 3w. 3 mo. 6 mo. I yr. 

1 square, $1 00 $150 $2 00 $6 00 $10 00 $15' 00 | 1-4 col., $4 75 $7 00 $9 25 $16.50 $25 00 $40 00 

2 " 175 2 75 3 50 8 00 14 00 22.5011-3 " GOO 900 1100 22.50 3750 5250 

3 " 2 50 3 25 4.50 1100 18 00 30 00 1-2 " 7.50 1125 14 00 30 00 45 00 75 00 

4 " 3 25 4 75 6 25 12 50 22.50 35 00 | 1 " 1100 16 50 20 00 50 00 75 00 125 00 

SuBSCKii'Tiox : $2 Per Year. 
Address W' B. MITCHELL, Piiblislier, St. Cloud, Minu. 

Or, Geo. P. Rowell & Co., No. 40 Park Row, New York City. 



The Upper Des Moines^ 

A SEVEA-COLUMN WEEKLY AEWSPAPEK. 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY, AT ALGONA, KOSSUTH COUNTY, IOWA, 
BY J. H. HVAKKEA-. 

Jt has a very large circulation, and advertisers will find it a good advertising medium. 

TERMS: TWO DOLLARS PER Y'EAR IN ADVANCE. 

Rates of Advertising : 

(TEN LINES CONSTITUTE A SQUARE.) 

One square, first insertion, $1 ; each subsequent insertion, .50 cts.; one square, three months. $4. 
One square, si.x months, - - $6 00 I One-half column, one year, - - - $30 00 

One square, one year, .... 10 0(i ()ue column, one year, - - - .5000 

One fourth column, one year. - 20 (id | IJusine.ss (ards nut exceeding six lines, 5 00 



The IVIemphis Conservative, 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY, Iiv lOIlN (JII.MIKV. 

MEMPHIS, SCOTL.A3VI> COITIVTY, MISSOIRI. 

The Con«erT'atlve is an excellent advertising medium, having a huge ami increasing 

circulation among, and being eagerh- sought for anil read bv the higher, 

l)etlerand wealthier class of society. 

SUBSCRIPTION I'KICK: TWO D()LL.\KS. 

Tenns of Advertising : 

Professional Cards, one year, - - - $S I One-half colnmn, one week, ----$" 

<1nc square, one week, I | One column, one week, 10 

One S(|uare, four weeks, 3 I One column, one year, 70 

On(> s(|uare, one year, 10 Kouiteen lines ISrevier make a square. 

One-fourth column, one week, - - 4 | Special Notices, hailed, per line, each issue. 10c. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 291 



Western $c Company's Publications 



ARE AMONG 



THE BKST AOVERTISIjVG MEOirMS IIV THE COUWTKT. 



THE ElVGIi^EERIIVG AlVD AIIiVIjVG JOURlVAIi, 

KOW IN ITS EIGHTH VOLUME, - - . . SIXTEEN LARGE PAGES WEEKLY. 

IT OFFERS UNEQUALEP ADVANTAGES TO 

MA]XTTFACTITRERS OF MACHIiVERT, 

AND ALL PERSONS WHO DESIRE TO SECURE THE ATTENTION OF ENGINEERS, IT BEING 
THE ONLY PAPER DEVOTED TO ENGLSEERING MATTERS IN THE COUNTRY. 



It« large and exclusive circulation in the gold, silver, coal, iron, oil, copper and lead mining 
districts places advertisements before a class of persons who are in constant want of steam 
machinery and tools, and who are not reached in a mass by any other publication. 

I*rices for Advertising ; 

On inside pages, per line, twenty-five cents, and on the outside or last page, per line, forty cents. 



THE MAHrUFACTTJRER AND BUHiDER. 

A MONTHLY INDUSTRIAL MAGAZINE OF THIRTY-TWO LARGE QUARTO PAGES, WITH 

UPWARD OF TWENTY BEAUTIFUL ENGRAVINGS IN EACH NUMBER. 

PRICE, FIFTEEN CENTS. 

A Rook at tlie Close of the Year of 384 Pages, -^^-ItU Upward of Two H»iiidred and 
Forty Eiigraviiig.s, for $1 50 ! 

THE CHEAPEST liVDlTSTRIAI^ PITRLICATIOA' IjV THE T^'ORLD, 

HENCE ITS VERY WU)E CIRCULATION. 

Advertisers who wish to reach Manufacturers, Builders, Architects and Mechanics, in the 
North, South, East and West, will find this paper an unequaled medium. 

TeriMS : Seventy-five cents per line, eacli insertion. 

Aildress ^VESTERIV &. COMPANY, Publishers, 

37 Park Row, Bfew York. 

Or, Geo. P. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents, 40 Park Ro\y, New York. 



293 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Kansas Courier. 



TWO DOLI, A US I'Klt ANMM IN ADVANCE. 
ADVEKTISIXG UATES : 

1-4 col. 1 year, - - $:50 | 1-2 col. 1 year, - - $55 | 1 col. 1 year,- - - $100 
BrsiXESS Card occupying .space of eight lines Konpareil per year, $1-2. 
Special Notices 15 cents per line. 
On all business pertaining to the Couiuer, address the Proprietor, 

J. P. COIVE, Seneca, Kansas. 



A CAR© TO BITSIIVESS MEIV. 

THE ATTENTION OF BITSINESS MEN IS DIRECTED TO THE FACT THAT 

The Frontier Democrat, 

PUBLISHED AT NEOSHO FALLS, BY I. B. BOYLE, 

[as a ^vide circulation in Sautheru Kansas, and is a i^ood advertising medium. 

Address for terms, I. B. BOTLiE, IVeoslio Falls, Kansas. 



The Bronson Heralde 

A FAMILY :XE^VSPAPEU, 

DEVOTED TO NEWS, AND TO MORAL, SCIENTIFIC, LITERARY, MISCELLANEOU 

AND LOCAL SUBJECTS. 

Published Weekly, at $2 a Year in Advance, at 

Itronson, lirniicli County, 3Iicli. 

The Herald i.s a good medium lor iidveii i>iiin- Kate.s : I'or Local and Business Notices, ten 

cents a line each insertion; for other ailvcrliscincnts, st^vcu cents a line, for the first, and five 

cents a line for each subsequent insertion. I'ayincnt strictly in advance. No deviation from 

these terms except bv special contract. 

M. BABCOCK & CO., Pnblisliers T. BABCOCK, Editor. 



Evansville Union. 

I>Air,Y A]V1> WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS. 

CIRCULATION THE LARGEST OF ALL GERMAN PAPERS IN INDIANA. 

RATES OF ADVERTLSING VERY LIBERAL. 

J. ESSIL,I:VG1:R, Publisher, Evansville. Indiana. 



The Constitutionalist. 

PITBLI.SIIED AT IVEW CASTLE, KY., 

EVERY THURSDAY MORNING, - .\T S2 OO PER ANNU.M. 

Ho Advertising received at les.s than published Rules. Circulation l.OOO. 

Geo. I'. RowELL & Co., 4o Park Row, New York Agents. 

W. A. IIOLLAIVI*. Publisher. 

The Elora Observer. 

(PROVI\'<'E OF 0.\TARIO. CAXA1>A.) 

AS BEEN PUBLISHED TKN YEARS is .\ L.AKCiF SlIKKT. ENJOYING A GOOD CIUCULA- 

TION IN THE COUNTY OF WKLI.I \( ; ION, AM) OFFLRS AN EXCELLENT 

MEDIUM FOR AI)VERTlSIN(i AM()N(i A MANUFACTURING 

AND a(;ricui.'h i; \i, i-oi-i i.ation. 

Rates of A<lv< itiMiii;; : 

Eight cents per lino, first insortion, and J cinls per line aflorwards; address cnrd.s of four 
lines, i?l per \ear; a whole coluTnn (21 inches), $ id per year, if:)5 for •; months, $2.") for :? months; & 
hrtir <(.)linnii,"ft:!.") for a year, i|!22 for (j months, sfi:'. for :i nioiitlis; a ((uartcr cohimn, |;2a for a y^^ar, 
$12 for U months, f 8 for 3 months. JOIIIW SMITH, Proprietor, Elora, Canada. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



J, W. Burke $e Co/s Periodicals, 



M A C O 3r , « K O R « I A 



SOUTHER-V CHRISTIAiV ADVOCATE. 

Piioes for Advertising j 

Ten cents a line for each insertion. Twenty-five per cent, discount on advertisemeiils con- 
tinued tliree montlis. No advertisements received for a longer time tlian tlirec months 
i)0 advertisements of Medicines or Medical Specialties admitted. 

Circtilatioii, 8,000 Copie:^. 

THE ADVOCATE IS AN OFFICIAL CHURCH PAPER FOR SOUTH CAROLINA, (iE(JRGIA 
XSJ) FLORIDA. 



BUKHES WEEKLT FOR BOYS A.^O GIRLS. 

THE ONLY ILLL^STRATED JUVENILE PAPER IN THE SOUTH. 

Prices for Advertising i 

First insertion, 10 cents a line ; 1 month, 8 cents a line ; ;! months, G cents a lino. 



BTTRKE'S WEEKLY 

Has a bona-Me circulation of 8,800 copies in all the Southern States, and is rapidly -rowing 

in popularity. 

THE SOUTHERiV FAR.>I AJVI* HOIttE. 

A FIRST-CLASS AGRICULTURAL MONTHLY. 

Bates of Advertising: 

One full paf,'e, first insertion, $25; each subsequent insertion, $15; half year, $75; one year, $I.-)0. 

1 month. 2 months. :i months. 4 months. 5 months. « months. 9 months. 12 m. 

$45 $53 $m $80 $100 

37 43 48 W 80 

33 38 42 56 74 

28 32 S.'j 47 G2 

20 24 28 40 54 

18 22 25 33 46 

Less than 1-4 column, twenty cents a line each insertion. 

The above periodicals are recognized as being among the best and cheapest advertising 

meumras in the South in which to advertise any class of business. Advertisers must pay in 

easn, and not in goods. This rule is invariable. 

They can be found on file at the Advertising Agency of Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 40 Park Row, 
^ew York, where contracts for advertising may be made. 



1 column, $15 


$2G 


$30 


3-4 column , 13 


22 


30 


2-3 column, 12 


20 


27 


1-2 column, 10 


17 


23 


1-3 column, 7 


12 


10 


1-4 column, 5 


10 


14 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



THE TOWN TAI.K, 

A. I. MAT II Eli. I'iil)li:*hcr, 

KOCKLAM), .MAINK. 

CIRCULATION' 5,000 COPIES. 

Advertising Bates: 

$1 per square flr.sl insertion ; 7.5 cents for subse- 
quent insertions; Editorials T) cts. per line. 
2fo discounts from these rates. 



STA>i>AKI>, 

BURLIMJTON, WlSCOXSm. 
A WEEK L Y JOURNAL. 
Two Dollars per year. Advertising at tlie 
usual country rates. 

H. L. DEVEREUX, 
Editor and Publisher. 



THE BOIilVAR FREE PRESS, 

JAMES DUMARS, 
E D I T o K A.VD Publisher. 

Official journal of Polk, Dallas and Hickory 
counties. Yearly subxTiiition, in advance, $2. 



MIXXESOTA SOI TH-n'EST, 

Publisheil at Blue Earth City, Minnesota, by 

L. CAVANNA, and edited by 

CARR HlNTINCiTON. 

It is the oldest, largest ami best advertising 

medium in South-west Minnesota. 

Terms: §1 .50 pe r year . 



ADVERTISEMENTS FOR SOUTHERN MINNESOTA 

SHOULD APPEAR IN THE 

FREE H OI E S T E A 1> , 

WINNEIiACO CITY, MINNESOTA. 

.Send for sample eopy. 

THE SCIKKH. .nOATIIIiT. 

MINERAL POINT, WIS. 

Pi liLISHKl) J5Y 

S. D. GAVLORD, Editor and Proprietor. 
Advertising; Rates : 

page, \ year, - •$'') \ l^pnf/e,\ month, ■ $10. 
For special rates, addiess the Editor. 



GOWAIVDA (IV. Y.) WEEKLY GAZETTE 

Is devoted to the advocacy of sound Republican 
principles. Temperance, "the advancement of 
local interests, and thi; diftnsion of general in- 
telligence. JOHN .s. bIDLER, 

Publisher ami Proprietor. 



liEACH & BATES, 



LAND AND COLLECTION AGENTS, 



TRAVERSE CiTV, MiCH. 



BEBFORB COITA'TY PRESS, 

Published at Bloody Run, Pa. Best advertis- 
ing medium in Southern Pa. Lower rates.than 
my other paper in the neighborhood. Address 
D. S. ELLIOTT, Publisher, 
Bloody Run, Penn. 



THE TAYtiORSVILiLE Fi:,AG, 

JNO. J. SQUIER, PROPRIETOR, 

Terms: $2 00 per annum, in advance. 

Advertising Rates : 

Ten Cents per Link, - each insertion 

JOINER'S FREACHTOWiV PRESS, 

FRENCHTOWN, N. J. 

THE PAPER OF THE COUNTY. 
LARGE CIRCULATION. 

75 cts. per square, of H» lines, first insertion. 
THE BOt,r,IiVGER CO. 8TANBARB, 

Published evciy Thursday, at Marble Hill, Mo., 
BY MURDOCH & ADAMS. 
Circulates in every county in South-east Mis- 
souri. The best paper in South-east Missouri 
to advertise in. 



I^AKE'S CHAUTAUaiA FARMER, 

PUBLISHED AT FORRESTVILLE, X. Y. 

Circulation 2,000 and rapidly increasing. Agri- 
cultural ailvertisemcnt.s solicited. 
O^'EGO TRABE REPORTEK, 
Published by C. II. Keeleu, Job Printer, 

OwE(;o, N. Y. 

Goes to every house in Owego. Send (from 

either counti-yorcity) and get our lo-w prices 

before yon get yoxxr job printi ng do ne. 

TVHIG A.\B REPUBEICAN, 

(JUINCY, ILLINOIS. 
lL.eading Baily Paper of tlie City. 

Established 18:i7. 

ADVERTISING RATES VERY MODERATE. 



THE AMERICAiV ^VORKMAJV. 

Boston, Mass. 
THE ONLY LABOR PA I'KK 1 N NEW ENGLAND. 

The organ of 'iDiMiod meelninics. 
Advertising Rates: *:! per inch per month. 
Handsome 8-page paper. Send for free speci- 
mens. 



THE MESSENGER 

Is the leading weekly paper in Warren Co. An 
inch, 1 time, $1; 2 times, $1 .^O: 1 year, $10; 1-2 
col., 1 year. $00; 1 col., 1 yr., $100. 

NORMAN COLE, Publisher, 
Cor. Ridge and Warren Sts., 
Glen's Falls, N. Y. 



ABVERTISER ANB TRIBUNE, 

DETROIT. 

LEADING DAILY PAPER OF MICHIGAX. 

ADVERTISING R.\TES : 

Baily, lO and .5 cts. per line ; Weekly, aOc. 

IIERALB, 

Mt. Joy, Lancaster (the Garden) Co., Pa. 

$1 .50 a year in advance. Advertising rates per 

inch space: 1 time .50c., 1 mo. $1, 6 mos. $4, I 

vear $«. Reading matter 10c. a line each time. 



SOFTH JERSEY REPUBLICAN, 

IIAMMONTON, N. .1. 

I The only county paper, and the leading paper 
ofthe vicinity: circulating also in Cape May and 
Burlington counties. Hatc^ s,i)t on application. 



CITY ANB COUNTRY, 

NYACK, ROCKLAND CO., NEW YORK. 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY. 
Terms: $2 00 per annum. 



NATIOA.VL, 1>E.>10CRAT. 

Peoria, III. 
Circulation, - - - Daily. .5,000; Weekly, 0,000. 
Rates of .Xdvertising : $20 per sipnire (eight 
lines Nonp.) for either daily or weekly, per an- 
num; I? Ill lor holh. 

\V. T. 1)(»\VALL, Proprietor. 

R 10 i» I' B 1., I C A N . 

KENTON, O. 

Ofllcial paperof llardinCo. Circulation 1,200. 
Advertising rates : $1 per sqr. for first insertion-, 
50c. for each additiomil. 

HUNT & MILLER, Proprietors. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



296 



Caldwell County Sentinel. 



ESTABLISHED IIV 1867. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY 



THE "SENTINEL" IS PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY, AT KINGSTON, MISSOURI. 



AlVSOlV B. Mll^tS, Editor and Proprietor. 



Rates of Advertising z 



'One column, 1 year, 

" 6 months, 

" 3 " 

One-half column, 1 year, 
" " 6 months, 

" " 3 



One-foui-th column, 1 year, 

<> months. 



One square, I year, 

fi months, 



$20 
12 
7 
8 
5 
i 



Twelve lines Brevier one square. 

Local Notices ten cents per line for one insertion. 

Regular advertisements in local column ten cents a line for each insertion, to be marked with 
number of paper in which the advei-tisement commenced. 

No extra charge for leaded advertisements, as they are charged for space occupied. No 
-extra charge for cuts or display. 

Our Agents are Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., of New York, and Sheffield & Stone, of St. 
Louis, Missouri, who will receive and receipt for advertising. 

We should be happy to receive your orders for the Sentinel. 



Rates for Subscription ; 
One Copy, One Tear, 

Six iHouths, 
" " Four " 



$1.50 
.75 
.50 



Tour orders for advertising may be contracted with our Agents as stated above, or 
address the Proprietor, 



AJTSOW B. MllitiS, Kingston, Missouri. 



296 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK 



C 1 R C r r, A T E YOUR A 1> V E K T I S IC :»I E ->■ T S Il\ THE F A :»I I r, T 

The New Dominion IVIonthly 

IS HEAD IN 
THOrSAJVl>S OF C^l^fAOEVJV HOMES, 

AND 18 
THE ONLY LITEUAUY MONTHLY IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 



THE ADVANTAGES OF THE NEW DOMIIVIOIV MOIV'THliT AliE ALMOST UNEQUALED- 
For Advertising Every Business tliat Concerns the Welfare of tlie FemUy. 



Advertising Rates j 

Fly Leaves per Page, ...... $10 00 per month 

*' Half Page, ..... i; oo 

" " Quarter Page, - - - - - - ;; .")0 " 

" One-eighth Page, - - ■ - - -2 (K) 

Printed Leaves stitched in - - - - - - 1 00 per 1,000 

JOHIV MOITGALL & SON, Proprietors, 

126 St. James St., Montreal, Canada^ 



Avon Journal. 



PUBLISHED EVERY T H II K S I) A Y M O R N I N G , 

BT CEORGE &, MORTON, 

AT AVON SPRINGS, - - LIVINGSTON COUNTY, - ■ - NEW YORK. 

Terms t $1 ."»0 Per Year, in Advance. 

A FIRST-CLASS LITERARY, FAMILY, LOCAL AND BUSINESS JOURNAL. 

We .'should bo ploasod in rocoivo orders to puhlisli ndvorti.sements in the Journal. This 

paper conniicnds itscii til udxcrliscis (in tlK^'roiind that it is published at the cclebratetl Min- 
eral Sprinf<s, wliicli iii-c visiinl liy nniri' tlian -io.oiio pcdplc yearly from all parts of the United 
States and the Canadas. it is ably edited by one of .America's 

GREATEST POETS, W. H. <\ HOSMEB, BARI» OF AVON. 



Advertising Rates : 

One-quarter column, one year, ...--- $30 

One-lialf " " (!0 

One " " 100 

Includinj.' Kditorial Notices and change every three months. Advertisements for less than' 
oae year will be charged at a higher rale. 

Circulation nearly 1,.500, and constantly increasing. 

All comtnui.icatidnH must be addressed to 

GEOR<i;E & MORTON. Publishers, 

P. O. Box 45, Avon Springs, I.,ivtngstou Co., N. Y. 

The paper will \h: found on file at Glo. P. Rowtcix & Co.'S Advertising Agency, where adver 
taeing contract,^ nuiy be made. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 297 



The Pittsburg Daily Dispatch. 

THE liEADIlVG DAIIiY PAPER OF \VESTElt3I P E IVIV STI. V ANI. 

AND ONE OF THE 
CHEAPEST AlVO BEST IVEWSPAPERS IIV THE IT]VITEI> STATES. 



The Daily Digpatch was established in 1846, and since then its career has been one of un- 
inten-npted prosperity. It has been for years the official paper of Pittsburg, Allegheny city and 
Allegheny county, and is also the official organ of the different County Courts and the Boroughs 
of Birmingham, East Birmingham, Ormsby, Braddocks, Sharpsburgh, Temperanceville, West 
Pittsburg, South Pittsburg, Monongahela, Millvale, &c. 

The Dispatcli is delivered by carriers every morning to over 11,000 subscribers, and has an 

aggregate circulation of MORE THAIV I>OIIlil,E that of any other paper 

in the State outside of Philadelphia. 

Besides its large local circulation, it is widely read in evei-y town and village within one 
hundred miles of Pittsburg, and, as a medium through which to reach the people of 

Tl^entern Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio or ^Vestern I'irginia, including Dealers, Traders 
and Piofessional Men, it cannot be Excelled. 



The Weekly Dispatch^ 

ESTABLISHED SOME TWENTY YEARS AGO, 

Is a I/arge Eight-Page FamUy Paper, and. Being Furnished at the Low Price of $1 
Per Tear, has a Very Extensive Circulation. 

It goes to over Eleven Hundred Post-offices in Pennsylva]iia, Ohio and Western Virginia, 
and is one of the best weeklies published. 



Terms of Advertising in Daily s 

07)6 square, nine lines Agate. 

One Insertion, - - - - 75 cts. I Three months. - - - - $24 00 

One month, - - - - - $11 00 Six months, - - - - - 42 00 

Two months, - - - - - 19 00 1 One year, - - - - - 75 00 

Local Notices, twenty cents per line. Fist Notices and advertisements on first page, donbl* 
the above rates. Advertising in ^Veekly the same per line as in Daily. 

The Daily Dispatch is printed on clear new type, is published in folio foi-ni, and is 
altogether one of the neatest and most attractive papers in the country. 

ORDERS FOR ADVERTISING RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED. 



O'STEir,!:, <fc ROOH, Pioprietors Daily Dispatch, 
Dispatch Iron Buildings, 

67 and 69 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa, 



2!)8 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BUUX. 



£STAUI.ISH£I> 1850. 

Port Byron Times. 

BEST ADVKKTISIXG MKDIUM FOR NOHTUKRN CAYUGA. 

Pliu.ishki) Evkky Tiksuay, 

III tlir Tiiiit's ICuililiiij^, I'oit Ityroii, iVe^v York, 

KV C. MAKSH. 

DEVOTED TO LOCAL. GENERAL AND POLITICAL NEWS. 
Teiius, $2 Per Anuiiin — A«lv«-rtisins Rates sent on apijlicatlon. 

BOOK AND. lop, OFFICE ATTACHED. ... - OFFICE AND jVLVTEKI A L ALL NEW. 

The St. IWary^s Vaquero 

IS P U li L 1 .s II E i) \V E E K L Y , 



St. iWary's, Texas. 
G. A. BEEIIIAIV, Editor and Proprietor. 



KATE.S OF ADVERTISING: 

One square, first insertion. - - $1 00 1 One column, one year, .... $8000 

Each subsequent insertion, - - 50 Half column, oneVear, - - - .50 00 

One square, one year, - - - - 10 00 | Quarter column, o'nc year, - - 30 00 

The Liberal, 

AW A T 11 K I S TI t" J O U R ]V A L, . 

The LiHKRAL circulates extensively among the intelligent and well-to-do classes. 

TERMS OF ADVERTISIIVG : 

One inch, one insertion, ..... .-,o (•<"nts. 

One inch, each .subsequent insertion. - - - -I't •• 

Reading Notices, per line, each insertion, - ■ -JO ■' 

NO IMPOSITION OR INDECENCY ADVERTISED AT ANY PRICE. 

.Address, lor specimen, the Editor, 

JAMES ^V.IT^UEU, 1«2 .Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Presbyterian Banner. 

IVO, 7U rillltl> AVEIVUE, PITTSBURGH, PEWIVSYLVAIVIA. 

A 1 lasT-CLASs Kici.KJioirs Weekly. 

REST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN THE PRESBYTEUIAN CHURCH. 

REV. JAMES AI>T.,ISOIV, I». !>., ;,,,.. , „ , ^ 

ROBT. PATTEUSOI\, A. M., ' | 1^ »»»♦"»• » a " «» 1* >• o p r 1 e t o r s . 

TRANSIENT AI)VERT1SIN(; RATES: 
Advertisements for a less period than threi- months counidered transient, and to be paid in advanc4. 
Ordinai-y advertisement per line, 1.') ds. I Notices iicr line, - - - 20 cts. 
Announcement column per line, '2:') cts. | Business Notices per line, - 15 cts, 
Yearly Advertisinju^ Ratex : Advertisenients less tlian thirty lines, per line, $4. Adver- 
tisements thirty lines and upward, i)er line, $;{. Acldrcs.s 

JAMES ALLISOiV ^ CO., Pittabm-gh, Pa. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 299 



The Sunday Morning Gazette, 



WASiriXGTOX CITY, D. C. 



A FAVORITE FAMII^Y JOlTRlVAIi. 



THE MOST POPULAR, ATTRACTIVE AND ENTERTAININCi NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED 
AT THE NATIONAL CAPITAL. 



in literary reputation and excellence it is not surpassed by any journal of its class in the country. 



ITS ANSWERS TO CORRESPOIVDEIVTS 

Are generally conceded to be the most learned and instructive to be found in the colunuis ot 
any newspaper, and ai-e alone worth the priee of subscription. 



THE SriVDAY MOR]\IiVG GAZETTE 

Is the recognized organ of fashionable Metropolitan Society at the Federal Cily, and 
faithful chronicler of events during the gay season. 



TO ADVERTISERS 

Who wish to reach a class of purchasers in the District of Columbia wliose patronage is profit- 
able, the Gazette offers most excellent advantages, while its circulation throughout 
the countrj- is rapidlj- extending into every State and Territoiy 



RATES OF ADVERTISI^VG: 

Ordinary Advertising, - - 10 cents per line. 1 Special Notices, - - - -20 cents per line. 

•City Items, 15 " " " | 

A liberal deduction made on continued advertisements. 



SIJBSCRIPTIOIV PRICE (PAYABLE IIX ADVAJVCE): 

One Copy one year, $2 50 I Ten Cojiies one year, with an extra copy to 

Five Copies one year, - - - - 10 00 1 gettcr-up of the Club, . . . - j 

Parties getting up a club of ten will be allowed to add single subscription.s at any 
time thereafter at Two Dollars each. 



SUIVDAY MORIVIJVG GAZETTE, 
Wasliingtou BuUdiiig^, TVaslilngtou City, ». C. 



300 AMEIIICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

Penn Yan Express. 

A Tlitrty-t-vvo <'olumii Weekly I^itevary «ii<l Fujuilj- ::Vewspaper. 

Republican in politics iiiid iulvocating Terapuranco. Circuhiting- widely among a population 
ossciitiully agricultural, horticultural, fruit, grape, hops and wool growing— in the most fertile 
section of the State, between the Lakes of Seneca, Keuka and Canandaigna. celebrated for tlie 
beauty of its scenery and the number of Medicinal Springs. THOMAS UOBINSOX AND C. G. A. 

Trice of Subscription, $2 per annum, in advance. Rates of Advertising: One col. of 30 inches, 
per year, $100; one week, $12; shorter advertisements, or of le.«s space, at corresponding reduc- 
tions: special and editorial notices inserted for 10 cents per line. 

THO:HAS ROBi::VSO:V, Pmb. and Prop., Peiin Tan, Yates Co., ]V. Y. 



Allegan Journal. 

PUBLISHED LVKKY MONDAY, AT ALLEGAN. ALLEGAN CO.. MICH. 

I>. C. IIl{;3ri>i:KSO]V, Editor and Proprietor. 

Advertising Rntcs : $1 OO per square of lO Ijines, each insertion. 

The Allegan Joitknal is the old established paper of Allegan, having been first publlshe<T 

in 1850, ami has the largest circulation (principally in Allegan county), 

and is consequently the 

BEST MEDIUM FOB A»VERTISI]V« IIV AL^LEGAIV COUIVTY. 



Wadsworth Enterprise. 

A.'v i>'i>epe:v»eat :vicwspaper. 

The best interests of the community, socially, morally and politically, are duly considered. 
Circulates largely in an intelligent community. $1 HO per year. Sample copies sent on receipt 
of stamp. Adverlisins Bates : 

1 sqr,4w., $1 25; Smos. $3 2.5; 6mos.$5; 1 vr. $8 I l-2col.,-i w. $8 .50; 3mos. $l.'5;6mos. $24; Iyr.$35- 
3 " 4 " 3 25; 3 " G ,50; 6 " 10; 1 " 10 1 " 4" 1200;3 " 22;6 •' 35;1" 60 
1-4C01.4 " 4 75; 3 " 10 50; " 10; 1 " 24 | 

The publisher reserves the right of rejecting all advertisements not suitable for hi»- 
colunms JOH]V A. Ci:,.*RK, ^Vadswortli, Ohio. 



The Adrian Weekly Journal. 

PrBI.ISlIKl> AT A1>K1AN, MlflllGAA'. 

CIRCULATION 1,600, 400 LAKCiElt THAN ANY OTHER PAPER IN THE COUNTY. 

TERMS: $a OO PEJi YEAR. IN ADVAXCE. 

JAPHETH CROSS, Proprietor. A. C. MIliI^ER, Editor^ 

TERMS OF ADVERTISING: 

1 col., 1 year, $100 | 1-2 col., 1 year, $.50 | 1-4 col., 1 year, $25 | 1-8 coU 1 year, *15. 

Geo. p. Kowkll & Co., Ag('Tits for advertising for this paper. 

Politics— l>emocra4ic. Largest, Best and Cheapest Paper in Lena^vee County. 

The Wlichigan Argus. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT ANN ARBOR, MICH., 
BY EEIHIJ B. POjVW. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN IS LOCATED AT ANN ARBOR, 

With Literary, Medical and Law Departments, and over 1,200 Students, makijig the 

AR<a S A V.IT.I ABT.E AI>\ ERTl.srvtJ .nEDJCM. 

X :l'.>-«'oluiim Folio, .fa OO a Y^ar. 

The Soldiers^ Record. 

THE T.AR<iEST AA'1> BEST SOI.OIIOKS' PAPEB IX THE COFIVTRY. 

As the Ollicial Organ of the (irand Army ol the Kcpublic, independent and non-partisan, 
Its circulation cxtiMKls from MainiMo Calilornia. It is not only a pai)cr lor the soUhcr, but for 
the family coniaining interesting reminiscences of the war, biographical sketches ot our 
gallant snl'dii IS, reginicnial histories, a carefully selected news sunnnary, and a large variety 
of good miscellaneous reading. H is oneofthe best mediums for extensive advertising in the 
country, and rapidly increasing in circulation. 

RATIOS OF AOVIORTISI-Vti : 
tl per square (10 lines), each inscrlion. business Notices, per line, 15c. Payment in advance, 
>V. F. VVAEIiKB. IMiblisiier, a State St., Hartford, Couu. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 301 



Merchants^ $c Manufacturers^ Bulletin. 



PUBIilSHE© WEEKr-T, AT CUVCUVKTATI, OHIO, 



CIRCULATIOX 12,000. 



THE OIVIiT FIRST-CLASS COMMERCIAL, NEWSPAPER IW CIIVCIWNATI, 

Axkd the £<argest, ^v'itli one or t^vo exceptions, in tHe TVest or South. 

CIRCULATES EXTENSIVELY AMONG THE BUSINESS MEN THROUGHOUT THE STATES 

OF OHIO, INDIANA, KENTUCKY, TENNESSEE, WEST VIRGINIA, 

AND ALL THE SOUTHERN STATES. 

C^~ Sent to over 1,000 Hotels and Reading Rooms in the \¥est and South. ~Ca 



It is exclusively a Merchants' and Manufacturers' journal, and is industriously and ener- 
getically conducted in these interests. As a medium between the Manufactui-ers, the Jobber 
and the Retailer, it has no rival in the entire West, and therefore occupies a field that is suscept^ 
ible of intiuite cultivation. 

For a specialty offering these advantages, its rates are low; and it is declared by many of it« 
present patrons to be superior to any publication with which they have had business relations. 
We feel assured that this will be the expei-lence of all who test the advertising capabilities of 

the I5ULLETIN. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION I 

One Copy, one Year, by MaU, in Advance, - - - _ - $3 OO. 



RATES OF ADVTiRTISIlVO i 



Card in Directory, one year, in advance, 



One square, eight lines, one time", - " - $1 00 

Each additional insertion, - - - 75 

One column one time, - - - - 40 00 

Each additional insertion, - - - 30 00 



Half column one time, . . - . §2,5 00 

Eacli additional insertion, - - - J.lOO 

One-fourth column one time, - - - 12 00 

Each additional insertion, ... lo 00 



For special advertisements, address the publishers. 
*S" Sample copies of paper sent on application. 



T. J. SMITH & CO., Publishers, 

60 >Vest Fourth St., Cincinnati, Oliio. 



aoa AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

St. Joseph Daily $t Weekly Union^ 

ST. JO.SKPH, MISSOrRI. 
The Official Paper of tlie War l>epartinent lii St. Joseph. 

THE O X I. Y RADICAL DAILY PAPER I X T H E D I S T P. I C T 
HAS A\ EXTEXSIVK AND COXSTANTLY IXCREASIXG CIliCVLATlON. 



Terms of Suhscriptioii : 

Daily, by mail, per year, - - $9 00 | Weekly, by mall, ]ior year. 



Rates of Advert! sin j; : 

1 square, (8 lines ordinary type) 1 insertion, $1 00 I Half column, one year, S175 

Each additional insertion," 50 | One column, one year, '.illy 

In the Weekly edition the same, and 50 per cent, additional for both. 

ATRES St, CO., Piihlishers, St. Joseph, Mo. 



The Republican^ 



MAYSVIl,t,E, MliA'TrCKY. 



THE OFFICIAL PAPER. - - - - PUULISIIEI) EVERY SATURDAY. 



IIa8 a I.,arKer ('irciilntion In IVorth-enstern Kentucky and Southei-n Ohio than any 
other Paper I>ubli.shed in Kentncky. 



AOyKUTISEIifi SllOri.l) MAKE A XOTK OF THIS. 

Address 

THOMAS A. DAVIS, ICditor and Proprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The American Law Times 



OFFICIAl. JOURlVAr, OF THE COURTS A1¥D DKPARTilIENTS. 



THE LARGEST AND CHEAPEST LAW AND OFFICIAL PAPER PUBLISHED IK 

AMERICA. 



Its Specialties.— It is the onlj- organ wliicli gives full and reliable information fouching the 
iTilings, orders and promulgations of the Executive Departments of the United states. 

It is the only organ which gives full and reliable reports of the decisions of the United 
States Courts. It is the only organ which gives complete Oftlcial Lists of Government Proclama- 
tions, Bills Approved and other acts of the Executive. 

Its contents embrace the decisions of the Pension, Patent and General Land Offices, to be 
found in no other work, the Circulars of the Commissioners of the Treasui-y Department, late 
opinions of the Attorney-General, unpublished decision of the State Courts, &c., &c. 

Its Circulation covers every State and TerritoiT in the Union. It reaches all the United 
States Courts, prominent Libraries, State Capitals, &c., &c. It is steadily growing, and in parts 
of the South is taken by all the lawyers of a county without exception. To parties interested in 
the southern trade, it offers the greatest inducements. Every number is preserved and the 
advertisements with it. 



RATES OF ADVERTISING FOR 1870. 

VTliole Page One insertion, $100; three months, $-200: six months, $300; one year, $.'>00. 

One-half Page One insertion, $fiO; three months, $100; six months, $1.50; one year, $-JO0. 

One-quarter Page One insertion $3G; three months, $60; six montlis, $85; one year, $125. 

Less than one-quarter page 50 cents per agate line each insertion. 

SUBSCRIPTIOIV PRICE : 

One Copy one year, - - - - - - $6 00 

Six Copies one year, - - - - - - .32 00 

Twelve Copies one year, .... - .-,.■, oo 

Back Volumes bound, ..---- 7 50 each. 



THE AMERICAN LA^V TIHIES, 

I^oc^v Box No. 29, Wa.9liington, I>. C. 



304 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Essex Gazette, 



A^'n TioE-TfATER ai>vertisi:b. 

PTTBI.ISnEI> WEEKLY, AT TAPPAHAJV]^OCH, VA. 



SUBSCRIPTION, - - $2 50 PKK ANNUM. 



Being centrally located and the only paper published in tide-water V^irginia, com- 
posed of the counties of Essex, King George, Caroline, Westmoreland, Richmond, King and 
Queen, King William, Gloucester, Mathews, Middlesex, Lancaster, and Northumberland, it 
clTers rare inducements and liberal terms to Advertisers. 

J. G. CAJVIVOJV, Publislier. 

The Knights of Pythias Journal. 

Pnljlished Semi->Ioutlily, by A. M. HOPKIiVS, «fc CO., 

740 SANSO.M STREET, I'HILADKLRHl A, PENN. 

Subscription, $1 SO per annum in advance. 

The Knights of Pythias Journal is the Official Orjjaii of tlie Order, and the only paper 
published in its interests in the country. The Order now numbers about one hundred and fifty 
thousand, and is fast increasing in all sections of the country from Massachusetts to California. 
The Journal has subscribers in every Lodge in the country. Advertisements of an unobjec- 
tionable character will be inserted at the following rates, payable in advance: 

Single insertion, fifteen cents per line. 
1 inch, 1 month, - - - - $3 1 1-3 column, 3 months, - - - $20 

1 inch, 3 months, - - - - - 6 1-3 column, 1 month, - - - - 15 

1-4 column, 1 month, - - - 8 | 1-2 column, 3 months, . . - 30 

1-4 column, 3 months, - - - - IS I 1 column, 1 month, - - - - 30 

1-3 column, 1 month, - - - 1-2 | 1 column, 3 months, ... 50 

These rates are low in consideration of our circulation, and will not be varied. Sample 
copies sent by mail when desired. Address all communications on business to 

A. M. HOPKIIVS & CO., 740 Sausom St. Pliiladelphla. 



The American Educational Monthly. 

DEV OTED TO POPCIiAR IIVSTRUCTIOHr AMD LITERATURE. 
91 50 Per Annum, Single IVnmbers, 15 cent*. 

" Interesting and Valuable to all who have Children to Educate or School Taxes to Pay." 



ITS CIRCULATION EXCEEDS THE COIMBINED CIRCULATION OF ALL OTHER EDUCA- 
TIONAL MONTHLIES PUBLISHED IN AMERICA. 

J. ^V. SCHERMERIIORIV & CO., Publishers, 
14 Bond Street, 'Xew York. 




Our Illustrated Catalogue 



SCIIOOI., MATERIAL,, FOR 1«00 A:%1» '70, 

REPRESENTS APPARATUS, BOOKS, CHARTS, GLOBES, MAPS, 

SCHOOL FURNITURE OF SEVERAL SUPERIOR MODERN 

STYLES, AND MANY OTHER " ARTICLES FOR 

EVERY SCHOOL." 

ittr Mulled on demand with stamp. 

J. ^Y. SCIIEIIMEUIIORW &- CO., 
Publishers and Mauufucturera, 14 Uoud St., IVew York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Boston Courier 

Has been Establislied in the cliief city of IVew Kngland for nearly Half a <'entni-y, 
and is a ^vell-kno-^vn tliorouglily Conservative Paper. 



With its many thousands of familiar readers it needs no self-made eulogium on the part 
.of its conductors. 

To otliers, it may be proper to say, that the aim of thos-^ in charge of this paper has been 
..und is to make it unsurpassed for the interest and utility of its reading matter in all its varied 
.departments. 

Besides its miscellaneous contents, always carefully guarded, so as to make it a welcome 
.<lomestie visitoi', its columns constantly furnish thoughtful and well digested articles upon 
polities, finance, literature, music, and'thc drama, and upon all topics relating to the social, 
moral, and religious interests of the country and the world. 

It is believed that no paper in the United States has an abler list of contributors and cor- 
respondents at home and abroad. 

Its long establishment, its local habitation, and its steadfast adherence to the fundamental 
principles of our free republican institutions, have combined to keep attention alive to the 
fCouRiEK, to strengthen its position, and to advance its reputation. 

All persons, of whatever political opinions, admit both its ability and its honesty. 

A standing like this, in a daj' of too many frivolous, changeable, and untrustworthy news- 
papers, is a distinction too marked not to deserve observation. 

It is also believed that, for the reasons thus stated, the Courier, highly valued as it is in the 
State of its publication and the neighboring States, is well known and highly esteemed in dis- 
tant parts of the country, where the very names of most Xorthern and Eastern papers have 
never been heard. 

The advantages of advertising in a paper of such a reputation, and so widely circulated, 
-.must be obvious to business men in evei-y part of the United States. 



ADVERTISIIVG RATES: 



Ordinary Advertising, per line, - - 12 1-2 cts. I Reading Notices (solid), per line, - - 20 cts. 
>5pecial and Business Notices, per line, 15 cts. | Reading Notices (leaded), per line, - - 25 cts. 



TERMS TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

" Tlie Boston Conrier " is published every Friday, at $2 50 per annum, by mail. 

" Tlie Sunday Courier/' designed more particularly for local circulation, is published 
.«ve,ry Sunday morning, at $S OO per annum. 



20 



GEORGE I.IT:vT &. CO., Proprietors, 

IVo. S4 Congress Street, Boston. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The New Church Independent. 

[ESTABI^ISHEO IX lS5a.] 

A .SWKDKNBOltGIAN MONTHLY, ITBLISHEI) BY WKLI.KR & MKTCALF, AT 
Ilia Porte, l<a Porte County, Indiana. 

Twentj'-four pages and advortisiny cover, devoted to tlie IIeav(!nly Doctrines of the New 
Jerusalem as revealed by Kinaiiiul Swcdeiiboif^. 

Tfi-ius: Two I>ollnrs Per Annum. 

It has a circiihition in every state ot tlic rnion, also in the NN'est Indies an<l (ireat Britain. 
Our Advertising Rates are ten cents jier line for each insertion on cover, and 15 cents per line- 
for Special Notices. A liberal discount for subsecjnent insertions. 

The Fulton Democrat. 

>lcCOXIVKT>t,SRrRt;, PKXX. 

PUBLI.SIIKI) EVERY THURSDAY MORNIN<i. 

Tlie I>enioi-ratic Organ of Fulton County, and has tlie Largest Circulation in tl»e- 
County. Circulation Eight Hundred. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM IT I.'* UNSURPASSED IN THIS SECTION. 

Atlvertisenicnts inserted at the following rates: 1-4 column, three iiionths, $12; six months- 
$18; 1 year, $2.); 1-2 col., ;i mo., $20; i; mo., $:jO: 1 vr., $l.'i: 1 col., :! mo., $40: t; mo., ?.i.5; 1 yr., $70. 
Address S. M. ROBIASOX, Kdifor and Publisher. 

The Tomahawk. 

A MONTHLY JOIRXAL, DEVOTED TO FUN AND AMUSEM1;NT. 
TkK.MS: 3.5 CENTS I'EIl .\NXLM IX .\I>VAN< K. 

Advertising Rates : 

One mouth, per line, - - - - 10 cents. I Six months, per line, - - - 40 cents*.- 

Three months, per line, - - - 25 " | One year, per line, . . . . tx) " 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. CIRCULATION NEARLY 0,000. 

A. FOiriVTAIIV, Publisher, Ifliddletowu. Conn. 



The Star. 



PUBI.ISHEI> AT TIFFIN, OHIO, 

IS AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, CONTAININ(i FORTY-EIGHT COLUMNS. 

It has a large circulation, which is constantly increasing, and advertisers will find it a valnal)k- 

advertasing medium. 

Advertising Rates : 

1 column, 1 year, $7;) 00 I 1-2 column, months, $!,>< 7."): :> months, - $14 00- 

1 column, G months, $;^7 50; ;{ months. - - 18 75 1-4 column, 1 year, is 7.> 

1-2 column, I year, ;i7 .'iO | 1-4 column, i; montlis. .fit (Hi; :imf.nths, - !i 00- 

Address all communications to ICI^.MIOR WIIITK, Tiflin. Ohio. 

The Southern Enterprise. 

(JREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA. 
*i. F. TO\^'lVES, Kditor. .IIVO. C. & Kinv. BAII.KA', Proprietors, 



o^'LY i'.ii'i:i; I'ViujsiTEn rx the city asp cocxty of aj!/:/:xi /l/.e. 

<'ash Atlvertlsenient* Inserted on Liiberal Terms. 

The Montcalm Herald. 

STAXTOiV, ItllCHItJAIV. 
ISSCKI> KVKRV WATITROAY, BY K. R. POWET.,!.., Editor and I'nbl 

THE ONLY PAPER AT THE COUNTY SEAT. 
Advertising Rates : 

1 inch spMce, or less, 1 wc(M<, - - .V) cents I 1-2 column, .'l mos., $12; (! nK)s., $20; I yr 
|;.h1i siibsciiuent week, for 2 months, 25 " |l column, .'i mos., 20; i; mos., .i'^i ; \ \■^ 
For each week al"t(M- two months, - 10 " Legal udvcrtisemenis at statute |)r"ic 

l-s column, .i mow., $5; (> mos., $8; 1 year, $12 Business Cards, ycirly, per line, - 
1-* column, ;{ mos., 8; (J mow., 12; 1 year, 20 | Special But;iiu'ss Notices, per line, - i 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 307 



UNRIVALED FACILITIES FOR JIOSLVESS MEX 



«;BEAT IIVDUCEMEaiTS TO ADVEBTISEBI* 



Gazette and Le Messager Canadien. 



ENGL^ISH A^l> FKEWCH. 



DeS" t'OMBI3iEl> CIRCl'LATIOA' IMMEXSE ! "^ffl 



lu drawing attention to tlie facilities offered for giving increased publicity to anj- busiuess 
or profession through the columns of my two newspapers— the Gazette and Le Wessagek 
Canadien, I would just say the Gazette is an old established weekly paper, and lias a large antl 
constantly increasing subscription list, thus presenting claims of a superior order on those who 
wish to bring their profession or business prominently before the wealthy mercantile and fann- 
ing community of the Eastern Townships of Canada. Le Messagek Canadien is a French weekly 
newspaper— is the official organ of the large and ijopulous District of Bedford— consequently 
has a very large circulation— and offers unrivaled facilities for advertisers to reach that nu- 
merous class of our inhabitants which can be reached in no other way, as it is found in almost 
every household; therefore, with a view of extending their usefulness the subscriber solicits a 
share of public Advertising patronage either for one or both of my journals ; Avith the assuranc*- 
that, should the public favor me with such it shall ever be my aim to further their interests an<l 
merit their contidence and esteem. All Advertisements translated either English into French, 
or French into English, fi-ee of charge, and will be neatly and prominently displayed in the 
columns of either or both my newspapers. 

Advertisers in replying will please state in which of my papers they wish their advertise- 
ments to appear, or in both, and address 

S. V, SMITH, Editor and Pioiiiietor of Cii-aiil>y fiiazette, 

altio of Le Message!- ('a»adieii. 



BATES OF AWVEBTISIWG. 

Biglit Cents p«r Hue, solid Bourgeois, for the fljtst insertion ; two cents per line for 
eacU subsequent insertion. 



308 



AMERICAN NEWSrAPER RATE-BOOK. 



ADVERTISERS WILL TAKE KOTICE ! 
THE >IOR.>i:VG -AEUS, 

I'UBLISIIEI) DAILY, 15V T. G. NICHOLS, i 
AT -231 AND -l.in MAIS ST., 
POFGHKEKPSIK, ISEW YORK. 

Has the largest circulation of anv daily paper 
on the Hudson Uiver. 
It is sold oil all the Hiidsoii liiver trains and 
boats, and is read by at least one thousand per- 
sons who pass daily to and from the metropolis. 

SPEIVCER JOURJVAl,. 

THE OXLV NEWSPAPER IN THE COUNTV, 

and the 

LARGEST COUNTV PAPER IX THE STATE. 

PUBLISHED AT TAYLOUSVILLE, KT. 

^y. T. BURTON', Editoi: and Proprietor. 
Terms of Advertising : 

1 sqr. (Minion), 1 w. $1 | 1 sqr. (Minion), Imo., $3 
1 column, 1 year, $100. 



^'Cheapest and Best Baptist Paper in the Union." 
THE BAPTIST VISITOR, 

PUBLISHED MiJNTHLY, AT DOVER, DEL. 
THOROUGHLY U.\PTISTIC. 

Revs. O. F. FLIPPO & J. L. LODGE, Editors. 

I.F. WEISHAMPLE, Jr., Baltimore, Editor. 

Terms .- 50 cts. a year, in advance. 

Advertising: 10 cts. a line for each insertion. 

Rev. O. F. FLIPPO, Dover. Del. 



PROTOTYPE 

(DAILY AND WEEKLY) 
Rook aud Job Priutiiig Establishmeut, 

DUNDAS Street [opp- City Hotel), 

LONDON, ONTARIO. 

Every kind of Cards, Circulars, Hand Bills. 

Tlie Prototype is the leading daily in the city, 
and has an extensive circulation. 

JOHN SIDDONS, Editor and Prop'r. 



BEL^VIDERE COURIER, 

CADWELL & TUTTLE, Puulishers, 

BELVIDERE, BOONE CO., ILL. 

Terms : $1 50 per aiuiiim, in advance. 

Ha.s the largest bona fide circulation of any 
paper in the county. 

All description of job work, Plain, Colored and 
Bronze, executed in the best manner. 



FlTL,TOX COr>TY I^EOGER, 

CANTON, ILLINOIS, 
S. V. THORNTON, Pi HLISHEK. 



Deiiioiratic in politics, and circulates widely 

in Fulton and adjoining counties. 

An excellent Advertising Itfediunt. 

KATES KEASONAHLK. 



<;Ex>rTR.\L, i-.>rio:v agricui^ti'rist 

AIVI» 
I»IISSOL'RI VALLEY FAR.IIER. 

JKitEMIAH BEHM, O.MAHA, NEBRASKA, 

EDITOR AND PUOl'RIETOK. 

Subscription: ^i per annum, in adrance. 

Advertising Rates : 



^r li 



d -20 



•ach insertion, onli- 
ne outside iiage and 
r, for each insertion. 



THE HE>IPSTEA1> IIVariRER, 

AN INDEPENDENT PAPER, 
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING, IN THE VIL- 
LAGE OF HEMPSTEAD, QUEENS CO., N. Y'. 
DANIEL CLARK, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR. 

Established Forty Years. 
Best Advertising Medium in Queens Co. 

Advertisements inserted for cash at moderate rates. 



H^IIVOVER ERA, 

E. H. ALLISON, HANOVER, INDIANA. 

TERM.S : $1 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. 

Advertising Rates : 

1 square of 10 lines, first insertion, 
1 " '• one month, 

Discounts made on a longer time. 
No Medical Advertisements Inserted 



1 00 
1 50 



IIVDIAIVA DEMOCRAT, 

INDIANA, PA. 

The only Democratic newspaper in the county 

of Indiana, which contains a population of 

over 40,000. Circulation 1,.500 copies. 

Subscription price: $2 per annum in advance. 

advertising rates LIBERAL. 

Special Notices, - - 10 cents per line. 

JOHN R. DONEHOO, Editor and Pub'r. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Agents. 



THE CO IV FEDERATE. 

A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER. 

Published every Thursdaj- morning, at 

MOUNT FOREST, in PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 

$1 OO Per .\nnunt. 

Advertisers will And this paper to be a good 
advertising medium. Advertising done at rea- 
sonable rates. Address Proprietor, or Geo. P. 
Rowell & Co., New York. 



Special Notices io cts. per lino. 



THE FAMILY CASKET. 

White Hdise, N. .1. $1 tMl a year, in advance. 
Ignores i)olitics, Imt sjieaks right out in me<-t- 
ing. Everybody is crazy after it. Has tlie en- 
dorsement of tlie Ipcstiiien and women of 
the day. Circulation l,0(Miat is months old (Oct. 
1, 18(i!»), and daily iiicreasiiiL' in almost every 
.State in the Union. The best advertising me- 
diuui ill the countrv. 1 sqr. .■)() cts. 1 insertion, 
$1 a month. i?Sii vear; I col. :?I0 (Irst insertion, 
$ir)a mo, $(iO a yi'ar. Other advirtiscmcnts at 
same rates. Contains mure oriL^inal matter 
than all Ave of the othei paixTs in the <(.uniy 
together. A. J.Shampanoie, Editor and I'roji'r. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 3()9 



Portland Advertiser, 

Foiiiidecl in 17H:i. 
THE OtiDEST jVEWSPAPEB I:V THE STATE OF MAIIVE. 



TER:IIS of SlTBSCRIPTlo:V: 
Oally Advertiser, - - > _ - $0 OO a year. 

WeeUly Advertiser, - - _ _ ^1 qq h 



THE :V00X E»ITIo:v of the Advektisek is designed chiefly for circulation on the lines 
of vailwiiy leading east and north of Portland, on which the mail trains leave at 1 o'clock, con- 
necting with the tram trom Boston and tlie West. The Advertiser contains eight hours later 
iiews than the Porthuul and Boston morning papers sent out on the same train— a special feature 
hemg the telegrapbic summary ot the special despatches to the New York papers of the same 
day, to which must be added the morning report from the New York Stock and Gold Boards. 
This edition is accordingly a useful medium for advertisers who wish to reach not only trav- 
elers by rail but subscribers as far east and north as the trains run in the afternoon. 

THE EVEIVIIVO EOITIOIV is issued at 5 o'clock, for circulation in the city and suburban 
towns reached by wa>' trams. It contains a summary of the news received by mail and all the 
despatches torwardi-<l to the Ass(5ciated Press. The circulation of this edition is largely among 
forehanded workmgmcii, who have no time to spare for a morning paper but have both the 
means and the inclination to read a daily paper after their day's work is done. 

All advertisements taken for the Daily Adverti.ser appear in both the Noon and Evening 
Editions. " 

ADVEBTISIIVG BATES: 

One square (12 nonpareil lines) three times, - - . - $1 00 

One square one week, - - - - . . . - 1 2.5 

One square each week's continuance, ..... 75 

One column one year, - - - . . . . - 400 00 

Special Notices and Amusements, one square three times, - - 1 50 

Special Notices one week, - - - - . . . . 2 00 



THE ■WEEKIiY EDITIOIV is designed for country readers, and contains a careful sum- 
mary of the news of the week, with the principal editorials and the most important communica- 
tions and news letters printed in the daily, with full market reports, prices current and stock 
lists, and Iresh selections of current literature. Its circulation is increasing in all parts of the 
State, and our purpose is rather to discourage than to seek advertising for its columns. For the 
present we have adopted the following 

A1>VERTISI1V« BATES s 

One square one week, - - - - - . . - $1 00 

One square each week's continuance, ...... 50 



H. W. BICHABDSO^V, Publisher, 

»5 Federal Street. Portland, :Waine. 



310 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Wabaunsee County Herald, 

TMK i{i;>T .\i)\ i;i;TisiN(i mkdilm in \\ksti:i;n Kansas. 

Cii-ciilntion 1,.>4>0. 
PFBIilSHEn WKKKLY. AT AI.MA, WABAIASEK €0.. KANSAS. 

Western Kansas is at the present time receiving a lai-ger immigration than any other portion 
of our country. Her broart prairies, rich and fertile valleys, her wooded stream,'* and genial 
climate are attracting hither the hardy sons of toil by thousands. Tlic co\inties oi Wabaunsee, 
Pottawatomie, Riley, Davis, Morris, Lyon, Osage, Shawnee and Jackson, con.stitiitc the veiy 
garden spot of tlic State. 

THE WABAl'IVSEE COFIVTV lIERAT.n 

CIRCULATES IN ALL THE ABOVE NAMED COUNTIES. AND ADVERTISERS WILL FIND 
IT .VN EXCELLENT MEDIUM FOR COMMUNICATION. 

Advertising Rates liiberal. .... Correspondence Solicited. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION : 

Single Copy, One Year. ...-.$•> OO 

Six Months, - - 1 OO 

Address 

SEELEKS «fc FAIBFIELM. 

On file at Geo. P. Rowell & Co.'S Advertising Agency, 40 Park Row, New York. 



The Jewish Times. 

A ^VEEKIiY JOrR^^AI.. 

(LARGE QUARTO, S I .\ T E E N PAGES.) 



Organ of tlie Progre-ssive Israelites, and Published in the Interest of Ci-i-ilizatio* 
and Enlightenment. 



Its extensive circulation among the best classes of Societj- all over the United States 
makes it the best Advertising Medium. 



Advertising Bates : 

One insertion, per line of Nonpareil .... .!.■> 

Thirteen insertions, per line of Nonpareil, ... $i i.") 

Twciitv-six " " " ... -2 10 

Fifty-two " " '• ... 4 00 

One column, per annum, - . . . . 40f) mi 
No advertisement inserted for less than ijtl .">it. 

M. EIiI>i:V«SEB, Editor, IVo. 7 Murray St., Room IVo. .%, Xew Yorlt. 

Can be found on (lie at (Jeo. P. Rowem- & Co.'S Advertising .\gcncy, N. Y. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



311 



IMorth-Western Journal of Commerce, 



Room 5, Vissclier's Block, Cor. l;8tli and Oon^las Sts., 



OMAHA, IVKBRASKA. 



THE OIVLiY OOMMERCIAr. IVEU'SPAPER n'EST OF fHICACVO. 



RATES OF SrBSC'RIPTIOX : 



(Per Annum, 
•Six Months, 



$2 50 I Delivered to Subscribers, per uiontli, 
1 ijO I Single Copies, 



PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY. 



IMPORTAIVT TO ADVERTISERS. 

The Journal of Commerce is mailed weekly, irrespective of regular subscriptiox, to all 
Merchants, Commission Houses and business men of Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, New 
Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Washington Territory, Sand- 
vncH Islands, China and Japan. It is tlie best Advertisine Medium iu tUe \^'est. The ad- 
vertising and subscription terms are cheaper than of all otlier papers published West of the 
Missouri river. Now is the time to send in yovir favors. 



RATES OF ADVEBTISIIVO! 



■insertions. 


Card. 


1 sqr. 2 sqrs. 1-8 col. 


1-6 col. 1-4 col. 


1-3 col. 


1-2 col. 


leol. 


1 week. 


$2 


$3 $5 $6 


$8 $9 


$12 


$15 


$•22 


2 weeks, 


3 


4 7 9 


12 15 


18 


21 


*{ 


3 weeks, 




(i 9 12 


15 17 


•22 


24 


39 


1 month, 




7 1(1 13 


16 19 




30 


45 


-2 months. 




11 17 ^22 


28 34 


41 


50 


75 


3 months. 




la 21 28 


36 42 


50 


67 


100 


6 months,. 


14 


•24 36 4-5 


.55 67 


80 


97 


1.50 


1 year, 


24 


.•i7 .5.5 70 
TERMS OF ADVERTISING, 


88 ia5 
PAYABLE IX ADV 


1.50 
ANCE. 


180 


2-25 



The Journal of Commerce is on file at the Agents' Office, Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 40 
^ark Row, who are duly authorized to solicit advertisements and subscription. 



JlJL.ItJS SIIiVERSMITH, Editor. 



312 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM i:V THE 'WEST. 

The Milwaukee See-Bote 

IS THE LEADINi; AND I,AK(ii;sT CIH( ILATIN(; (iKItMAN l'AI'KI{ IN WISCONSIN. 

THE ^VEEKr.Y SEE-BOTE CIRCULATES MOST GENEUALLY THKOUGHOUT WISCOXSlNr 
MINNESOTA, IOWA, MICHIGAN AND ILLINOIS. 

THe DAII.,Y SEE-BOTE tUroushout the City of Milwaukee and the State of ^Visconsih. 

ADVKUTI.SLNG AT REASONABLE RATES. 

The See-Bote can bo t"ouii<l on file at the Advertising Agency (if Gko. P. Rowell & Co., No. 
40 Park Row, New York, where contract.s for advertising may be nuule. 

P. V. I>EITSTEB, 9« Mason St., ^VUwauUee, Wis. 



The Monitor. 



M.\INT.\IX TIIK KI(;iIT.— KXPO.SE THK WKOXG. 

CHARr.E8 W. GEERS, Editor and Proprie<<»rv 

Pl^BLISHED AT DENTON, TEXAS, EVERY' SATURDAY MORNING, 

At $3 50 a Year (Currency). 

The MoxiTOK circulates extensively throughout the entire State of Texas. I^ circulation in 
the Great Wheat Region alone is over a thousand, and is an excellent advertising medium. 

Advertising Rates (Currency) : 
One column, one year, • - - $1.")U 1 Onc-tViurtli column, one year, • - $45 

One-half column, one year, - - 80 | Onc-sixtcentli column, one year, - i^ 

We receive no foreign advertisements for a Irss piridil than a year. No extra charge foi 
cuts or large type. Address C1IAKI>I':.S W. GEERS, Benton, Texas, 

Or Geo. P. Rowell & Co., New Y'ork, autliorizeii Agents. 

The Daily and Weekly Standard. 

PUBLISHED AT - • RALEUai, N. C , - - I'.Y M. S. LITTLEFIELD.- 

A POLITICAX. AXO FAMII>Y IVEWSPAPER. 

The Staxd.\I{i> is equaled by no paper in the State in the amount and variety of its rea<ling 
matter. The I>aily contains the latest news from all parts of the world, and gives a faithful' 
transcrii)t of tlic subjects of the dav. The Weekly contains twenty-fish* columns of Reurt- 
ins .Matter, on Political, .V^jricultural and Litcrarv subjects. Tlic A'«-ivs dcpartnx^nt con-- 
tains a lull suiuniary of all tlic interesting events i>V the week. II is a paper suited to every 
class ol reaflers, and is unccpialed as a K.v.MU.v I'.vi'Elc. The " Standard " is emphatically 
the People's Journiil. As an Advertising .Medium, it is the best in the State, having the 
I-AKGEST (iitc ri.AiiDN of anv papei- published in North Carolina. It has also the finest and most 
COnil)letc Job ollice and liookbinderv in tlic State. 

Rates of Subscription:— Daily paii<r, 1 year, $10; (J months, $(>; 1 month, $1. Weekly p«i- 
per, 1 year, $-2 .")ii: .1 eiijiies, 1 \-eai-, ^lo; |ii (■cii)ies, 1 year, $20. To those who get up clubs of five or 
more subscribers, une cdijy ;,M-at is will he luriiisbed. 

Rates of Advertising :— Ten lines oi one inch space to constitute a scpiai-e. One square, 
one insertion, .•?1 : each subse(|ueiit insertion, .'^lO cents. Liberal deductions by special contract 
to large advertisers. ( )llice (ui Favctteville .street, Raleigh, N. C. 



TIIK BEST AI»VKRTISI.X<; MKOII^M IX SOI'TII FI>ORII»A. 

The Florida Peninsular, 

PUBLISHED WKKKLY, .... AT I'AMPA, FLORIDA. 

It Y T II O M A S K . S P E I« C E R . 

Kstnblishcd in IN^tn. 

DKVO'I'KD TO TIIK INTERESTS OK SOUTH FLORIDA. 

The circulation ol the l'«iiliisular is nihinlv in the Soulhoru States, but has an increasing 
circulation in the North and North -West. Parties wishing to hear of the clinnite, resources, Ac, 
of Florida, should .sen<l for this paper. Remember that it is published in a section where all the 
TrojMcal Fruits are raised. Having a large circulation, it possesses unusual advantages to ad- 
vertisers. Business mi^i should give it a trial. 

Subscription, $2 KO Per Year. 
TERJI8 OF Al)VEKTI8IN(;: Per sfpiare, first insertion, .'ll.^O; each subwvpu'nt insertion, "."i cents. 

Refer to Geo. P. Roweei. & Co., .Vdveitisiug AgPn.tjt, 40 Park R<)w, Sew York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



313: 



OIVtT UIVIO^V IVEWSPAPEB ISf IVORTHER3V VIKGIIVIA. 



The Loudoun Republican^ 



PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT 



r.E£SBrRG, LOTJDOriV COriVTY, VA. 



By TV. S. McCOI.]L,ISTER, 



Editor and Proprietor. 



TERMS, m 00 PER ANNUM, PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 



Circulates extensively tlironghont I^oudouu, Fairfax, Alexandria, Clarke, Frederick, 

Fauquier, Prince TVilliam, Culpepper, &.c., <fcc., 

CHIEFtY AMONG THE QUAKERS OF THAT SECTION. 



ADVERTISING RATES i 



One week, 
Two weeks, 
Three weeks. 
One month, 
Two months, 
Three months, 
Six months, 
One year, - 



.50 


$1 00 


$150 


$2 00 


.75 


1 .50 


2 2.5 


3 00 


- 1 00 


2 00 


3 00 


4 00 


- 1 25 


2 50 


3 75 


6 00 


- 2 25 


4 00 


6 00 


8 00 


- 3 50 


5 00 


8 00 


10 00 


- 5 00 


8 00 


10 00 


12 00 


- 8 00 


12 00 


15 00 


20 00 



4 squares. 5 squares. 1-4 column. 1-2 col. 



$2 .50 
3 75 

5 00 

6 25 
10 00 
12 00 
15 00 
25 00 



$3 00 
4 50 
() 00 
8 00 
12 00 
15 00 
25 00 
35 00 



$5 00 
8 00 
11 00 
15 00 
20 00 
25 00 
35 00 
55 00 



Sixty-two words, or their equivalent in space, constitute one square. 



Icol. 

$8 00- 
12 00 
15 00 
20 00 
25 00 
35 00 
55 00 
100 00 



ADVERTISEMENTS CONTAINING CUTS, OR TYPE I.ARGER THAN PICA 
SIZE, FIFTY PER CENT, ADDITIONAL,. 



AGENTS.-GEO. P. ROWELL & CO. and S. M. PETTENGILL & CO. Advertisements from 
all others must be accompanied by the cash. 



:{14 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Brttei- Siiftaiiit-d nt Iluiiit- tUait any Journal of its Class in tlie fVest! 

The Salem Monitor 

IS ITMLISIIKI) KVKUV S.VTrin)AY 15V 
i». R. IIKXOKK.SO.X <fc \V. T. STi:i»l», l^ditors antl Proprietors. 

At #1 -J") per iiimnni in ii(lviiiK-c: (IcliNcrcd ti> snl)scril)ci-s in Saloui, by eari-icr, $1 M \^(•l■ annum. 
Kntex of Aclvfrtisiiig : 
One squiire, ten lines, one in.sertiou, $1; lor each additional insertion, M cents; one square, 
three months, $5; si.x months, $7; twelve months, $10; two squares, three months, $7; six 
months, $10; twelve months, $1(>; quarter column, one year, $45; half column, one year, $()0; one 
cDlumn, one year, $100. Transient advertising must be paid for in advance. 

West Philadelphia Star. 

.IX I.\I>KPKiVI>KXT FA^IILV PAPKK. 

DEVUTKI) to J.lTKKATllii;, L()( AI. AM) (iKNKKAL NKW.S, ScC, PHIXTKD AM) I'lUMSHEU AT 
IVo. :t.2«H> Market Street, ^Vest PliiladelpMn. 

Terms : One copy, $2 per annum in advance ; two copies, $3; eight copies, $10, and one to the 
getter-up of the club; singh; copies, five cents. 

Rates of Advertising^ : Half square, three months, $0; six months, $9; one square, three 
months, $1.5; six months, $10; one year. $.30. Ten lines solid nonpareil make a square. For ordi- 
iiarv advertising, ten cents per line is charged for a single insertion. 

CHAS. «;iTHE]\«. Kditor and Publisher. 
:t.20« Market St., n'est Pbilad. 

Wayne Democratic Press, 

t,YOBIS, IVi:^' YORIi. 

A WEEKLY XEW^Sl'APER, DEVOTKI) TO (iENEKAL NEWS. A(;UICl'LTUKE, POLITICS XSD 

THE ADVANCEMENT OF HOME INTERESTS. 

Rates of Advertisint; : 

1 in. 2 in. -tin. 1-4 c. l-'2 c. .3-4 c. 1 col. I 1 in. 2 in. 4 in. 1-4 c. 1-2 c. 3-4 c. 1 eol. 

1 week, $1 00 $1 ,50 $3 00 $6 00 $8 00 $10 00 $12 00 3 mos. $4 00 $(i 00 $10 00 $1.5 00 $2.5 00 $.30 00 $3,5 00 
-' " 150 2 2.5 4 00 7 00 1100 13 00 15 00 |(; " (i 00 9(H) hi 00 20 00 40 00 55 00 70 00 

3 '• 2 00 3 00 5 00 8 00 13 00 15 00 18 00 I it " 8 00 12 00 20 00 20 00 .55 00 70 00 85 00 

4 '• 2 25 3.50 00 00 15 00 17 0<J 20 00 | 12 " 10 00 K! IKI 24 (X) ;J2 00 G.5 00 85 00 100 00 

WM. VAJV CAMP, Pnblislier. 

Washington Democrat. 

A lAVi: I.OtAI. >i:WSPAP13R. 

I'l l',l.lSlli;i) \\ KEKLV AT 

SALEM, WASIIIJVGTOA- COITJVTY, HVKIAJVIA. 

OFFIC l.\L ORGAN OF THE COUNTY% CIRCULATES FREELY IN ONE OF THE 
LA K( JEST COUNTIES OF THE STATE, AND PRESENTS AN 
EXCELLENT MEDIUiM FOR ADVERTISERS. 
Address l>EMOCRAT, Salem, Indiana. 

The Ridgeway Press. 

LiEAOIXtii PAPER IX WARREX, FRAXKLIX AX1> <iRAXVIl,I.,E COHXTIES. 

THE PRESS IS A LARCJK THlin^TWO COLUMN PAPER. AND HAS A LIBERAL CIRCU- 
LATION IN si;\ i;itAL (OCNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Itiiti-s of Advertising : 

1 square, three montlis, .... $5 oo I 1-2 column, three months, - - - - $,^5 00 
1-4 column, three months, - - - . 15 00 | 1 column, three months, .... .-,000 
A discount on all contracts over $50. Tkkms Cash. Addi-ess, 

TIIOS. M. IirOHES, Publisher. Ridgeway, X. V. 

The Vermont Herald. 

A W E E K T. Y R E P IT R T. If A X X E W S P A P E R . 

Pl'lJLISIIKI) EVERY Tl'LSDAV, RV 
E. C. BEXIVETT, - . . . VERMOXT, FULTOX COIiXTY, ir,£.IXOIS. 

ADVEKTiHiNci Rates: 

4 )nc inch, or less, one insertion, - $ 1 00 , Two inches, one year, - - - - $15 00 

three insertions, - - - 2 00 | Three inches, one year, - - 18 00 

two months, - - - - 3 ,50 i Si.x iiu-hes, one year, .... •i'i OO 

three months, .... 4 .50 Half colunin, oiie vear, • - 45 00 

on(' year, lO(R) | One column, one vear, - . . . 7,'-, oO 

Address PI'lti.ISiiER OF 'lIERAL.I>, Vermont, 111. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 313 



Hot Springs^ Ark.^ Courier. 



PrBIilSIIKD AT THK FAR-FAMEI> ARKANSAS HOT SPRIIVOS. 



CIRCULATES OX ALL THE RAILROADS AND STEAMBOATS, AND CAN BE HAD 
AT THE NEWS STANDS. 



SUBSCRIPTIOIV, - - - - - - $3 OO PER AIVIVUM. 



TO ADVERTISERS. 



The following correspondence will speak for itself. Read it, and profit by it. 

Hot Springs, Ark., June 30, 1869. 
Jas. D. Houston, Esq., Editor Courier— /Jea?- Sir.— Your note of the 28th, asking me to 
state the extent of circulation of the Hot Springs Courier newspaper has been received. I 
state what I know, personally. The Courier has a good local circulation, and it already 
circulates over a greater part of the State of Arkansas. There is not a State, city or town of 
any magnitude in the United States but that it reaches— embracing the Indian Nation, Utah, 
California, and the Golden Coast of the Paciflc. As to the number issued, I cannot state, 
but I have been forced to make requisition for additional mail bags, caused by the extent 
of its circulation. With no desire to mislead any one, I do not hesitate to say that as an 
advertising medium, it is invaluable. 

I am, very respectfully, 

w. A. ]m:oore, 

Post Master, Hot Springs. 



AI>VERTISIIVG RATES: 

One Column, One Year, .---_- $aoO OO 

One Colrnnn, Six Months, _ - - _ _ las OO 

Hair Column, One Tear, ---_.- 135 OO 

Half Column, Six Months. - - - - - OO OO 

Address JAMES I>. HOUSTON. Hot Springs. Arkansas. 



316 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



CHICAGO 

Home Circle and Temperance Oracle. 

VOLV.MK lO.— OXK UOr.I.AU A TKAR. 

SIXTEEN-PAGE MO N T H L V . — B E S 1" HOOK PAPER FOR BINDING. 
11,000 CIK< ILATIOJV, 

AMONG THE BEST CLASSES OF LITERARY PEOPLE AND TE.MPERANCE BUSINESS MEN. 
THROUGHOUT THE WESTERN STATES. 

An Unusually Ciiood Medium for Advertising among the Ladie.s. 



Rates of Advertising : 

One square, one time, - - - $-2 00 I Half column, 8 squares, 12 months, j>90 OO 

each additional insertion, 1 50 One " 16 " 6 " 80 OO 

Halfcolumn, 8 squares, 6 months, 50 00 | One " 1<! " 12 " 140 00. 

S. M. KENiVEDY, Proprietor, 

1»4 Clark Street, Ctilcago, niiuois. 

ADVERTISE ! ADVERTISE ! I ADVERTISE I ! I 

IN THK 

Cazenovia Republican^ 

PUBLISHED AT CAZENOVIA, .MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK, 

BY IRWIIV A. FORTE. 

Try it ! Try it ! ! Try it ! ! t 

The RErLiJi-iCA.v circulates in three counties: 

MADISON, O N O N I) A t; .\ .\ N D C II E N A N G O . 

Circulation Over 1,«00. 

THE PROOF THAT AIJVERTISI.XW « PAYS" IS TO ADVERTISE. 



We give our rates below. No deduction. We prefer to have our paper half filled with pav- 
ing advertisements than to have it full of half-price ones. We claim one of the " cleanest" sub- 
scription lists in the State. Send for a copy of paper. 

Ratt'H of .Vdvertising 1 

1 w. 2 w. .'! w. I m. :{ m. 1; m. 1 vr. I 1 w. 2 w. :i\v. 1 ni. :im. dm. 1 jt. 

1 square, $1 00 $1 .50 $1 75 $2 00 $4 00 ^n 00 $i(i mi | 1-2 col., $« 00 $8 00 Jiio 00 $12 00 $20 00 ■f.-.m sji.'Wioo 

2 " 2(K) 2.'iO ;{00 :{50 00 8 00 15 00 11 ■' 10 00 12 00 14 (K) Ui 00 ilO OO 55 100 <X1 
1-4 col., 4 00 5 00 GOO 7 00 12 00 18 00 :U) 00 1 A S(iuarc is one inch in length. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 317 



The Scandinavian Printing Company, 

FOR THE STATE OF MINNESOTA, PUBLISH THE FOLLOWING PAPERS : 

THE IVORDISK FOt,KEBi:,A», 

A Weekly Scaiiclinavian IVewspaper in the JVorwesiaii-DaiiisH r,angua^e, 

PUBLISHED AT 

MIIVIVEAPOliIS, MIIVIVESOTA. 

THE WIDEST CIRCULATION OF ANY PAPER IN THE STATE. 

Rates of Advertising : 

One inch of space, one week, - - - $1 00 I One inch of space, six months, - - - f 9 00 

" onemontli, - - 3 00 " " one year, - - - .,1^ 00 

" «' three months, - - 6 00 | One column (27 inches) lor one year, - 300 00 



THE MIIVJVESOTA TII>:VIIVG, 

A WEEKLY SCANDINAVIAN NEWSPAPER IN THE SWEDISH LANGUAGE, 
Published at St. Paul, Minnesota. 

THE ONLY SWEDISH PAPER WEST OF CHICAGO, AND HAS AN EXTENSIVE CIRCULATION. 



Rates of Advertising i 

- $1 00 1 One inch ol 
.iny.i>i» - - 3 00 " 

tliree months, - - 5 00 | One column (24 inches) for one year, - $250 00 



One inch of space, one weelt, - - - $1 00 1 One inch of space, six months, - - $8 00 
one month, - - - 3 00 " ". one year, - - l"^ 00 



THE FARMERTIDEIVDE, 

A MONTHLY SCANDINAVIAN AGRICULTURAL PAPER. 
THE ONLY ONE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Rates of Advertising i 

One inch, one month, $2 00; three months, $5 00; six months, $8 00; one year, $12 00 
Each additional, 1 00; three months, 2 50; six months, 5 00; one year, 9 00 

One column (12 inches), three months, 30 00; six months, 55 00; one year, 100 00 

.\s at least one-fifth of the population of the State of Minnesota is Scandinavian, advertisers 
rill easily see that it is to their interest to advertise in the above papers. 

Address 

THE SCA]\1>II\AVIAIV PRIIVTIIVG COMPAJXY, 

Minneapolis or St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Or, to Geo. P. Row ell & Co., our Authorized Agents, 40 Park Row, New York. 



318 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BUOK. 



Nebraska State Journal^ 

LI.\« OLA, AKBllASKA, 

OFFK lAl. I'.VPEIl OF STATE AM) COINTV. 

^Veekly at $2 a Year. 

RADICAL IX POLITICS, AND RADICAL IN DEVOTION TO THE INTERESTS OF 

AGRICULTURE, MECHANICS. ARTS AND TRADE. 

STARTING WITH THE NEW CAPITAL TWO YEARS AGO, IT HAS A SUBSCRIPTION LIST 

THE LARGEST BUT ONE IN THE .STATE. 

Rates of Advertisiug : 

1 square, one iiusei-tion) $1 ■')•): one mouth, $2 .'>() I 1-4 column, one year, $4.") 00 

4 squares, one month, 1 -iril 1-2 column, one year, - . -7.") 00 

1-4 column, one month, 12 0() | 1 column, one year, \-i:< m 

<;KRK &, BKOWA'LKK, PublisUers, Lincoln, Xebiaska. 

>• i.MHSPiiXSAiJLi: TO Tin: < I rizK:v axo thk i3i>ii<iRA:vT." 

Pleasant Hill Leader. 

The town of Plea.sant Hill, Mi8.souri, now a little over three years ol age, already has about ri.^m\- 

inhabitants, and is growing rapidly. 

THE LE^iDER IS THE OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE CITV. 

It has much the largest circulation of any paper which circulates in the city or vicinity. 

It labors specially for the promotion of local advancement. 

As its columns attest, it is eagerly sought as an advertising medium by local business men. 

Rates of Advertising : 
One square, one insertion, - - - .fl 00 I One column, 1 month, $1.t; 1 jear, - -$100 0(V 
Each additional insertion, - - - - ,")0 | Local Notices, per line, one insertion, - 20 

One square, one month, $3; one year, - 10 ihi I ■■ •' one month, - l."> 

One-fourth column, 1 month, $.">; 1 year, - .to (MJ • •• one year, - - 0."> 

One-half column, 1 month, $7. tO; 1 year, (W 00 | Administrator's Notices, each, - - - .) M 
Addiess CHAS. W. B0WMA:V, Editor and Publisher, 

Pleasant Hill, Missouri. 



Light for the World. 

Testiimonial.— Cle\i;l\m>, Fcl)niar.\-, ls(;;).— \\'c lia\c had frequc'nt opportunities of com- 
paring the Petroleum Flnid of .Mr. Daiil'ortli'.s witli nlhcr Burning Fluids in use, and consider 
it unrivalled in safety and in the beauty and lirilliuncy of its liglit. 

, 1). II. BECKWITII, M. D., G. W. BARNES, M. D., J. C. SANDERS, 31. 1)., 

[bIGNEDj y SCHNEIDER, M. D., H. F. BIGGAR. M. D. 

What the Press says of it. 
"The cheapest and safest light." — Cleveland \ "Cannot be e.xi)loded by any known test." — 
JjCader Ch'veliinil Herald. 

" Safest and best light, withal tlic clicapest."— I "The wonder of ilic iiincti'.iith century."— 
Cleveland Plain Dealer. I OIno Wiekly ncrieir. 

"Werecommend ittoour readers."— (/('?•»)««/(/. "AVeuseit in preference to all other lights." 
"A wonderful light, surprisingly cheap."— | —G'o/iVm /to'/Vic. 
Greenville Argus. I " A beautiful light."— 0/iio Farmer. 

" A moat excellent light."— Cleveland Ere. News. \ " Beautiful, safe and cheap light."— 7ij/^'rt/o Kxp . 
R. V. 1>A;VF0RTII, Proprietor and Manufacturer of Petroleum Fluid. 
Principal olUce, 71 Public S.iuare, ( :iev<land, Ohio. 

The Allegan Co. Record. 

SPICIKST LOCAL, PAPIOR I.^ SOIITII-WICKTKRIV MICIIKJAIV. 

Circulates in every household, olllce, bank, store, sliop, post oltlce, lu'wsroom or manufacluriny: 

estwblislnnent in .\)legan and neighb<»ring counties. First paper calle<l lor wluMi local 

information is desired. Ni?w sub!5eril)ers every (hi.\- ! 

Advertising Rates > 

1 w. 2 w. ."{ w. 1 mo. 2 mo. .{in.l I w. 2 w. .1 w. 1 mo. 2 mo. :! m. 

1 square, f 1 50 $2 00 $2 .50 »:$ 00 $5 00 $0 00 4 S(iu'rs, $:i 7.i *4 26 *4 75 $5 25 sf.S 00 $!t 00 

2 scpi'rs, 2 50 2 75 3 25 4 00 (i 00 7 00 | 1-4 eol'n, 4 ."iO 5 00 .I .50 (JOG il OO 10 (K) 

All contracts for advertisi'inenls are due, and i)ayal)le in cash, at tijne of first insertion. 

Business Notices, ten cents iK^r line. Cards in Business Directory. ^5 per year. Additional 
liercentuge will bo charged for extra disi)lay in advertising. All money paid this institution is 
"•uarantoed to pass directly back into the hands of its cu.stomers in tlie ordinary transactions ol 
business. Address " RliCORl* PRI.\TIIV<i COMPANY," 

Otsego, Alleff^an Co., Nieh. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 31» 



Richmond Whig. 

EsTAiii,i!<iii;i) .Jan., I8ii. 
THE I..4.ROEST T>AIT.Y PAPER PrBI.ISHEI> IX VIRCilMIA. 

Onily, *»emi-^Ve«-kly and Weekly. 



The Wliig fii-culiitcs more generally through Virginia than any other newspaper, and has also 
a large circulation in West Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. 

Being one of the oldest journals in the State, and a recognized organ of the Agricultural 
Mercantile and Industrial interests of this section, it presents to advertisers an 

r:vsrRPAssEi» meihtjm or co>imi Ait atio.x 

WITH FARMKllS, .AiEllCHAXTS, MANUFACTrUKUS, AND ALL OTIIKli.S KXGAUED IN 
SUJISTANTIAL P.rslNKSs PLKSt JT.S. 



ADVERTISIiVtt RATES i 

Daily Issue. 

One square, 1 time, . . . .7.5 1 One square, 6 times, . . . $2 2.5 



3 " . . . 1 50 



$1 25 " " 2 weeks, . . 4 00 



6 00 



., „ i " ■ ■ 1 75 I '• •' 1 month, 8 00 

•^ • • . 2 00| " •' 3 " . . .20 00 

Longer advertisements, or any for a greater length of time, in proportion. 
Three times a week-75 cts. per square for the first insertion and 40 cts. for each continuance. 
Twice a week— 75 cents for the first and 50 cents for each continuance. 
Once'a'^:I^-7"e=!;n's*ea%7t'^2fe.'^^^ ^^'^ '""*'' "' ^^"*'^' '''"'' '^ cents for each continuance. 

Weekly Issue — One square 75 cents each time. 
as ^""as'thTdaii"'^^^^'^ advertisements will be taken for the senii-weckly and weekly issues 

Bishop Notices 15 cents per line each time, unless the continuance is arranged for. 
Enquiries promptly answered. 

SUBSCRIPTIO:V ! 

Rielnnond Daily ^Vliig. 

^"« y^^y-. if8 00 1 Three months $2 00 

Six months, .... 4 00 1 One month, . . . . * 75 

Ricliiuoiid Whig and Advertiser : 

n,.„ ^^o,. '^''''"" ^^eeUy— Every Tuesday and Friday.— One. year, $5 00. 

ci"°J^5i{ *5 '» I Three months, " . . . . *l 25 



oi^^X A ■ • • • . *.o w inree mont 
Six months 2 ,50 | One month, 

Riclimoud Weekly Wliig : 

., Every Wednesday. 

One year #2 00 I Three 'months .50c. 

MX month.s, I 00 I One month, 2.5c. 



JttOSEtT <fc SHIELDS, Publishers. 

RicliMioiid, Virginia. 

<.Eo. P. RowELL & Co., 40 Park Row, New York, Agents. 



320 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Pulaski Citizen. 



F. O. McCORD <fc CO., Piiblisliers. - F. O. McCoiiU, J. H. KlUK, L. D. McCoRD. 

A LARGE THIitTV-TWO-COLUMX LITERAKY AND FAMILY NEWSPAPER. 
The only paper published in Giles County, with an extensive circulation in Middle Tennes- 
see and North Alabama. Official advertiser "for the Fourth Congressional District of Tennessee. 

Terms of Advertising : 
$•2 per sqr. (10 lines or loss, in this typo), for tlie first, and rM cents for each subsequent Insertion. 

1 S(}. 1 mo., $:i .')0; 3 mos., $s ; i; mo., $11 ; 1 yr, $1.") j 14 col. 1 mo., $Vi; 3 mo., $20; (imo., S2.j; 1 yr.,$40 

2 sc|. 1 mo., $1); :j mo., $11 : <i mo., $1.'); 1 vr., $20 1-2 col. 1 mo., $20; 3mo., $30; (imo., 40; 1 vr., $55 
i sq. 1 mo., $10: 3 mo., $ls; li mo., $■>:>: 1 vr., $3() | 1 col. 1 mo., $25; 3 mo., $:J5: G mo., $50; 1 yr., $90 



Wareham News. 



OFFKK l.\' MlDI>Li:BOUOr<;H. 

.\ purely local paper, dovoted principally to the local interest of tlio town of Wareham and 
vicinity, and to the general news of Plymouth County. 
Rates of Advertising : 
1 square, 12 lines this type, one time, - $1 I 1-4 column 3 mos., $10; 6 mos., $15; 12 mos., $27 
E.ich subsequent insertion, - - - .25 1-2 column 3 mos., $20; (i mos., $30; 12 mos., $55 

1 square 3 months, $3; (i months, $5; 12 mos., $9 | 1 column 3 mos., $15; 6 mos., $.55; 12 mos., $100 
Special Noticks, 10 per cent, advance on the above PMited bv a Wareham citizen and pub- 
lished by JA'IIES M. COO.WBS, Itfiddleboro', Mass. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., New York Agents. 



'^SOMETHING IN THE STAR FOR EVERYBODY." 

Star in the West. 

ESTABLISHEI> 1827. ..... EXIL,ARGEI> 1870. 

A family newspaper, 8 pages, and published weekly by the Westekn Uxiversalist Book 
AND Paper Estallishment, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Edited by Rev. I. D. WILLIAM.'^OX, D.D., and .T. S. CANTWELL, with a competent corps of 
assistants. $2 5<> pn yi'in- in advance. Well and favorably known throughout the Mississippi 
Valley A capital lueilium for Advertisers who wish to reach thousands who take no other 
paper. Terms LiiiEiiAi. to good AD\Ei{risi;i!S. Address, 

WltiLIAMSOlV & CAIVTWElit,, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



The Idaho Statesman. 

TRI-WEEKI.Y AIVD WEEKLY. 

Published at Boise City, the capital and business centre of the Territory. Is the largest, oldest 
and cheapest paper, and the best Advertising Medium in Idaho Territorj-^. Established in 1864. 

Rates of Advertising : 
1 inch to 3 inches. Weekly, $1 per inch per mo. I Over 3 inches, Weekly, 75 cts. Inch per month 

1 " "3 " Tri-Weekly, $1.50 " per month " " " Tri- Weekly, $1 25 ' 

1 " "3 " in both issues, $2 50 per month I " " " in both, $1 ,50 " " 

In special notice column 25 per cent, additional. In reading columns, second or third pages. 50 

per cent, additional. J.IS. S. REYA'OLl>!!i, Proprietor. 

ESTA«I.ISIIKT> I.T INl.->. 

Repository and Republican. 

<a:vtox. OHIO. 

A greater numltor of Harvesting Machines are mad(> in Canton, the countv scat of Slnrk 
county, than in any other single iinint in the woiid. The statistics of Ohio show Stark comity 
to be first in Mineral, and third in .Vgricultural iiroducts, and fltth in poi)ulation in the State. 
Circulation ei|nal to an>- weekly pajx'i- in Ohio. Rates ok .Vdvehtisino : Per inch, single inser- 
tion, $1; one month, $2 5il; three months. $.">; si.\ months, $S; twelve months, $12. Local Notices 
2.') cents jK-r line. No deviation from these rates. 

II.VKTZEI.I. &. S.VXTOIV. (nnton. Ohiu. 



The Times. 



PUBLISHED AT M()N( TON, I'ROVINCK OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Subscription Terms : $1 25 a year In advance. 

Advertising Rates: For short iicriods, jier square, 1 imdi, (irst insertion, 75 cts.: each subso- 

<|ue!it week, J.-)cts. Vearlv iidveil isenients, $.■> jiei' inch: half vearlv. $3. 

Tho Times has a nineli lar^'.M- eireulat ion than any o! her iiaprr in Kastorn New Hrtinswick. 

and as an AdviTlisiiig M<'diiim lias no superior aiuonLT I'rovineial \\»'eklies. Monclon, the 

place of j)uhlicat ion, is the central town of the Lower Provinces of the l)omini(ni of Canada 

and thiMJrand Junction of the great Intercolonial Railway with the Maritime Province linos. 

It has already a large trade;, and is a growing and prosperous town. The Times is on Hie at 

4 . |-,o. P. RowKEL & Co.'S, Advertising Agenta. H. TIIAD. STEVEIVS, Editor and Prop'r. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Colt's Scientific Advertiser. 



jS. S. COLiT, -.---- Kditor and PublUliier. 



51 WortU Pearl Street, 



AL-BAJST, ----- WE^V YORK. 



-THIE CHEAPEST AIVD BEST ADVEKTISIlVCi MEDIUM IX EASTERN AHW 
CENTRAX. IVEW YORK. 



!l9 received and read In nearly every family and place of business in Albany and Troy, and bos 

a large circulation among tlie farmers, and in every town and village within 

thirty mUes of Albany and Troy. 

Is a Forty-Eij^ht-Colnmu Paper, Issued Monthly at Fifty Cents Per Auniuu. 

IS WELL PltlNTKD ON IIKAVV WHITE PAPER. 

We claim as the peculiar features by which the Scientiflc Advertiser has attained its popu- 
larity: Its original literai-j' character; a genuine Letter from Abroad in each number; its spicy 
Editorial Notices for Advertisers, which are in themselves of interest to the public; its method 
of placing from one-half to two-thirds reading matter on everj' page, thus rendering each page 
of equal value to advertisers; its steady exclusion of humbugs and advertisements of articles of 
doubtful merit; the publicity which is ensured by Iceeping flies of the Advertiser, nicely bound 
in green and gilt, in the prominent Hotels in Albany and Troj' aud vicinity, and in the traveling 
■season on all the boats running between Albany and New York. 



Advertising Rates t 

Xo smaller type than Agate used. 

Ordinarj' advertising, 15 cents per line; advertising, which includes free of extra charge, one 
.or more good notices, written by the editor, set in bourgeois type and inserted iis reading mat- 
£er, 30 cent* per line ; discount to yearly advertisers. 

Further inlormatiou or speciinou coi)ies furnished with pleasure. 



322 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



THE CHESTERFIELD DEMOCRAT. 

Published weekly in the town of 
ClIEKAW, S. C, 

At the head of navigation on the Pee Dee 
River, and the teiminus of the Cheraw 
and Darlington Uailioad. 
Has an extensive circulation and is an ex- 
cellent advertising medium. It is the only pa- 
per in Cheraw or the District of Chestei-flold. 



CORYDO:V REPrnEICAIi, 

AD^UIS & SELF, Publishers, Coodon, Inil. 

Has a weekly circulation of 700 in three rich> 
and growing counties of Southern Indiana. 

Advertisiiig Rates : 

1 column 1 year, $70 I 1 column (i nios., $U> 

1-2 •• 1 •■ 40 1-i " " 32 

1-4 " 1 " iio)l-4 " « •' 12 

And so on for less space and le^s time. 



COVIi'VGTOiA' JOrRIVAJL. 

Published at 

Covington, Fountain Co., Isd. 

The heart of the Indiana "Block Coal" 

regions. 

Advertisements (except those of the "Buchu 
class") inserted at reasonable rates. 



THE McMi:V:VVIt,EE EjVTERPRISE. 

A Repnblican Weekly 2\eicspaper. 

PUBLISHED AT JIcMINNVILLE, TENN. 

Official paper for Warren Co. 

Price S3 per annum. 

Circulates in the State of Tennessee, Missis- 
sippi, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana, 
Illinois, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New 
York and Maryland. 



ROCHFORD «AZETTE. 

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, AT 

RocKFOiUi, Winnebago Co., 111. 

ABIOMIAM E. SMITH, Editor and Proprietor. 

Circulation {bona fide), 3,000 copies weekly. 
The best advertising medium in Sorthfrn Illinois. 

Adverti.siug Rates: 
I column 1 year, ifl'.io I 1 colunmO mos., §70 00 
1-2 " 1 •• 7o I 1-2 " " to 00 

A column is '20 inches long. Less time in same 
proportion. JSi^ We shomd be pleased to re- 
ceive your orders for advertising. 



CORYDOIV DEMOCRAT. 

The largest paper published in the county. 

Triple the circulation of any other 

paper in the county. 

Largely Ciucllateo in IIakkison, CiiAwroKD, 

Washington and Floyd Counties of Ind. 

Rates of Advertising: 

Legal atlvcrtisements, $1 50 per square. Year- 
ly advertising at $S0 per column. 

A. W. BREWSTER, Publisher, 

Corydon, Han-ison Co., Ind. 

IIAWKINSVILLE DISPATCH. 

Published by Denls W. I). Boully, at Ilaw- 
kinsville, Pulaski county, Ga., at only $2 a 
year, in advance. Ailvcitising rates reasona- 
ble. Circulates in live couutirM adjoining, in 
which there is no other jjuper. Geo. P. 
KOWELL& Co. are our New York Agents. 
Advertising Rates : 
1 nio. ;f mos. mos. I'Z mos. 
1 square, $:i $7 $'J $15 

1-4 column, 10 -20 aS 45 

1-2 " 15 ao (iO 75 

1 " 20 40 75 1-25 



THE HART CO. MESSENGER. 

J. T. King, J. J. Fields, 

Louisville, Ky. Cavenui, Ky. 

F1P:LDS & KING, Proprietors. 

A Democratic 'Weekly. PnbllMhed at Ca- 
verna, Hart Vo,, Ky. 

Has a circulation of 3,000, and is one of the 
very best country advertising mediums in the 
bttito. Advertising rates moilerale. 

Specimen copiet furnishtd on appluuUion. 



THE GREAT FAEES JOIRNAE. 

Published Weekly by 
EDWIN FERNALD, Great Falls, N. II. 
Terms— $1 25 per annum in advance. 
Rates of Advertising.— $1 per inch for one 
week; 25 cte. per week after the tirst week. Per 
inch lor3 mos., $3; mos., $4; 1 year, $0. Read- 
ing Notices 15 cts. per line each inseriion. 

No attention paid to advertisemente from 
unknown parties, ualess accompanied by the 
cash in advance. 



"THE E01«G ROEE," 

TiTUSVILLE. 

I'uhlithed by Pennsylvania .SoMiers' Orphans. 

Terms— $3 per annum. 

ADVERTISING RATES: 
Ten cents per line each insertion; but no' 
advertisement taken for less than 50 cents. 
Business Notices 15 cents per line; Local No- 
tices 20 cents. Payment in advance. 



OTTAWA COlJiVTY AEWS, 

Port Clinton, Ohio. 
OFFICIAL PAPER OF TOWN AND COUNTY 

}'ublished in the (/rape regions of Lake Erie. 
A counti-y paper and makes country charges 
for advertising. Circulation '.(00. 

GEO. R. CLARK, I'nblisher. 



HAJ»IIETOaf COrJSTY REGISTER. 

Published at Noblesville Ind. 

Population of County, 25,000; of Town, 2,500. 

Ciixulatlou nearly 1,000. 

The only paper in the County. Un equaled 
among country papers as an ad- 
vertising medium. 
Geo. p. Rowell & Co., Advertising Agents. 

A. M. CONIiLIN, Proprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 332 

American Artisan. 

WEEKLY JOURi\AL, I>EVOTEI> TO THE lIVTEKESTiS OF MECHAWICS^ 
WAarUFACTURERS AjV1> UVVE^VTORS. 



The American Artisan is the only weekly journal In the United States devoted exclusively 
to Engraving, Mechanical and Manufacturing Subjects and Inventions. It contains numerous 
Original Engkavings and descriptions of New Machineky; Notices of all the Latest Dis- 
coveries; Instructions in Arts and Trades; Reliable Recipes, for use in the Field, the Work- 
shop, and the Household; and Practical Rules for Mechanics; Descriptions of Remarkable 
Inventions recently patented in the United States and Europe ; the whole forming an Encyclo- 
pedia OF General Information on Topics connected with the Industrial Arts, Progress of 
Invention, etc. 

Each number of the American Artisan contains sixteen pages of instnictive and interesting- 
reading matter, in which the progress of the Arts and Sciences is recorded in familiar language, 
divested of dry technicalities and abstruse words and phrases. In this journal is published 
regularly the Official List of all J'atents issued weekly from the United States Patent Office. 
Twenty-six numbers malce a half-yearly volume of handsome and convenient size. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRFPTIOIV « 

Two Dollars per Annum, or One Dollar for Six Months, less than four cents per copy weekly, 

and to Clubs at the following reduced rates: 

5 Copies for one year, - ■ ■ $S OO 

lO ' " - 15 00 

5 " six months, - - - 4 GO 

ID . « . -8 00 



RATES OF ADVERTISIIVO s 

INSIDK, - - - - 20 cents per line of 8 words each insertion. 

Outside, - - - - so " " of 8 " " 

A liberal discount made to yearly Advertisers. 

Cuts and displayed advertisements i-eckoned at the rate of U lines to the inch. 

NO extra charge for insertion of cuts. 

SPECIMEN COPIES OF THE " AMERICAN ARTISAN " SENT FREE. 

Address 

BROWN, COOMBS & CO., 
Publlslierg of tlie '^ American Artisan," ISO Broadway, N. Y. 



334 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Westliche Tribuene. 

SCHURMAJVIV & MILLEK, Pitblishero. EI>. IIAUKx^, G. SCHrRMAI^X, Editors. 

G. 8CHrR.'»IAIV:V, Manaj^er. 

KANSAS CITY. MISSOUKI, 



The above German Newspaper is the largest (in size) issued weekly, ami has the greaK-st circu- 
lation of any Journal published west of St. Louis. 



IT IS AN EXCELLENT ADVERTISING MEDIUM, BEING ABLY EDITED, 

AND IS AT PKESENT 

THE PAPER OF THE WESTER:* STATES. 

Tlie only IVewspaper Publi>ilie«l in r.lnroln County— Population 37,800. 

The Seaside Oracle, 

so ItKAIiy STREET, - - . WISCASSET, MAINE. 

" The handsomest paper printed in the State." The organ of no party, the advocate of no sect. 

liOCAI^ IVEWS A SPECIAr,T¥. 

Kxtcnsively circulated and thoroughly read. I There is no way of reaching so large a nuni- 
Largely original and of general interest. The ber of i-eaders in this vicinity, as through tl»« 
space devoted to advertisements is limited. columns of the Oracle. 



" Oursels as ithcrs see uh :" 

" Remarkably nca.t."—^ fail, Waterrille. Me.. " Very attnitt ive. "—/•>?<! Vress, Rockland. Me. "A 
perfect little beauty."— .S^ar, Allegan, Mich. "Nicc'lv i)iiiilf(i."— y^mertca/i Sentinel. Jiath, Me. 
" Printed neat as a book."— f'nioH, MdcJiia.i, Me. " A lively litth' nhvvt. "—Advertiiser, Levi.iton, Me. 
" E.'Cc(M'<liMgly neatly ]iT\ntotl.''—/!<-j>uhlic<in, MachiaJi, ^fv. " Kxcollent advertising nic^liuin "— 
Senthirl. Kdstiinrt, Me. " .Vblc and neatly in-inted."—7'raf/f AV/),.i/,r, Ohvv/,), .V. }'. •• .\n excell.'nt 
advertising u\>a\mn."~.imericaii. Elhimrth, Me, "One of the neatest and best printed papers to 
be found in the c juntry."— .Imtricvju. /tttfiili), X. Y. " Very neat, devoted to the news of the town 
and general good literature."— 7?er("i7/<', Hartford, Conn. ''We are convinced of the truth of tl>e 
old saw that the best goods are put up in the smallest parcels."— Co«rt«r, Charleston, S. C. 

Advertising Rates i 

Twenty cents per line for first insertion; l."> cent.s per line for each subHCfiuent insertion. 
.Ml a<lverti3oment« to be paid for in advanc^^. 

SPECIMKS COPIES SESr FREE. 

JOSEPH n'OOI>, Editor and Proprietor. 

Can be found on file at Geo. r. Kowki.i, & Co.'s Advertising Agency, New York. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 32^ 



Thompson's Monthly. 



34 and iHi 'Miln Street, one Block 8oiitli of Saiifoid Aveunc, 



BUIIXiKWATKB, COi^IV. 



TF.RM^ m (K) PER YEAR IX ADVANCE. - - - . SINGLE COPIES TEN CEN'tiS. 



r. B. THOMPSO::*, Editor and Pi-oprietor. 



BS- $50,000 I :* G B E E :v B A C K S I "^a 



RETUKNAllLE TO THK I'ATUONS OF 



T H O M P S O ]V ' S I»I O > T H r. Y . 



IN SUMS FKOM 



KF- «! to $90,000. "^aa 



No Tooth Picks. Ko Pin Cushions. Xo Tin Whistles. No Concert Ticiiets. No Pictures toi sali 
No Dollars to Invest. 



Ten Cents may Seeure $10,000. 



BKAI>, TIIJIVK A:V1> BELlKVb:. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



Atchison^ Kansas^ Patriot^ 

ItAII.Y A.\I> WKKKLY. 

Dally, $10 a Y.ear, ... Weekly, $3 a V'ear. 

the patriot h.v.s a lalkikk ciuculation than any other paper in ^vll the 
counties of northern kansas, southern nebraska and western missouri. 

ai>vertiseme:vts 

I.N Daily ou Weekly Editions as follows: 

1 incli space, 1 tiino, $1 00; I times, $:{ 00; i:{ times, $8 00; 2'; times, $15 00; 52 times, $35 (X). 

5 inohes space, 1 time, 4 00; 4 times, 10 00; 13 times, 25 00; 2G times, 40 00; 52 times, 75 00. 

10 inclu'.s space, 1 time, 800;4times, 2.) 00; 1.5 times, 00 00; 28 times, 100 00 ; 52 times, 1.50 00. 

Tlu'se rates are as low, eircnlatlon considered, as those of any otlier first-class paper. Pay 

mciits (luartcrlv in advance. Address 

NELSOIV ABBOTT, Atcliison, Kansas. 

JAMES T0BKA:VS, Editor. J. ii. TOW.ASEIVD, PubHsher. 

The Washington Post. 

A LIVE NEWSPAPER, PUULISIIKD EVERY THURSD-VV, AT WASIirSGTON, ARK. 
TORRAAS & TO^VJVSEA'B, Proprietors. 

liargest circulation of any paper in Southern or South-western Arliansas. Official Journal for 
Little River, Sevier and Hempstead counties. 

Terms of Suhscription, - - - $3 so Per Year, Invariably in Advakce. 

RATES OF ADVERTISIA'Ci : 

1 sqr., imo.,$3; 3mo., $7; Gmo.,$10; 1 yr., $15 1 1-4 col., 1 mo., .§15: 3mo.,$25; 6mo.,$35; lyr,$45 

2 " 1 " 5; 3 " 10; (i " 15:1 " 22 1 " 1 " 35; 3 " 75; 6 " 100:1" 1.50 

3 " 1 " 0; 3 " 12; G " 20; 1 " 30 | Special or Juliiorial Xntice.i 20 cents per line. 

Advertisements inserted for less period than six months must be paid for in advance. Ad- 
vertisemenUs running over six months, quarterly in advance. No <l(viation from the above 
terms. Our columns are alwavs full. All coninnniicatious must he addressed to 

T0RRA:VS &, TO%V.\J»EXI>, Proprietor-s. Wasliington, ArU. 



Capital Chronicle. 

8EM:I-WEEKI.,Y, .... BOISE city, IDAHO TERRITORY. 

Regular raw-head and bloods-bones order— that is, it "wades" into everj-body and every 
thing— won't keep its moutli shut unless it's paid, and that pretty big, too; consequently, every- 
body takes it. The only paper in the United states that llics the "Skull and Crossbones," and 
makes "tyranny" (in tiie way ol eorrujit otiicials) " trcnible." 

Correspondence from every City and Handet in the Tt'rritory will be found in its columns every 

issue. Persons wisliing'to learn anything of Idaho will find it in the CllROXlCLK. 

Terms (Cwrrouv/), $10 a Veak; Si.\ Months, $5. 

EVERYBODY CAN'T ADVERTISE IN IT— CAUSE, ITS CIRCULATION IS SO LARGE. 

RateM of Advertisinis^ {Currency): 

1 column, one year, $300; six months, - $175 1 1-2 column, one year, $175; six months, - flOO 

1 column, three months, $1(K); one month. i!(i | 1-2 column, three months, $(!0; one month, 36 

For less space, see the paper. P. B. IIAWKIXS, alias "SAIVDY," 

<'lii('f Boss, Capital Cltrouicle. 



The Darlington Democrat. 

I'riW.l.slIi;!) WKKKI.V. 
AT nARI.rlXlJTOi'^ «'. II.. SOl'TII <'AROI.,IlVA. 



BY E. P. i.rcAs, AT sa 50 i»i:r A:v.\'iT>r. 

As the Dkmcm'RAT has the hirge.ft cireulalion of any paper in Eastern South Carolina, 

and is situated in the Pee Deo Section, it presents a most 

excellent Advertising Medium. 



AMERICAN NEWSPArEE, RATE-BOOK. 327 



THE XiEAniiVG MASO.Mt' PI BT^ICATIO.V OF TIIK IT1VITEI> STATES. 

Masonic Monthly;, 

A Magazine of Fokty Hand.somklv I'uintki) Packs, in Dov\n.i: Columns. 
KsTABLisiiKi) IX Boston, Mass., in 1803. 

«3 SO per Year. ---.... vol. VH, 1870. 



..,-fi?V" ^^ '^*^*^'''^'''^ ^° "?*^®'^ * ^^'^'^^ ^'cl* throughout New En^Knd, this puhlioation has met 
with ftu- -reater siicc-ess than was anticipateil hv Um fouiiclers. Too general in its cliaVaptVr to 
have Its influence limiterl to the nei<rhborhoorl of its birtliphieo, it Iia^ found roaders and w^frm 
friends ,n evei-y part of the United States and Canadas. To the Mason it is invalnahlo for th™ 
f?!inT/"5n Jf ^■°" -^ ^■'*- ^r."":'" '' '■■-■ '■"««'-«''''»'^'- »'>t only to the Freemason himself, b. t to h\s 
HrWt; wf •' ,"'5n ^l'" «^»/'^""»f =^" original Masonic- Story an.1 Poem, and several Mausonic In- 
cidents, which illustrate how Masonvv is doin- ijood tlie world over 2d necnuse vmi optvnur 
STpaTrTn'a'ris^seenr" n";""r"'r'' """^■'"'^ ^","' .-.^ht.v pa.es (to b'e enlarged asloon fs'S 
nme- -,n^ ?.n?& -^f^'"' "^^ ' f.*^'^'' "/;i.^onic readin-. which, when bound, makes a valuable vol- 
"^n.;w" ^^^ vo uines oi this publication are now at a premium. .3d. Becmc^e it keens you 
"PM" on masonio mitters, not only in vour own vicinity and State, but in all the States and 

tdS fn'u.^ZL ''"^-i '^^T" '■ '■•' ""•'/ ''^"'^^ ^"'^ *'>" ^^«^t masonic writers in the comUry co" - 
tri bute to its pages. The following are regular features of the Moxthly : • y i-uu 

son,v'Tr;n1cr,^f*fV]PT"%'^"-l *""'■"'?''• ^"'* ''^.^^^ ^"- ^'^^ "'^ th^ee Editorials on the Current Ma.- 
n wi,^i^o "^® '^^\'! 'resides retaining the general editori.al management of the Mao'a7ine 

t^„l. v>7 '"'■''' '■e^f^lie productions of this justly favorite Masonic Editor well know that he 

is m r. A, ,-'!'}f '"?^'"^-' ''*"''^ ^''i- iiiauv questions which arise for discussion; while his Review 
lb m.Kic interesting to every reader by his facile pen. 

Bro. John K. Hall. Past D. D. G. M. of Mass.. and Past Commander of the Boston Fn 
campment, etc etc. will contribute series of articles during the veT.smiiar to ''How Ma^^^^ 
SLlyreadU ""'^ ^^""''''" '^"^''^^ ^'^"^^ ^"^" ^^'^'^^'^ ^"^^ s^o much favor, especially by 

,„-,i^*"'**-?'''*.i^***"*"'^' ^^- "•' ^^^^ G. M. of Kentucky, the celebrated Palestine Exnlorer 
will furnish a five-page article for each number, descriptive of his Tour in the Holy LamL^' 
„i ■^'"*** ■'; *^" f]>»'lel' tlie eminent ^Masonic Historian, of I.eipsic, Oerminv will furnish rew 
ular Reports on the condition of Masoni-y in Europe. There is probably no masonic writer on 
can^reit^'^f,"'" "i"- "'*" ^'^^^i^. better qualified for this duty than i. Bro FlndTandouT reader^ 
v^lue^'^thrMasoni^lCenr^"- '^""^^""'^' "^ "^" "^ entertaining, and consequenU^' o7S 
lhe^,^e*'nd*'nT^i!*nv?^n'Jo*''"" T^'""*^ f^'^'Y' ^risp, and cutting criticisms and articles, making him 
conn;.!fe^f/rSu[^ly contrihX ?^^ ^° interesting a feature in this Magazine. iTl 

MasoiUc Stoiy.*^^"'^'" ^^^'°''^ writings are deservedly popular, will occasionally contribute a 
Te.'^M^i-ln.^nar'^^ll^^^^^^^^^ -"^ -"t-^-t« -«cles on "Masonic 

-res,^!;^;^:*^j^^i.^!;(:-^ii;-^si^?s^]^^i^;;d!;^^:^-^^^ *--^- «- ^o- 

In addition to the above, occasional contributions are expected from the followin--- 

special contract. In remitting large amounts, P. O. Orders or Re<^stered I etters are nhsol^^^^^^ 
-safe, and can easily be obtained, but small amounts may be seK thfmairJ at oifr risk '^ 

AfVoJ' Rftte8, Which are very liberal, will be communicated on anplicntion to the Publisher 

Address all letters to the Publisher, 

THEOPH. G. WA1>MA1V, 36 Kilby St.. Boston. 

BiSHpiiSlsiilMlPHsE 

COVER PAGES SUBJECT TO SPECIAL CONTRACT. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Forum. 



JOHX R. CLYMKR, ..... IirCTKI'S, O, 

Tf rin« : "ia t*«T Aiimini, in .Idviiiicc. 

LEADING WKEKLY PAPEH IN NOHTIIKKN olIK^. 1IA\IN(; A E.MK.ER bonn-fide CIB- 

CULATIONTHAN ANY OTIIKU l'ri;i.!>ilK!) iHTSIDK oKTOLKIX) ()1{ CLEVELAND. 
Principles— Dcmocracj', a wliiio iiiun's jiovcniuiont, ircc tr:i(li', <'qn;il tu.\:ition, und payment of 
the boniii'd debt in f^roenbacks or leinuliuiio)!. 
Advertising Rate.s : Local, 10 cents per line for each insertion; Uesnlar, 1 inch space, S 
months, ^."i; () ino.s, $S; 1 year, $12. One column, 3 mos., $:io; e mos., $70; 1 year. $100. Advance 
cash payment.^ and no discount in anv ca.'ie. Authorized A f/rnts— Geo. P. Rowell & Co. and Pet> 
tengill & Co , New York, and J. F. Dibble & Co., Louisville, Ky. Samtlk Copies Fkf.e. 



The IMew-Berne Daily Times. 

GEO. W. JVA*io:\, Jr., Kditor mid Publisher^ 

SEVENTH VOLITVIE, 1S70. SIX DOLLARS YEARLY. 

The Times is a Fiust-class Daily Newspaper. Has a large and increasing circulation 

throughout North Carolina and adjoining States, 

WHICH COMMENDS IT TO THE ATTENTION OF ADVERTISERS. 

Ten lines or one inch is a square — $1 first insertion; 50 cents each subsequent insertion. 

Liberal discount to large or continued Advertisers. Address 

DAILY TI.IIES, ::Vew-Berne, JV. C, or GKO. P. KOWEl,!. &, CO., :V. T. 



The Western Vindicator. 

TL. P. ER1Vi:V, Proprietor, - . - . Ul TlIKRi- OKI>TO.X, :\ortli Caroli«n. 

HAS A LARGE CIRCULATION A M O N ti BUSINESS CLASSES- 
COPIES SENT UPON APPLICATION. 



One square. 
Two '■ 
Four " 


1 mo. 

ti .^)0 
4 00 
7 00 


2 mo. 

« 00 
10 00 


.3 mo. 

$.T 00 
8 00 
12 00 


Adverti-iii 

mo. 1 yr. 

$7 00 $10 00 
12 00 IS 00 

20 00 :« 00 


ig Rates : 

1-f column, 
1-2 column, 
1 column, 


1 mo. 

?I0 00 
1.1 00 
20 00 


2 mo. .3 mo. 

$U 00 $17 00 
21 00 2;-, 0-} 
.•50 00 ;w 03 


mo. 
$2.5 00 

;m 00 

50 00 


1 yr. 

$10 00 
,iO 00- 
100 OO 



Bangor Daily Whig and Courier^ 

AM) Tin; 

B.V.\<i<»K IVlCEJtrV COrRIER, 

Ilnngor, Mmlue. 

BEST AD V K Ii T 1 > 1 N (i .M E D 1 U M S I N E A S T i; It N M A INK. 
.!i>:i\ BJ. L,Y.\I>i:, P.;£>iJlietor. 



The Enterprise. 



A FOUR-P.VtiJI:: MXTK!:.\'-<'OI.l'.n.\ PAPEK. PI III.,ISHEI> .HOr^Tfll.Y. 

Devoleil lo LitpriUure and .\rt. Kilitcd. ]»nhlished and coniributed to by the ynuag iieoiilo'. 
The largf."^! :.nd bc.~t pajjer in Ihi' couiilry pubuslii-d by youth. Terms : Single copy, 1 year ."io 
cents; .-ami.ic nuinbrrs, .'. cents. A<lvertiiiii4^ Knte.s : One s'[uare 10 liiw'8 or loss, 1 insertion. 
.W cents; ■.; ins. rliiiiis, 7.'. cents; ( in-crliuns ^- 1 2.'>. 

Prlneijinl «»nUc--A. I'. Ihillork. I'c.sldllicc Bo.k 187, Peekskill. N. Y. 

Brniicb OiKees— K. .1. HaUock. 12 Mancr .^I ., Berlin, Prussia ; C M. IIaiglil.;8 South Ith St.^ 
Brooklyn, E. I); F. Ilaii^'ht, .San .Jose, Cal; D. P. Lindslev, Mendon, Mass; If B Ilallock, No. 6 
St. Luke's Place, N. V. City; Geo. Truman, U2 North 7th St. Phila ; T. B. Hull, .".s South Charles St., 
Balliinore: Edward Ilaiglit, Sparta, Canada West. A. P. IIAI^LOCH. Peekskill, :i¥. Y. 



Royal Gazette $t Newf land Advertiser, 

Establlshi <l l'p\var<5M of Sixty A'enrn, liiivin^ been First Issued in ^^•Or, 

i.s i>(blisiii;d wkkkly at st. .ioiins, m:\\ loi ndland. 

Being the OllicKd organ oi the t;ovcrnnicnt . and the <liaiinel through which the acts of the 
Legislature are oroiij^h! belote the public, circulates among tlie <illice-hol(l<'rs and others con- 
nected \\ilh tlie(.o\erninenl throughout tl)elslan<l, as well as ainon:^i)ar(ies engaged in trade, Ac. 

Ka4<-« of Adverti.>«ii«p: I Notices not exceeding 12 lines— tirst inserlion, $1 ,'ji); two or more" 
squares 12 lines each first inscrliini, per sq., $1 00; and for ea'h subscipieMt ins-rlicui. onc-thircT 
of first charge. J. V. WVmVAlS, Proprietor «n;l Publisher. 

Agents lor the ^vwf.Miitdliind CJaT.ctt;- in New "> ink, .Messrs. t;KO. P. RoWEi.i. ,t Co., 40 Park 
Row, at whose office the pujier is (lied. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. S2S) 



THE LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY PAPER IN THE CITY ANT) STATE. 



The Savannah Morning News^ 



I>AIJLY, TRI-^VJEEKLiY AWI) \VEEKt,Y. 



Tills Paper is the Best Advertising Mediiun Offered in ita Section to Advertisers. 

IT IS THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAPI AND THE RECOGNIZMD 
LOCAL AND COMMERCIAL NEWSPAPER. 



Savannah has made rapid strides in commercial advancement during the past four years, 
and is now generally regarded as the most prosperous city of the South. The immense receipts 
of cotton during the past two years show that she is destined to he the cotton port of the United 
States; already her lines of railroads extend to Mississippi, monopolizing the entire carrying 
trade of the counties through which they pass, and bringing the staple to her wharves. 

Besides this. Savannah is the market of supplies for a large portion of Georgia and Florida, 
and the merchants and planters depend entirely ou the local press for information in regard to 
prices, crop prospects and general news. 



PRICES OF AWVERTISEWEIVTS TJS SAVABTNAH MOR^IHTG WEW^S : 

Regular Rates : 

One square— ten lines or less Nonpareil type— first insertion, - - - $1 Oo 

Each subsequent insertion. ■ - 75 

One column, one day, - - - - - - . - 28 00 

Business Notices in Local column, per line— flr.st insertion, ... 25 

Each sab.sequcnt insertion. - - 15 
Advertisements in Weekly, for each insertion, per rs(iuarc. - - - i oo 
Advertisements inserted every other day, twice a wi:i;k ht once a week, each inser- 
tion, if for less than a month, per square, - - - - - i 00 



Squares. 


1 month. 


2 montl 


1 


$12 


$22 


2 


22 


40 


3 


:iO 


."io 


4 


38 


70 


5 


46 


So 


6 


54 


100 


7 


(12 


115 


8 


70 


128 


9 


78 


142 


10 


81) 


I'n 


11 


!« 


108 


12 


100 


ISO 


l.J 


10'; 


103 


U 


112 


205 



Contract Rates i 

3 montlis. 4 months. 5 months. 
$44 
77 
105 
133 
161 
189 
217 
245 
273 



392 



«30 
55 


*s 


75 


90 


95 


114 


115 


138 


i;i5 


162 


1.55 


186 


175 


210 


195 


2:54 


215 


255 


230 


276 


248 


297 


•I'Vd 


315 


280 


336 



6 months. 
$50 
85 
115 
150 
185 
215 



310 
340 
370 
395 
420 
445 



9 months. 
$65 
110 
1.55 
200 
245 
285 
325 
365 
405 
445 
480 
515 
550 
585 



12 mos. 
$75 
125 
175 
225 
275 
325 
375 
420 
465 
510 
550 
5fK) 
630 
670 



Advertisements inserted every other day for one month or longer, three-fourths of the fore- 
going table rates. When inserted twice a week, twp-thirds (jf the table rates. When inserted 
once a week for one month or longer, $1 per square for each insertion. 

When Advertisements, Business Notices. &c., are elianged, they will be charged for as though 
inserteii for the first time. 

Terms of Subscription : Daily, one year, $10; Tri- Weekly, $G; Weekly, $2. 
Advertisements can be sent through any responsible advertising agency, or to 

J. H. ESTIXjI,, Proprietor Savaiuiali Morning IVc-vrs, 

111 Bay Street, Savaunali, Georgia. 



AMERICAN NEWSrAPER RAT£-EOOK. 



PBACTICAli ! EDITCATIOIVAL, I SCIE\'TIFIC ! 

The Gardener's Monthly. 

THE BEST IIOUTICl I/nrKAL JOURNAL IN THE UNITED STATES. 
EOITKI) BY THOMAS iVEEHAIV. 



DBVOTED TO IIORTICUETUUE, ARBORICULTURE, AND RURAL AFFAIRS GENERALLY 
SubscriptioM : $3 Per Auiiuni, iii Advance. 

SPKCI.VEX Xl'.UBEnS SKXT, POSTAGE FREK. OX Al'PLICATIOX. 



This Jonmal, now in its eleventh year, is successfully sustained by f^iving in the Magrazine the 

$2 wortli for the $2. It does not eke out the value in presents; but relies on a regular and 
solid subsfi-iption list and good sound advertising patronage for sustenance. 

To SUl?S(i:ir.Ki;s it bus long been a companion and authority, and to ADVERTISERS it 
■proves a real value as it goes riglit to readers who are their customers; who take the Jlagazine 
DCcause they ivaiit it, and who therefore read it. 

Liberal discounts olfercd to Club Agents, who will please write for our terms. 

Our advertising rates will be found to be cheaper, in proportion to our circulation and in- 
fluence, than any other Horticultural Journal, circulating as we do in every State and Territory 
of the Union. 

Terms of Advertisiiia; s 







1-8 column. 


1-t col. 


l-:i col. 


1-2 col. 


1 column. 


Ipa 


Se. 


One time, 


each. 


$:i 00 


$5 00 


$7 00 


$10 00 


$20 00 


%:'i 


) 00 


Two to Five times. 




2 00 


4 00 


6 00 


00 


15 00 




) 00 


Six to Twelve " 


" 


2 00 


3 50 


5 00 


8 00 


12 00 


20 00 


Send orders and 


copy 


on or before 


25th of 


each mouth. 


to secure 


insertion in 


follow 


ing 


month's issue. 


















Address 








BRUVCKLOE & MAROT, PuliHshers, 
]Vo. 2.1 IVortli Sixth St., PIiiladelpHin 


'. 





















Wood's Household Magazine. 



$3,;J00,000 I.\' PREMIUMS. 



miere are in the United States over Six Million Families. Wherever the ground has been thor- 
oughly canvassed, at least every second family, on an average, lias subscribed for 
Wood's Houseliold Mnsyazine. According to this calculation, there are 
yet nearly three million t'amili(\s ready to subscribe for our Mag- 
azine as soon as they shall be properly solicited to do 
so. < )nr preiiiiiniis lorthe enlli-etion ofthese 
subscriptions will amount to 
about $3.:{00,000. 



REAI>! REA1>!! REAI>!1! 

In Addition to our Reculnr l>reiniuins, we otTer the following oxtra.s: To the senders 
of the five largest clubs bctoie March Kst., 1S70, One Hundred I>Mllar.<4 eacli. We will also 
fnrnisb to each s«d)scriber in these live largest clubs, any premium which we now furnisli for 

two subscrilH?-s. 

The nlijert of the first proposition is to stimulate those raising clubs to work a little harder 
for tlie chancr oi gaining the iiii/.e of $100 in addition to the premiums tliey would otherwise re- 
ceive. The object oi the second proposition is to encourage persons to subscribe, with the hop« 
of being among the lueUy number. 

S. S. WOOI>. 

Newbukgii, N. Y., Dec. 1, isci). 

To .IdvertlHersi 

A few IbishuisH Notices taken on liberal tonus. 



For specimen copy and ratew, iiddre.-w 

M. S. %VOOI>, IMibllHher and Proprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 331 



XIIE CHE VPKST A:VI> BEST A1>VEBTISIIVG .1IEl>iri»I EV THE TIVITEO STATES. 



The Wliami Valley News, 

IMHMSHED AT 

PiaVA. MIAMI COrWTY, OHIO, 

Is a larf,'e 32-eoInniii folio, and having: a circulation extending to every part of Miami County of 
Fifteen Hundred Copies (which is constantly increasing), being more than 

Double that of any other Paper published in the County. 

I8 a most valuable and cheap medium for Advertising, as its rates are the same as those of other 
papers having less than one-half the circulation. 

Thr News is a Family Journal of High Moral Tone, and Republican in Politics. 
IVo Objectionable IMtedical Advertisements will be Inserted. 



Miami County is one of the wealthiest and best comities in the State of Ohio. It is thickly 
settled with an intelligent, reading people, fully up to the age, and is making grand strides for- 
ward in the great march of Progress. Until recently its people have been almost entirely en- 
gi-ossed in Agricultural pursuits, but within a short time manufactures have been taking the 
front rank in the attention of the people, and gi-eat activity is being displayed in that direction. 
Utilizing the magnificent water-power within her limits, with everything necessary to manufac- 
turing enterprise within easy reach, Miami county bids fair soon to deserve the title of the great 
manufacturing centre of Ohio. Already many large establishments are in active operation, 
and many more are projecting and maturing. 

Piqua, situated at the junction of the Pittsburg, St. Louis and Chicago, and Dayton and 
Michigan Railroads, and the Miami and Erie Canal, is a flourishing city of ten thousand (10,000) 
inhabitants. It has received a new and strong impetus from the building of a hydraulic canal, 
{which is now in progress) which will furnish a water-power equal to 90 run of stone. Under the 
fostering influence of this enterprise it is not improbable that in ten years Piqua will have 
more than doubled her population. 

Troy, the county seat of Miami county, is a thriving town of five thousand inhabitants, sit- 
uated eight miles south of Piqua on the D. and M. Railroad, and the M. and E. Canal. It is also 
pushing rapidly forward a hydraulic canal, similar to that building at Piqua, which will doubt- 
less result in the greatest benefit to it. 

Tippecanoe, seven miles south of Troy, in Miami county, is a wide-awake towTi of fifteen 
hundred inhabitants. Large whiskey and alcohol establishments are located there, besides 
numerous other manufacturing establishments. It has also a fine water-power. 

Covlnf^ton, in Miami county, is a driving, go-ahead place of about the same population as 
Tippecanoe. Situated on the P., St. L. and C. Railroad and the Stillwater River, economizing 
the splendid water-power from the Stillwater Falls, and being the centre of a magnificent grain- 
growing district, it bids fair to be at a future day a place of no mean importance. 

In addition to these, the more prominent towns, Miami county has several other villages of 
smaller size, but all thriving and improving. 

In each and every one of these towns the Miami Valley News has a circulation second to 
that of no other paper, whether published in or out of Miami county. 

Persons advertising in the News will have the advantages of— 1st. The largest circulation in 
the county. 2d. A circulation all aver the county, and not confined to any jxiilicular section ; and 
3d., they will pay no more for advertising in 'the News than they would in any other paper 
published in the county, and will secure by this means double the advertising for the same 
amount of money expended. 

No page contains less than two columns of reading matter, and only a limited space is al- 
lowed for advertisements. 



1 column, 1 year, - - - - $100 00 1 1 inch space, 1 vear, - - - $10 00 

1-2 " " ... ,5:) 00 ■ • 6 months, - - 000 

1-t " •• - - - ;» 00 I •• •• 3 '• - - - 4 00 

More or less space in proportion. Local Notices, to regular advertisers, eight (8) cents per 
line each insertion: tran.sicnt, ten (10) cents per line each insertion. In all cases payable 
•quarterly in advance. 

October 1, 1839. W. J. VAIVCE, Editor and Proprietor. 



3:^2 AM1;RR"AN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

Farmer's Gazette and Industrial Index. 

TIIK (UIOAI'KST AiillK ILTl HAI. .^JO.\THI>Y l.\ A.MKUIt A. 

Is puljlished in Richmond, Vii., and is devoteil. iis its niimc indicates, to the interest olihu 

Farmer, Gardener, Fruit Grower, Stock Kaiser. Inventor, Mannfacturer, House 

Keeper, Meeliunic anil Miner. 

Terms, $1 Per Annum, i.n Am axce. 

ratp:.s of ADVKRTISING: 

1 m. •2 m. ;J m. (i m. 1 yr. I 1 m. 2 m. .1m. 6 m. 1 yr. 

1 square, $2 ()0 $1 00 $r} 00 $8 00 $12 00 I col., or 1-2 page. $10 00 ^l.") 00 $20 00 ^^.t 00 $(50 00 

1-2 col., or 1-4 page, (> 00 lO 00 1.') 00 25 00 35 00 1 1 page, - - 15 00 2;") 00 ai 00 GO 00 100 OO 

OX COVER, DOl'BLE RATE.S. 

P.\Y.MENTS— -Vnnual advertisements, payable quarterly in advance; all others in advance. 

S. BASSETT FIIEIVCH, P. O. Box 4«»0, Riclunoiid, Va. 



The Landmark. 

A WEEKr,Y MASOATIC JOirKXAL, OF SIXTEEIV PAGES. 

Devoted to Masonry, Literature, the Arts and Sciences. 
THREE DOLLARS PER ANNUM ; $1 75 FOR SIX MONTHS. 
AI>VERTISI.\'G KATES: 

Per line of Nonpareil once, - - 10 cents. I 5 lines, tlircc months. - - - $4 00 

One month, 30 ■ in ..... 7 00 

Three months. 80 ■ | 15 10 00 

Si.K months, $125 !."> six •• 18 00 

One year, - - • ■ - - 2 00 I 15 • one vear, ;{0 00 



L,AIVI»IAUK ASSOCI.\TIOX, Publishers and Proprietors, 

40 Fnltou Street, IVew York. 

Geo. p. Rowell & Co. authorized Advertising Agents. 



Record of the Times. 

A BUSINESS AND FAMILY NEWSI'.V I'KK. 
PlTBtlSHEH EVERY WEDMKSO.VA BY W.M. V. MIIVER 

>Vilkes-Barre, LiUzerne CoiiiiJy, Pa. 

The rapid increase in business, population and wealth of the \V\o7ning Coal Field renders 
its trade important to the seaboard cities. Luzerne is one of the" lnrnest counties in Penn- 
sylvania, and is in dirx^ct railroad communication with New York, I'liihidclphia and BiiltiTnore. 
as well as with the North and West. The Record of tUe Times is the oldest paper i iiblished in 
the county, and has liecn thi' must iiopuhir ailvcrtisini,' iiicdiiiin loruiort' than si.xteeii \ cars undiT 
the present manageuifiil. 'I'icwms, Cash in Aunasck. subscriiit inn .^J :<o per annum'. 

HATES OF AI)\-KKT1SI.N(; (/.',„• a<lr,rtisi,i</ a s<j„arc of cl</ht Ihie^). 
1 or :i weeks, $1 .50; 1 month, - - - $J 00 I 1-8 col., :{ mo., $8 0(i; ti mo., $12 00; 12 m.. $1(> 00 
F:icl\ sul)sc(|ucnt insertion less than 12, 25 cents I 1-4 col., 3 mo , 15 00; « mo., 20 00; 12 m.. ;{0 00 

Three niontlis, ;?1 (K) .Auditor's Notices, 2 50 

(i months, $■; 00; 9 mouths, $8 00; 1 year, «!lo m I 1-2 col., 3 mo , $25 00: mo., $40 00; 12 m., $(^5 00 

Executor's and A<linini.strator's Notices, 3 oo | 1 col., 3 mo., 40 00; mo., <)5 00; 12 m.. 125 00 

Transient aud Legal advertisements charged by tlie square. 

Cray^s I^ew Engird Real Estate Journal 

CONTAINS INFOirMAllON OF IMI'OUTANCE TO TIIIO PL UCIIASKK, SELLER AM) 

IIOLDKU OF FVERV DESCRIPTION OF ItEAL ESTATE. 

Ia!4ii<il Siml->I<>i»»hly. i«t - . . «j[i j>oj .ViuiiiMi. 

I'riiMSIIED UY 

JA.niOS <;it\Y, Real Estale AxeiU, 

NO I SCOI, LAY'S lU II, DING. P.OSTON. .MASS ACIII'SK I'TS. 



*a- Advertisements payable in advance, inserted at the rate of 91 pei sqauii- foi- muih. 
ksertion, one inch constituting a square. Samile Copies vuee. 



AMEHICAN NEWriPAPEH RATE-BOOK. 333 



A Sl'PEUIOU ADVKRTISIiVG MEDIUM FOR TIIK WESTEK^ TRAWI5. 



The Western Monthly^ 



THE LITERARY MAGAZINE OF THE WEST. 



TFra rj:cognized position of this monthly as the leading kkpresentativi 
OF the literary culture of the great west, 

AJfD ITS GEWEBAI. CIBCUr.ATIOar 

Ttu-cmgli Obio, Indiana, Miclilgan, Illinois, Iowa, tVisconsin, Minnesota, Mlssonri, 
and other States and Territories, 

MAKE IT A SUPERIOR MEDIUM FOB EASTERIV ADVERTISERS 

WHO WISH TO REACH THE WESTERN TRADE. 



Rates of Advertising : 

•fJatsidej Pago of Cover, each insertion, ----- - iglOO 00 

Inside pages, whole page, each insertion, - - - - - 50 00 

Inside pages, half page, each Insertion, - - - - - - tW 00 

Inside pages, quarter page, each insertion, - - - - - ].") 00 

"In^iiile pages, one square, or one-twelfth page, tliree months, - . . 20 00 



THE WESTERIV MONTHLY COMPACT, 
JSTo. 18 Tribune BnUding, Cliicago, Illinois. 

'rj»e ■Western Monthly can be found on file at the Advertising Agency of Geo. P. Rowhll 
Jk, Co., No. 40 Park Row, New York, where adrertising contracts may be matle. 



334 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

The Odd Fellows^ Companion. 

AN KlGIITV-rAGK MONTHLY MAdAZINK. 
Publislied in Kns^lisli and (ierman, by . M. 4.'. LILLKV &. CO., Culnmbus, O. 

The Companion was established in 18l>5. Its circuhitiou in Dec. lAW was 11,100; at tliis time, 
Sept. 18.i9, it is 17,4<K), an increase of over (i.ooO in nine niontlis, and its circulation is still rapidly 
increasing, ^eg" We furnish to advert isci's a printer's ccitilicale ol' ninnljcr of copies jirintecl. 
Circulation in the Middh; and Western .-tales .\I)\i;utisin(; U.\tf.s {quarterly in (ulrdttce) : 
1 page, 1 month, $;»; ;5 nios. $'.K); Gmu-^. ^Hm; IJ inos i.:M). l-i' iiiij^i;, or 1 culunm, 1 niontli, $10; 
4 mos. $50; 6 mos. $',tO; 1> nios. $1(m. l--2cohunn, 1 month, $l>: .Suios. iJliO; Cinos. S.">u: \1 mos. JIK). 1-4 
col., 1 mo. $7; 3 mos. $17; Gmos. $30; 12 mos. $511; l-Scol., 1 mo.,Sl; 3 mos. $10; G mos. $17: 12 mos. $30, 



The IWonthly Wliscellany. 

Tlie nandsonii-st and Best Amateur Magazine publitilied in tlie United .StRtes. 

Devoted to Miscellaneous Literature, Progression, Hutnor, and General Intelligenc*. 
Beautifully printed, illustrated cover, and circulation double that of any 
Magazine of its class published. 

Advertising Rates: lOc. per line; Editorial Notices, iOc. per line. Twenty per cent, discount 
on advertisements inserted three mouths. Advei'tisements set in Nonpareil type. 

G£0. G. B£RRY, Publi.'ilier, IVortli StraflTord, A'. H. 



Daily $c Weekly, Quincy, III., Journal. 

ONE OF THE MO.ST FLOUKISHING AND rUO.SI'EIlOUS PAPERS IN ILLINOIS. 
Local Notices, '20 cents per line. Foreign advertisements inserted at reasonable rates. 

I>.1iIT.,Y Aivn WEEKLY QIUXCY TRIBFI\E (<;erman). 

One of the ol(hst (icrmun jiapcrs in the State, and the only (icrTuan papi'r in Western Illinois. 
Advertising at li\ ing rates. Tlie, Journal and Tkibunk are ai'notig the best advertising mediums 
for Western 111. and North ;Miss()nri. The Journal and Tiuiunk l)ui!ding is the finest in the State, 
outside of the Chicago Tribune, which is an evidence of th(> prosperity and api)reciation of these 
two papers. T. M. ROGERS, Publislier and Proprietor. 



The American Lutheran. 

A LARGE WEEKLY PAPEU, DEVOTED TO RELIGION, TEMPERANCE AND EDUCATION. 

I'ubli.shed at Selinsgrove, Pa., .50 miles above Harrisburg, on the M. C. Pa. R. R., the site of a 
Lutheran Classical Institution, Theological Seminary and Susquehanna Female College. 

Rates of Advertising : 1 square (12 lines), 1 insertion, $1; 2 weeks $1 50; 3 weeks $2; 4 weeks 
$2 50; 6 weeks $3; 2 months $3 25; 3 mos. $3 50; 6 mos. $5; 9 mos. $C; 1 year $S. 

JOS' On advertisements by the column or half column a liberal discount will be made from the 
above rates. Adilress P. A:vsT-\1>T, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



The People's Journal. 

C. t,. AI^I.,EIV, JR., Editor. 

An Independent Newspaper, having (with one or two exceptions) the largest circulation 
in Northern New York, (sspecially among farmers, business men, and the legal fraternity. 

Rates of Advertising: 

20 cents a lino each insei-tion, Nonp. measure. | Business Notices. - 15 cents per line. 

The right of rejection is reserved. Payment in advance. 

^V. J. Ki:VG. Publislier, Greenwich, New York. 

The Evangelical IVIessenger. 

A RELKilor 



WKKKI.V. CIKClLATIvS IN 20 STATES. 




liUINTI.Klll-. n<>T.S<iHl.TKil. 




i;i;i.i(;i()i s wkkki.v in the united states. 




trs of AdveilNlni; in <ncli: 




inie, $1. .\t siiMie rales lor less time than 3 months. 




12 mos. t:21 1 11 col., 3 mos. $IS; (i mos. $S4 ; 12 mos. 


*1U 


12 " .l.S 1-2 " 3 " '.11!; « " ICS; 12 " 


288- 


12 " 72 1 1 " 3 " 17.-.; « " 310; 12 " 


525- 



e. I fJOllorlal Notices, - M cenis per line. 
Address >V. >V. ORWIG, Cleveland, Ohio. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



THK OIVLY CATHOLIC MAGAZIIVI5 IIX THE riVITKI* STATES. 



The Catholic World, 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND SCIKNCK. 



Tub Catuolic World contains original articles from the best Catholic English -writers at 
home and abroad, as well as translations from the reviews and magazines of Franco, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Italy and Spain. Its readers are thus put in possession of the choicest produc- 
taons of European periodical literature in a cheap and convenient form. 



Extract from Letter of Pope Pius IX. 

Rome, December 30, 1808. 
KBv. I. T. Hkcker: 

We heartily congi-atulate vou upon the esteem which your periodical, The Catholic World. 
has, through its erudition and perspicuity, acquired even among those who differ fi-om ns, etc 

PIUS IX., Pope. 

Letter from the most Rev. Archbishop of Xew York. 

New York, February 7, iaj5. 
Dear Father IIecker: 

I have read the Pro.spectus which you have kindly submitted of a new Catholic Magazine,, 
to be entitled " The Catholic World," which it is proposed publishing in this city under your 
supervision ; and I am happy to state that there is nothing in its whole scope and spirit which 
has not my hearty approval. The want of some such periodical is widely and deeply felt, and I 
cannot doubt that the Catholic community at large will rejoice at the prospect of having this 
want, if not fully, at least in great measure supplied. 

With the privilege which you have of drawing on the intellectual wealth of Catholic Europe, 
and the liberal means placed at vour disposal, there ought to be no such word as /aiVwre in 
your vocabulaiy. 

Hoping that this laudable enterprise will meet with a well-merited success, and under God's 
blessing become fruitful in all the good which it proposes, 

I remain. Rev. Dear Sir, very tinily, your friend and servant in Christ, 

JOHN, Archbishop of New York. 

Copy of Letter fro'in Cardinal Barnabo. 

„ - Rome, September 3, 1865. 

Kbv. Father: 

I have heard of the publication of " The Catholic World " with great satisfaction. I anticl. 
pate lor it a complete success. There are so many periodicals in our day occupied in attacking 
the truth that it is a source of pleasure to its friends when the same means are employed in the 
defence of it. I return you my thanks for the attention paid in sending me " The Catholic 
World." I pray the Lord to preserve you many years. 

Affectionately in the Lord, 

ALEXANDER, CARDINAL BARNABO, 
„ . „ ,, „ . „ Prefect of the Propaganda. 

Eev. I. T. Hecker, Superior of the Congregation of St. Paul, N. Y. 



THE CATHOLIC >\'ORL,I> 

Forms a double-column octavo magazine of 144 pages each number, making two large vol- 
umes, or 1,7'28 pages each year, and is lurnished to subscribers for 

FIVE DOLLARS A YEAR, INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE. SINGLE COPIES, 50 CENTS. 
AU remittances and communications on business should be addressed to 

t,A>VRE:WCE HEHOE, General Agent, 

TKe Catliolic Publication Society, 
P. O. Box 3,396. IVo. ISO IVassau Street, Wew Yorlt^ 



TO ADVERTISERS. 

Advertisements of any respectable and legitimate business received at the following rates - 

One Page one time, - - $(iO I Quarter Page one time, - - $20 

Half Page one time, - - 35 | One-eighth Page one time, - 10 

NO QUACK MEDICINE ADVERTISEM:ENTS INSERTED. 



SSO AMERICAN NEWSPArER^ RATE-BOOK. 

BEI>rCEI> SI'BSCKIPTIOIV OF 

The Vedette. 

TUB COURSK OF THK VKI>1:TTK WILL BK UNWAVERING IN THE CAUSE OF RKJnX ; 
ALWAYS OPPOSING WKOIVG TO THE HITTER END. 

Vfo shall deal with the questions of the day in a way that will prove most beneficial to the gen- 
eral government and the people at large. We will advance, as lies in our power, the 
improvement and development of the great State of Texas. 

Wo shall urge all improvements of an A^^isultural, Horticultural and Sfechanical 

Character ; or any other improvements we may deem to tlie interest of the people generally. 

Pkoorkssion wUl be written, in indelible letters, upon cvei-j- page of The Vedettk. 

This will bo our main standard to which we expect to rally in defending and supporting the 
good of the stilt t-. Wo will strive to convince the world of the greiit benefits derived from the 
tnuli; of till' I.,oiic Star State, a.s well as urge, to our utuio.st capacity, iuuiiigration, civilization, 
jiionilitv and ('hii.-^tianity. We will also advocate the Cau«f of Temperance, which we con- 
sider an" iniporlaiit link in morality and Christianity. We have reduced our subscription to tlie 
following i-.YCccdiugly low ratc-s :" 

Terms — Specie : 

One copy, sis months, - - - $1 00 I Ten copies, one year, - - - $18 00 

-Ono copy, one year, - - - - 2 00 | Twenty copies, one year, - - - 35 00 

All persons getting up a club of more than ten will be allowed one copy gratis. 
AH communications should be addressed to 

VIC. BEHVHAIIUT, Kdltor and Proprietor, 
Gains^-ille, Texas. 



Summit Weekly Times. 

A CONSKKVATIVE JOURIVAr,. 

P U R L I S II E D AT SUMMIT, PIKE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI 



F. T. COOPER, Proprietor. 



Tlie attention of parties desiring to advertise In this section is respectfully invited to 
these facts : 

1. The Town of .Summit is situated on the New Orleans, Jackson and G. N. Railroad, midway 
l)etween the cities of Jackson, Miss., and New Orleans, La. Is the chief Commercial point be- 
tween those cities. Ships about I.'),000 bales of cotton annually. Has about .3,500 population, 
and i.s growing rapidly both in wealth and jiopulation. 

a. Tlif TiMKH, now in its tliird volume, is a lar^'e H-column paper, and has the largest circu- 
latiun iif ai)>- paper piililislied in Soutli Missi^-sipjii ; printed on a new Iloe'.s Power Press, and 
cireululx^s lr(!e!\- In the counties of Minds, l'o|)iah, Sini])son, Covington, .Maricui. Lawrence. 
Franklin, Amite ami Pike; also in the adjoining parishes of Louisiana, and in all the thriving 
towns along the line of Railroad from Jackson to New Orleans. 

3, ItM rates are not above other papers in Mississippi, and it has one price for oil advertisers. 



Ono flrpnvro, 1 Inch, 
Two " ■.; •• 
Four " I •' 

Onc-fiuarior eolunin. 
On IV 1ml f 
Ot»o 



Idvrrttiiix 


If; Ratm t 








1 month. 


3 months. 


6 months. 


9 months. 


1 year. 


$t (K) 


$7 M 


$10 00 


$12 :>o 


Jl.-i (K» 


i; IN) 


12 (H) 


17 .50 


22 (K) 


2.'> 00 


HI (K) 


IS 00 


2r. 00 


.•f) (H) 


40 00 


\r, M 


•i'l 00 


■.ic 00 


.VJ (K) 


tK» <X) 


■ib 00 


40 00 


DO 00 


■SO 00 


100 (X) 


40 00 


bO 00 


126 00 


1(» 00 


200 00 



AMERICAN liEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



337 




22 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



KKt,r,OG«'S IMPnOVEI> 

NK.W STYLE 

Newbury Blank and Card Press. 

Patented by \. &. IJ. Nkwuuuv, Jiilij hth, 1S.59, and A. N. Kellou<;, Jan. nth, 18<53. 



This Press prints a fonn 
« 3-4 by 11 .l-l, the size of a 
page of foolseap, or will 
print a sheet about U by 
17, by working and turn- 
ing. Is capable of print- 
ing 1,000 to 1,500 an hour. 
Will do superior work. 
Price, boxed, with Table 
and latest improvonicnts, 
S150. Weight, 350 lbs. 

Terms Cash. 




With each Press are 
sent: Two Chases, with 
Sidesticks, two pairs Roll- 
er Stocks, Roller Mould, 
three Friskets, Wrenches, 
and a Rubber Blanket— 
the whole carefully box'd. 

The Press is shipped al- 
most ready for operation, 
but for the convenience 
of purchasers, directions 
for .setting it up and ope- 
ratinETiiro forwarded with 
each I'rcss. 



THK O:\T.T tllK.VP PRKSS THAT Wit,!. I>0 G001> ITORK RAPIDI.T. 



WHAT IS SAID OF IT. 



From H. BeaU, Omro, fFi-i.:—'- We almost wor- 
ship it." 

From Thos. E. Axh, Providence, R. /..— " I think 
the worl<l of it." 

From Farley if Holman, Franklin, Ind.:—"'V/'e 
would not be witliout it for twice its price." 

From John Turner {Pub. Star), Mauston, jrw..— 
"It has paid for itself nearly a hundred times 
over." 

From John Ulrich (Pub. Kord Stern). La Crosse, 
Wis.:—" We believe It is the best and most per- 
fect jjress for its price in the world." 

From Miller </ Underwood (J'ub». Courier), 
Charleston, /«..—" It works like a charm, and 
does better work tliaji any other press extant." 

From C. A. Heed, lieA Hook, X. 1'..— "The press 
suits me to a charm. Will work plenty fast 
enough, ami do good work." 

From .liidij F,U {Pub. J'ost), Xa.ihua, Iowa :— 
"Tilt! I'rcss imrcliiisfd of yon works to a charm. 
The Post prmt<-rs an' diOi^Milt-d with it." 

From JiJm C. Artz, W< llin;it<>n, O/iio.— "Our 
Jobber has proved to lie (■v(r\ thing it is repre- 
sented. I could not be hctter picasrd." 

From Potrers (f Foster {Pubs. Times), Durand, 
Wis.:—" The litUe press works to a charm. We 
wouldn't begin to take the price we paid you 
for it." 

From Wm. Wagner {Pub. Anzeiger), Freeport, 
III.:—" It prints very rapidly, tint, still better, 
its work com pants lavorably with that of any 
press I know." 

From G. S. Nicholas, Linneus, Mo.: — " I am en- 
tirely satistled with the Press. It is the best I 
ever saw for the price, and is Indispensable in 
the oflic*-." 

From McCulh, <f- Krfins, Otiumira, lovm:—" It is 
asuccf'ss. Till- iniprcs-ioM ise<|unllvasgood as 
a '(;onlon's.' We eaii tnillilully say that it is 
even better than we anticipiilod." 

FOR SALK BY 



From T. C. Medary {Pub. Mirror), Lansing, 
Iowa .— " The little Press I purchased of you 
four years ago is an excellent one and has 
given me entire satisfaction. I can recommend 
it highly." 

Fromihe Union Free Press Co., Kittanning, Pa.r 
—"We have introduced one of Kellogg's Im- 
proved Xewlniry Card and Blank Presses, 



■h for neat, clean and beautiful prmting 
L-cTled." 



cannot be exct 

From 1. D. Boyle {Pub. Democrat). Xcosho Falls, 
Ks.:—'' It is the best card and liill-head press we 
ever worked. Cards can be worked on it neat- 
ly at the rate of fifteen hundred per hour. We 
are satisfied." 

From II. < '. Miller, Jackson C. H., Ohio .— " I can 
reeoniinend the press to the fraternity as the 
b(tst clieap-joljber in the world. I think more of 
the press every day. It is a ixifcct little gem." 

From II. I), irngiicr. Omaha, Xib.: — "If your' 
•Jobber cost as much as the (Jordon's, Well's or 
Degener's, and tho.se presses cost only ^\M, I 
would still prefer the Improved Jobber as it 
now is." . 

From Turner (f Clark {Pubs. Patriot), Carroll- 
ton, Mo.: — "It works siilciididly, and prints 
cards, bill-heads, small blanks, Ac., as well as a 
$600 press. We have been trying to find some 
fault with it, but cannot." 

Frotn John Geiger {Pub. Democratic Banner), 
Aledo, Ill.—"^\'e have found it in all respects 



satisfactory. The imjiression^can be exactly 

kl- 

lya,-eoniplisl 



adjust. 



d th. 



-wot 



k Aisily and rapic 



FnimJn/ni /I<ilcldi.ts ( Pub. Ii'nprese7itativej, Fox 
Lake, XVn.— " Jlavlng use<l your Press during 
the i)asl year, I take pleasure in stating that it 
is all that it claims to be. No fault can be found 
with it whatever. I could not 'keep olfice' 
without it." 

A. IV. HKL.T..O(iG, 
UO and lOl Wanhlngton St., Chicago, III.- 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



339 



ADVERTISE ! ADVERTISE ! ! ADVERTISE ! ! ! 



"The Inside Track" List 



TWO HlIiVDRED CHOICE WESTER:* 3IEWSPAPERS, lai 

COMPULSING 
Sixty ill Illisiois and about T^veiity in eacli of tlie otlier Western States. 



IXCH. 


'r" 1 




t^ 1 

2 2 

H 3 


tH 1 




'^ 4 


RATES FOR THE WHOI.E I.IST. 


S 3 


1-2 


Tliese are the riOwest Rates yet offered to tlie Public for the 


? 


4 
^ 5 




>■ 8 
■^ 9 


same ^V'ork. 


5 8 


W 6 




«10 




:? 9 


i 7 




II2 


Ordinuiy advertisements, Two Dollars per Line of space of Agate 


bio 


< 8 




«13 


type. 


E|i 


« 9 


1 


U 
15 
16 


Notices in Nonpareil type, before Markets, Tbree Dollars per line. 


t^ 12 

J 13 


^10 




Notices in reading matter, Four Dollars per Line of space of Brevier 


^14 


^11 




17 


type. 


315 


^ 13 




18 


Scales of these sizes of type will be found at either side of this column. 


^^KJ 


K ig 




20 


About nine words of Agate make a line, and fourteen lines make an 


17 

IS 
19 
'20 


1 A 


1-2 


21 


inch. About seven words of Brevier make a line, and about nine lines 


14 




22 
23 
24 


make an inch. 


15 




On large or i)eiinancnt advertisements a liberal discount ft-om these 


•21 


16 




25 


rates will be allowi'd. 


22 


17 




26 

27 


;efS~A<Iviitisrmiiits can be alternated, if desired; that is, published 


23 


18 


'i 


every allciuatc week, without greater charge than for the same num- 


24 


19 




29 
30 
31 
32 
33 


ber of continuous, insertions. 


26 

27 


20 
21 




Advantages of the "Inside Track'' I,ist. 


28 
2!) 


22 


1-2 


34 
35 
36 


We claim, and we think we can fairly substantiate our position, ten 


30 


23 




points of superiority for our plan of central advertising. 


31 


24 




37 


ISt-THE PROMINENCE OF THE ADVERTISEjVIENT. 


32 
33 


25 




38 
39 


2d— FREEDOM FROM ERRORS. 


34 


26 




40 


3d-NEATNESS OF TYPOGRAPHY. 


35 


27 


3 


41 

42 


4th-CLEARNESS OF PRESS-WORK. 


36 
37 


28 




43 


5th-THE RESPECTABILITY OF ADJOINING ADVERTISEMENTS. 


38 


29 




44 
45 


Oth-ONLY TWO CUTS WANTED, INSTEAD OF TWO HUNDRED. 


39 


30 




46 
47 
48 


7th-SAVING IN CORRESPONDENCE. 
8th-PROMPTNESS OF EXECUTION. 


40 
41 
42 


31 
32 




49 
50 

51 
52 


9th-CERTAINTY OF EXECUTION. 


43 


33 




lOth-THE IMMENSE SAVING IN COST. 


44 
45 
46 
47 


34 
35 




53 
54 




36 


4 


55 


Advertisers will please bear in mind that— 


48 


37 




56 




49 


38 




57 
58 


«S- The ACCURACY of all Advertisements is GUARANTEED. 


50 
51 


39 




59 
60 




52 


40 


1-2 


61 
62 
63 


4^ Disreputable Advertisements NOT RECEIVED at any price. 


53 
54 
55 


41 
42 




64 




56 


43 




65 


SSB- We make ISO EXTRA CHARGE for the insertion of CUTS. 


57 


44 




66 
67 




59 


45 


5 — 


68 

70 
71 


Jm- Complete flies AX W AYS OPEN TO INSPECTION at this 
Office. 


60 
61 
62 


46 
47 

48 




72 
73 




63 
64 


49 




74 


m- NO ORDERS can be received FOR A FRACTION OF THE 


65 


50 


,.a 


75 
76 


LIST. 


m 


51 




77 
78 




67 

68 


52 




79 
80 


m- Only TWO CUTS or ELECTROTYPES are needed for the 




53 
54 




81 


ENTIRE EIST. 




6 — 


82 




72 


55 



Terms of payment, Cash with the order. Address 

A. N. KEEEOGG, 99 and lOl Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

J|»- Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co., are our authorized Agents for this List. 



340 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

Ceo. C. Newman $c Co., Poultney, Vt., 

I'lliLlSIlKUS OF TIIK 
POl LT.^'KY (Vt.) BI I.I.KTi:V, nncl «RAX> II^LK (IV. Y.) HEPORTER. 

FAVORABLK TKUMS ON AnVKllTISHMKNTS TO BK INsr:ilTf:D IN' BOTH PAPERS. 
4^Trniisieiit ndvoitlsing payable i» advance. 



The Temperance Standard. 

A WEEia>Y PAPEK I»K\(>TE1) To TEMPERANCE AND THE HOME CIRCLE. 

Pi Itl.IMIKl) AT Kl.OD.MINGTON, ILLINOIS, I!Y 

J. W. AICIIOI.S, at SI SO Per Annum. 

Bona-fide circulation two lliou.siiml ami rapidly increasing. The best Advertising 
Medium in Central Illinois. 

NO PATENT MEDICINE OR LOTTERY ADVERTISEMENTS INSERTED. 



The Otsego Business Index. 

A .>IOA'THI.Y PAPER l>EVOTKn TO AltVERTISIIVG. 

THE BEST .ADVERTISING MEDU'M IN WESTERN MICHIO.VN. CIRCULATION FREE. 





RATES OF AIJVKKTISIX; : 


1 page, 

Double column, 
1 column, 

NOTICKS IN M..\ 


$20 l--.> column, - - - $3 00 
10 I-l ■' • - - 2 00 
.^> 1 inch or loss (adv't), - - ."iO 
o:n<; (oi.cmns. io cem's i'EK li>e, each iNSEinioN. 




REII> &. EI>.SEE1,. 



"THE BEST ADVERTISIIV<; 3IE1HI .n l\ AE^V EiVCtAJITD." 

The Household 

IS A PRACTICAL JOURNAL, ESPE( I ALLY DEVOTED To THE INTERESTS OF 
THE AMERK'AX IIOl SEWIFE. 

Its departments include tlio VcniiKlu, llir DniwiiiLr Room, the Dressing Room, the Library, 
the Conservatory, the Nursery, till' Dispcns.ny, the kilchcn, the Dining Room and the Parlor, 
containing articles by experienced HousckccfHus upon all mattei's pei-taining to Home Life and 
Domestic Economy. 

AdirertisinjB^ Rates: i.'i cents a line each insertion ; cuts and business notices double rates. 

Send stamj) for siiecimen copy. <>EO. E. CROWEEE, Brattleboro', Vt. 

Daily $t Weekly North Missouri Courier 

\VIA'<1IEEI.. i:RI:KT, harsh &, CO., Piil>H>sli»rs, Ilaunibnl, Mo. 

The only Daily in North Missouri cast of .St. .losoph. Weekly circulates in every county in the 
Slate. Population of Hannibal \2,WM. No other daily paper in city. 
RATES OF AI»VERTISIi\<i IX THE OAII.V OR WEEKLY COITRIER : 



1 column, 1-2 montlis, $1 

1 " (i " 

I " :f '■ :>K It ••(!•• 40 



12 



■J colnnin, .". nuinths, $.'>.5 

-1 ■• 12 '■ Ki 



I-l • .S 



The Vienna Artery 

IIY WRKaiT .t < <>.. ICditf.iM and Propiit-lor.'*. 

»7/;.V.V.f, .l(>Jl.\S(>.\ COl XTY, ILL. 

.\dvertiMliiK RatrH : 

1 column, I year, • )>''.0 | 1-2 column, 1 year, - $.{,"1 | 1-t column, 1 year, - $30 

P* AKVEUTi.ti.NG AiiENTS: One coluiiiu inserted in 100 papers in the West, for one year, each 

paper, $.'>0; 1-2 colunm, 1 year, $2.'>; 1-4 column, 1 year, $12 50. Terms cash. 

WTllGHT A CO. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BdOK. 341 

Savannah Republican. 

I>AIIiT AIVD TVEEKliT. 
PUBIilSHEO AT SAVAJVIVAH, GEORGIA, BY J. R. SIVEED. 



The general circulation of the Republican is equal to that of any other paper in the Southern 

States. It is devoted chiefly to News and Commerce, and is largely taken by 
the Merchants of the South, especially in the States of Georgia, Ala- 
bama and Florida, and for this reason is a desirable pa- 
per to Advertisers in every branch of trade. 

For terms of advertising, apply to any leading News Agent in the United States. 

Subscriptions : 

Daily, $10 Per Annum, Weekly, $3 Per Annum. 

The American Union. 

A STAIWDARD RADICAIi REPUBI^ICAIV IVEWSPAPER. 

Offifial Organ of the State and U. S. Government. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT MACON, GEORGIA. 

It is in the centre of the great Cotton region of the South, and, from its being the only paper 
that dares advocate Republican doctrines in the State, has a large general circulation (1,400 
copies.) It thus offers superior advantages to advertisers. 

RATES OF AnVERTISnVG : 



One insertion per line (nine words, - 10 cents 

One month, " - - - 25 

Two months, " .... 40 

Three months, " - - - - .50 



Six months, v.") cents 

One year, $i 

Special Notices per line, each time, 1.5 " 

Editorial Notices, per line, each time, 25 " 



Lines are counted by measurement in case of display or blank space 

J. CLARKE SWATZE, Publisber, Macon, Ga. 



LittelPs Living Age 

ON JANUARY 1, 1869, ENTERED UPON ITS ONE HUNDREDTH VOLUME. 
It IS a weekly magazine, published every Saturday, giving 64 pages a week, or more than 
tliree thousand double-column octavo pages of reading matter yearly. It contains the best 
Reviews, Criticisms, Tales, Fugitive Poetry, Scientific, Biogi-aphical, Historical and Political In- 
formation, gathered from the entire body of English Periodical Literature, and forming four 
handsome volumes, every year, of immediate interest and solid, permanent value. The I^ivine 
Age circulates among people of property and intelligence, people of cultivated literary taste, 
and ot suflicient means to gratify that taste, and people of enterprise, standing and influence in 
their respective communities throughout the countiw, and is carefully preserved after being 
read. For this reason, and because of the very limited space allowed in each number to adver- 
tisers, the liiving Age is unequaled, for the cost, as a medium for advertising New Publications, 
whether ot a literai-y, professional, scientific, educational or religious character; Reviews, Maga- 
«»es and Papers intended for wide circulation ; Colleges, Seminaries and Schools ; Works of Art : 
Pianos, Melodeons and Church and Parlor Organs; Sewing Machines and valuable Inventions, 
llanutactures. Merchandise and articles of various sorts— whatever, in short, is of interest to the 
class of readers above mentioned. Subscription $8 a year, for which the magazine is sent, post- 
paid. For further particulars, address LITTELL & GAY, Publishers, 30 Broomfleld St., Boston. 

A MVE PAPER FOR ADVERTISERS. 

Southern Home Circle $c Literary Cem. 

An illustrat od monthly Literary .lounial. Claims the largest general circulation of any paper 
published 111 Jlissouri. Has a larger circulation than the combined circulation of Ave weekly pa- 
pers published m the same county. Circulates extensively in every State and Territory. The only 
paper published at Centialia, the junction of the North Missouri and Columbia Branch Railroads 
m Boone county, the most wealthy and populous county in North Missouri. The Home Circle 
IS considered the vei-j- best advertising medium in the West and South. The organ of no sect or 
party, it goes to all classes without regard to politics. Publishers will find the Home Circle a 
most valuable medium for the introduction of New Books, Music, Ac. All Books, Music, &c , 
■ent to this oflice will be carefully and impartially reviewed, and in addition will be advertised 
in our columns free. 

Advertising Rates ; 15 cents per Nonpareil line, each insertion; one square, 12 lines, one in- 
•ertion, $150; 3 months, $3; 6 months, $5; 12 months, $8; 1-4 column, 1 year, $(5; 1-2 column, 1 
year, $10; 1 column, 1 year, $10; advertisements on first page, 25 cents per line; Special Notices, 
J6 cents per line. No extra charge for cuts. Address all communications to 

A. ROI»EMYER, Publisher, Centralla, Micsouri. 



343 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



BATAVIA >VJEEKr,Y IVKWS, 

HATAVIA, lUI.. 

l£OOF & LKWIS, PkoI'KIICTOU.S. 

Advertising Rates : 

1 year— 1 8q . *10, 14 col . $:». 1--2 ool . ^'V), 1 col. »100. 
COVRIKR XXD TREE^IXUS, 

P()T.S1)AM. ST. LAWRENCE COUNTY, N. Y. 

Only paper in :5(1 Assembly Di.strict. Circulation 
2,000. Advertisinfi rates: $!)0 per colinnn; $.30 
for 1-2 column. 
ELLIOT FAY, Propr ietor. 

THK IVATIOlVAIi DEMOCRAT, 



CASSOPOLIS, MICH. 

Largest circulation, most reading matter, best 

paper for advertisers in the country. 

THE WAYIVESBURG REPOSITORY, 

WAVNESIJUKG, GREENE CO., PA. 



THE TirTOA TIME.S. 

TIITON, INDIANA. 



ONLY PAPKll IN THE COUNTY. 
A I) V E R T I .S T X O K A T E .S REASONABLE 



92 a year in advance. Devoted to local news. 
Has a solid circulation. 



THE FRAIVKLIIV (IJVD.) JEFEERSOIVIAIV 

I.S A LARGE EIGHT COLU.MN I'ATER. 

Has an extended circulation and is an excellent 
medium for advertisers. 

H. C. ALLISON, Proprietor. 

JAY AiVI> ADAMS REPrBLiICAHT, 

PORTLAND, JAY CO., IND. 

JOSEPH H. JONES, Publisher. 
Terms of Advertising: 1 column, 1 year, $50. 



THE IOWA VOTER. 

The only Republican paper published at Knox- 
ville, the county seat of Marion Co., Iowa. Circu- 
lation 1,020, and steadily increasing. Sample 
Nos. free on application." 

SPERHY & RARKKR, Publishers. 



THE I- rSHKIlrt, JOURiVAI.. 

A Large Eiiair Coumn Folio Family Paper. 
Fislikill, I>utcUea.s Co., iV. \'. 

As an advertisinij medium, it is surpassed by 
few paper.s aloui^ilic Hudson. 

G. \V. (>\VI;N, Kdili.rand Publi.sliei-. 

MISSISSIAEWA 3IO]¥ITOR, 
One of tlie l.nr;;f.st and Best Country Pa- 
pers in the West. 

Terms— $3 per annum - - - - in advance. 
JENNINGS & BRO.. Prop'rs, 
Marion, Ind. 



WEST POIIVT SHIELD, 

wr.fiT POINT, GA. 

LEADING WEEKLY IN WESTERN GEORGIA. 

Advertising Rates— $1 per square first and 
50 cents sub.sequent insertions. 

FRIARS POIiVT HVKESll.Y DEI^TA. 

Oi'FiciAL I'AiKi: OK Coahoma and Tunica 

Coi-NTir.s, MiN>issiri'i. 

Rates of Advtrtisinjj : 1 square (10 lines), 1 

time, $1; G mos, $10; 1 year, $15; 1 col., 1 time, 

$30; I col., 1 year, $100. 

R. J. ALCARN, Editor. 



MIA.lIISBlTR<i Bl LLETIiV. 

Established isiJT. Blossom I'.uos., Editors and 
Prop's. .\ live, independent newspaper and val- 
uable advertising medium to all desiring com- 
munication with tlie people of Miami Valley. 

Addr ess Lock Box \11. _ 

THE I.ITTLE MISSOIKIAIV. 

Devoted toTemjieraiu'e, Morality and Humor. 
Publisli..,! every oilier Tlmrsday, at .-)0c. a year. 
Splendid ;mI\ n t isiiiL; iiieilimii. Kales : 5e. aline; 
yearly a.l veil i-ements di-ieoiint of-J.-.e. Address 
.JNJ^). N. Ill K iii>oN, KdiKir. otterville. Mo. 

i\i»I':pi:\ 

Six column pajper, 
dent inallthiiii^s. (;ii( 
Circulation rapidly in 

tlsing: lOe. per line; $-,:, per i-olunin for 1 vear. 
Proper diseoiinis lo agents. .»>. s. ULooM,"Pro-| 
prl(!tor, Sh<-ll>\ , < (liio. i 

THK EI.I»i;UTO.\ <;azette, 

Publishcl weekly at Klherlon, (ia. Is loealed ' 
in one of the weallhie>l ami best eotloii I'aising 
porlions of the .Slate of Gil. II has a large and 
rapidly inereasing einulalion, and oilers supe- 
rior indueenienls as an udNerlisin-i medium in 
the country. S. N ('auii.mi.u. i;dilor»"t Prop'r. , 

THE SOITH-Wr.ST ICEWS, I 

llARTMI.I.r,, .Mo. 
Siil>Hrrl|ition. $1 ."»<► I»er Year. ! 



V-.ST .\'EWS. 

I enlarging. Indepen- 
ating among all classes, 
•asing, Uatesof adver- 



>f11i 



lat< 



pa). 



ili.'s Th 
ve>l Miss< 
SON, I'lihl 



miles, and eireu- 
best advertising 



THE 3III.TOAI.1X, 

MILTON, PA. 

BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUxM IN NORTH- 
UMBERLAND COUNTY. 
Advertising Rates given on application. 

wit.Mi:vfiTo:v i>aiey commerciai.. 

A State Paper. 

Organ oi tke business interests of Delaware. 

JENKINS & ATKINSON, Proprietors. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Farmers' and Peacli Grower.s' Paper. 

THE DEtiAWARE (Weekly) TRIBrnfE. 

Published at Wilmington, Del., by 

JENKINS & -VTKINSON, 

Editors and Proprietors. 

THE MARYVII.T.E KKPIBl.KAA, 

Pul)lislie,l al Maryville, I'.loiini Co., Kasl Tenn. 
Siih^i-riiitioii, ^-J )HM' \-ear : six niDntlis. ^1. Ad- 
verlisiiig Kales: I m|', I iii-erlioii, if I : each ad- 
ditional insertion, ..n ri- (,,-,.. I'. Kowell \', Co., 
are our aulliori/.e.l \j: r,i~ i.-illie iniied States. 
.Vddre.ss W. U. .s, oi i a t ,, , Maryville, Iv Tenn. 

THE 1,1:K.V>'<>.-V JOI KIVAl,, 

Lebanon, - st. Ci.aii; ( oi npv, - Illinois, 
Is one of the besi ;ul\ cili-^ing m(>diums in the 
county. Issued oiiee a week, and commends 
itseirio tlie hiisiiiess public as a I'amilv paper. 
Terms of Adverlisiii;;-: l(»e<'nls per lincl: yearly 
contracts maile. 11. II Simmons, Eil. and Prop'r. 

PA«E COl IVTY DEMOCRAT, 

Clarinda. Iowa. 
r)i>voted lothe interest uf South-western Iowa. 

Ai)\ r.itrisisi, Kates: 
One dollar per sfjiia re, of l()lin<'s, eaeli insertion. 
N. c, KIDKNOWK. Editor and Proprietor. 
Tino <JAZETTE, 
Published weekly, al Corning. AdamsCo., Iowa. 
A. I.. Wei.i.s, Piil.li.^lier. Ollieial paper of the 
County. Cireulat ion Toil. Rale,sol' Advertising: 
1 s(|uare, I inseilicn. ?sl : each additional inser- 
tion, .M) eenis; 1 s(|., :; mo., $."i ; i; mo., ST; I .year, 
ifio; 1-1 col., 1 vr. $ii: 1-2 col., I vr,^li): leoi,$7.=>. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 848 



Peabody's Fireside Favorite- 

A MONTHLY 

WITH A CfRCULATION GREATER THAN THAT OF ANY FOUR WEEKLY PAPERS 
IX ESSEX COUNTY. 

at enters upon its third year, .lanuary, 1870, with a liyt of Advertisers who have tried it, and be- 
lieve it unsurpassed as an Advertising medium. 

ALL ORDERS, TO SECURE INSERTION, SHOULD REACH US BEFORE THE 25TH INST. 
4^ ADVEKTISEME><TS OF AN EMPIRICAI, XATLIJE NOT ADMITTED. ,©8' 



Advertisings Rates : 

One-quarter colunm, each insertion, - - - $8 00 

One-half >i .. ^ . . . - 15 00 

One u .; u . . . 23 00 

Notices on Second Page, per line. - - - - 25 



Geo. P. RowELL & Co., New York, are our Agents, and a file of our paper can b« s 
at their office. Address 

FIRESIDE FAVORITE, 

* Salem, >lassacliusett*. 



Elliott^Thomes$tTalbofs Publications. 

THE FLAG OF OFR F^'IOIV. 

A LARiE, SIXTEEN-PAGE LITERARY JOURNAL. 

$4 A YEAR. 

Rates for Advertising : 

Forty centa a line, each insertion : twenty per cent, discount for four insertions and over. 



THE AMERICAIV UiVIOJV. 

THE LARGEST FOLIO LITERARY' PAPER IN AMERICA, 
riLLBD WITH CAPITAL STOIilES, POEMS, ANECDOTES AND GENERAL MISCELLANY. 
NO ADVERTISEMENTS. 
Two Dollars and Flity Cents a Year; Six Cents Single. 

BAXEOl'S M:OIVTHt,Y :»f AGAZI!VE. 

THE CHEAPEST MAGAZINE IN THE WORLD. 

A One Hundred-Page Illustrated Monthly Publication for Fifteen i^euts Per Copy ; 

$1 50 a Year; Thirteen Copies, $15. 

ADVERTISEMENTS ON COVER PAGES, SI ,50 PER LINE. 

Circulation, 78,280 Copies Monthly S 

> 

THE M O IV T H E Y iV O V E E E T T E . 

A LARGE ILLUSTRATED QUARTO. 

Two Dollars a Y'ear 5 Four Copies, Six Dollars ; Twenty Cents Single. 

All the above publications ai-e for sale by Book and Newsdealers throughout the country, or 
onaiied to subscribers, regulai-ly, upon receipt of price, by 

EEEIOTT, THOMES <fc TAEBOT, Publishers, 

Boston, Massachusett*. 



344 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 

Weekly Ralls Co. Record, 

XlL.^^^ jLo.\i>o.\, .nissoriti. 

Circulation a,."»00 copies per week. Advertiaemcuts set in any style to suit, with cuts, (lis 
play type, and any other attractions the ailvertiscr may desire. 
KATES OF AI>\"ERTISIX« : 



1 square, 3 months, ■ S" 

1 " tj " - U) 

1 " 13 " - ir. 

2 " 8 " - 10 
2 " •: . " - H 
2 •' 12 " - 20 



3 squares, (> niontlis, - $18 I 1-4 column, 12 months, 
:i " 12 •' - 28 1-2 " 3 

4 " :i " - 14 I 1-2 " 6 



4 " 'i •• - 21 I 1-2 " 12 

all 



12 •' - 32 I 1 " 3 



-4 column 3 " - 15 I 1 

•' - 2«|l 



1-4 " 

Twenty-five per cent, additional for Special Noticos. T.ocal, or Editorial Notices, 10 cent* 
per line. BODGE & .11 A V:iAI.I>. i:ditorH and Publishers. 

.\t\v I.oii<loi», Itnlls County, Missouri. 

P. S.— Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co. arc our authorized A^'ints, and lieep files of the paper 
at their house m New York, to which advertisers can refer at any time. 



The St. Joseph Co. Republican. 

Ol' FltlAL, P.APEU OF THE COl'A'TY. 
The only paper publislxed at Ceutro-ille, tlie County Seat of St. Joseph County. 

SPECIALLY DEVOTED TO LOCAL, FOREIGN ^IND POLITICAL NEWS. 

Teums: $2 Pek Annum, Invariably in Advance. 

BATES OF AI>VERTISI3fG (One inch of space constitutes a square): 

1 w. 2 w. 3 w. 1 mo. 3 mo. 
1-4 column, $3 50 |4 00 $4 .iO $5 00 ^10 00 
1-2 column, 5 50 7 00 8 00 9 00 15 OO 

Local and editorial notices 10 cents per line. 
A<lvertisenient8 not accompanied with directions as to time will be inserted until forbidden, 
and (diarged accordingly. Transient advertisements must be prepaid. Advertising Agents will- 
be allowed a commission of twenty-live per cent. 

H. EGABBOAI> ifc CO.. Publishers, 

Ceutreville, St. Joseph Co., Mich. 



1 w. 


2 w. 


3 w. 


1 mo. 


3 mo. 


1 square, $1 00 


$1 25 


$1 50 


$1 75 


$3 00 


3 squares, 1 75 


2 .50 


3 00 


3.50 


fi 00 


1-8 colunm, 2 75 


3 75 


4 25 


4 50 


8 00 



The National Guard. 

THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST ADVEltTISING MEDIUMS IN NOllTIIEUN ILLIKOIS. 

Has a large circulation in one of the largest counties iu the State. 

Published Weekly, by ED. T. RITCHIE, 

OREGON, ILLINOIS, AT TWO DOLLARS PER YEAR. 

It circulates weekly among some of the wealthiest farmers in the Northwest. Its columns- 
are penised every week by large numbers of first-class mechanics. It is read by live men. It 
is spicy, racy, and full of " vim." 

RATES OF ADVERTISING: 

1 square (10 lines 1 inch), 1 insertion, - #1 1 I s.inarc (10 lines 1 incli). C" months, - $10 

1 " " 1 " 1 month. - - 3 1 •■ •' 1 " I year. - - !•• 

1 " ''1 " 3 '• - - fi I Payadi.e IX Ai)VANCi:. 

NO Dis(()( NTS fro:m these u.vtes in any c.\se. 

OLDEST PAPER A-AD I.Alt4;j:ST CIH« ri..VTIO.V I.\ THE COl.-NTr. 

Stevenson New Era. 

the new era visits at.m<»t i:\i;kv meuch.vnt in noriti alai5.\.ma; goes to 
over one lu ndred po.st offices. 

Circulating in se>iions not frerinently visited bv others, it possesses rare advantages as an 
advertising niedimn 11 will be cnhirged at an early day. Shall of course bo pleased to hear 
from you. 

T.-ruis of Sultsrriptloii : 

Per Annum, .f 2 (KH Three Months. 75 ct«. 

Six Months, ... - I (X) I Im-ariiihhj in Adrance. 

Qiuirter column, 1 uioiilli, #10 ii') 

" " 3 " 20 01) 

" (! " 30 00 

12 " +5 00 



KATES OF ADVERTISIIVG 

ilf I'ohimn, 1 month, $15 00 
3 " ;',.-i (K» 

C •' ,50 (H) 

12 " ,'<0 00 



Business Cards, not to e.vceed two (2) inclies, per year, #15. 



iliiinn, I month, ?2.5 0(V 
3 '• 50 00 



12 '• 125 OO 
he above are ("ash TCntea. 



OSnOR:VE &, CKAWFORD. Proprlrtora. .SteveUHon, 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. S45 

Cortland Weekly Journal, 

PUBLISHED EVEUY THURSDAY MORNING, AT (^RTLAND VILLAGE, NEW YORK, 
BY WILililAM H. LIVEBMOBE, Editor and Proprietor. 

TERMS. — The Jowriial will be sent to Village and Mail Subscribers every Thursday morning' 
at Two Dollars per year, strictly in advance. 

The Cortland VVeekly Journal, in its political discussions and preferences, is Republican, 
and will support the cardinal principles and leading measures of that party as on the whole best 
calculated to secure the peace and promote the prosperity of all sections of our common coun- 
try. In its Commercial, Financial, Real Estate, Local ami Market Reports, special pains will be 
taken to embody the latest news, in the mo.st ri'lialjh' and acceptable form. Its Literary Depart- 
ment will contain from eight to twelve columns cii iniir. sting literary matter, selected with 
great care ft-om the best periodical literature in t Im' cmintry, and not calculated to deprave the 
morals or lower the taste of the great body of inuUigcut readers. Its circulation now numbers 
2.000 copies weekly, and, as it is rapidly increasing, is certainly the best advertising medium in 
Central New Yol'k. 

Bates of Advertising : 
Twelve lines of Nonpariel type {or one inch of space) make one square. 



I w. 2 w. 3 w. 1 m. 3 m. 6 m. 12 m. 
1-4 col., $.5 00 $6 50 $7 00 $8 00 $15 00 |20 00 $40 OO 
1-3 col., (!00 7 50 8 00 9 00 20 00 25 00 50 00 
1-2 col., 8 00 10 00 11 00 12 00 2.5 00 45 00 60 00 
3-4 col., 12 00 15 00 17 00 20 00 35 00 50 00 80 00 
1 col., 15 00 20 00 25 00 30 00 50 00 65 00 100 00 



1 w. 2 w. 3 w. 1 m. 3 m. 6 m. 12 m. 
1 3q., $1 00 $1 50 $2 00 $3 00 $5 00 $10 00 $15 00 
2sq., 175 2 50 3 00 4 00 7 00 12 00 20 00 

3sq., 2 50 3 50 4 00 5 00 9 00 13 00 25 00 

4sq., 3 25 4 50 5 00 6 00 1100 15 00 30 00 

S sq., 4 00 5 50 (5 00 7 00 13 00 17 00 :« 00 

Business Cards, $5 a year, four changes allowed. 
Business JVotices in editorial columns, copy furnished, ten cents per line first insertion, five 
cents per line for each subsequent insertion. 

licgal Advertisements, seventj'-flve cents per folio for first insertion, and fifty cents per 
folio for every subsequent insertion. 

OUB Pt,AI]V AIVD OBrVAMElVTAri JOB PBIIVTIIVG ESTABLISHMEIVT. 
Being well supplied with new and modern .styles of Type, Presses, &c., we are now prepared to 
execute with >featness, Accuracv and Dispatch, 

LA\V cases and points, BLANKS, 
CARDS, DRAFTS, 

PAMPHLETS, NOTES, 

POSTERS, RECEIPTS, 

WAYBILLS, LETTER HEADS, 

LABELS, BILL HEADS, 

PROGRAMMES, CATALOGUES, 

CHECKS, INVITATIONS, 

And every other variety of Plain and Colored Printing in a workmanlike manner, and on reason- 
able terms. Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 



The Industrial American. 

A SEMI-MOIVTHLY JOTJBIVAI,. 

DEVOTED TO THK PROMOTION OF AMERICAN INDUSTRY. 
PtTBIilSHED BY E. YOTj::V«'S SO:v & CO., - 34 AIVN STBEET, NEIIV TOBK^ 

AT TWO DOLLARS PKR ANNUM IN ADVANCE. 



.Advocating protection to American interests, it commends itself to manufacturers and tho«« 
desirous of rendering this country independent of foreign productions. 

It is the paper, at present, devoted exclusively to these aims, and, besides possessing the ad- 
vantage of a large regular circulation, 3,000 copies per month are distributed gratuitously by 
the Industrial League of Pennsylvania, making it a desirable medium for advertisers. 



Kates of Advertising t 

Oneinchforl month. - - $4 00 I Two inches for 1 year, - - $60 00 

" " " .3 " . . 10 00 I 3-4 " " 6 months, - - 26 00 

" " 6 " - - 18 00 I 13-4 •' " 1 year - - 50 OO 

" " 12 " - - 30 00 3 1-2 u u 1 .. . . 100 00 

Two " " 3 .< . . 18 00 4 .. .. 1 .. . . 120 00 

" " " 6 " - 30 00 8 .. .. 1 .< . . 3og qO 



o4^ AMERICAN NEWSPAPER EATE-BOOK. 



1 w. 2 \v. 


1 111. 


.{ m. 


li ni. 


1 year. 




1 inch, $l(Kt $lo() 


$2 ryi 


$.-. 00 


»!S(KI 


$12 00 


1-4 col 


2 inches. 2 00 :j ()0 


4(K) 


8 00 


1:5 00 


20 00 




3 inches, 2 50 4 00 


GOO 


12 00 


18 00 


■>r, 00 


icol.. 



The North Carolinian. 

p. JOIIA', l>ut)lisUer, Klizabeth <ity, A'. C. 

The largest and i.k\i)IN(; I'omtkai,, Educatioxal and Agkicultlrai. PArKU in the State. 

AI>VERTISI\'G RATES : 

'. 2 w. 1 ni. ;lni. 6 m. 1 year. 

1-4 col., $.-)fHl $7 00 $!»00 $1,5 00 $20 00 $30 00 

i(i 12 00 l.'i 00 2.') 00 35 00 00 00 

10 00 20 00 :»00 00 00 100 00 

The Republican Pioneer. 

PUBLl.SHEI) WKKKI.V AT KDtJAKD. sT. JOHN TIIK HAl'Tl^T P.VUI^H, LOUISIA^'A. 

A flrst-cla.'iij life couutrv iicw.spaiuT, dcvDrtd to I'olitio. News, ( ivilization, and General 

Improveuicnl" OKFICIAI. .TOIKNA L of the siat^ of Louisiana and the 

Parishes of .^t. Jolm tli.> P,aiiti-t mmI .•<t. Charles. 

ADVERTISI\<; KVTi:.S: 

One sqr. (10 lines agate) one in.sertion, - $1 ."lO i one coluinii one insertion, - - - $;i2 00 

■One sqr. one month. :; :>u om- coluinn one month, - - • 100 00 

One sqr. one year. 2o (jo | Oiu- colunm one year, - - • - 400 00 

A liberal discount to tho.se who advertise larj^ely. MORTIMER F. S.niTII, Proprietor. 
Geo. P. KowELL & Co., General Advertisiiifjr Agents. 

The Orford Weekly Leader. 

THE SPICIEST AN1> lilVEtilEST PAPER liV IOWA. 

PUBLISHED AT OUKORn, IOWA, BY W. M. PATRICK, Editor. 

The circulation of the Leader is larger than that of any other paper in the county, because 
it is the best, tlie most enterprising, and makes Local News a speciality. 
ADVERTISEMEXT.S .SET WITH A VIEW TO ATTRACTIVENESS. 
Rate* of Ad-rertisiiig : $."> per annum per inch. Local Notices 10 cents per line each inser- 
tion. Paj-ment quartely in advance. No <leviation from the above. 

Perley's Trades Gazette 

IS PI BLISIIKl) SIMI^LTANEOrSLY AT 
I>a\vrei»«c and Ciloucestrr, ICssex County, MassacIiusettB. 

Press Office, Peabody, September, 1««9. 
This ecrtilies that we print 7,500 copies of Pkkley'S Trades Gazette every month, and that 
we believe it to be faithfully distributed. CHAS. 1). HOWARD & CO., Publishers. 

Tei-ni8 of Advertisements : 1 column, $25: 1-2 column, $15: 1-4 column, $8: 1-9 column, or 
rard, 1^5. Advertisements, to secure iMimediiit^ imblication, must be receiveil by the 1st of th« 
month. Address all {communications : 

M. V. B. PERIvEY, T.a>»-rence, Mas*. 

The West Alabamian. 

PrBLISllKD .\1' ( AKItoi.I.ToN, ALAP.A.MA. NK.VRTIIK T( )M I!I(;P.F.i; KIVKU AND MOBILE 

\ OHIO i:.\ii,i{o.\i). cii{( n.ATioN ovf.k one thoi sand. 

IIEXRV &, <ai.,BKltT, IM'opiietort*. 

TerniH of Subserliitloii.— For oii<> year, si lictl v in advance. Three Dollars. 

It.VTES OF" AI>^i:ilTISl.\<; : 

One square (I inch) one insertion, $150. Business Cards. 3 months, $7; C months, $10; 13 
months, $15. For 1-1 eoluinii, :! months, $2.5; (i months, i-l'i; 12 months, $.50. For 1-2 column, 3 
months, $35; (I months, $.')0: 12 months, $70. For one column, 3 months, $.'i0; months $70; I'i 
Tnontlis. $in<i. Advert isements mt/.s/ /«' ;>fnV/ t;i af/rrtnc*>. We will not imblish without the money 
•aceoniijanies tlie ordi-r. 

The East Tennessee Union Flag. 

A \\i;i;ki.v ni.w .sp.\pi;i;, pr!;i,isiii:i> .\'r 

Jc>n«Klioro\ V.nst T4 iin., by 
CiEORi^E EI»<;AR <;RISIIAM (TenncNSCc State Printer). 

IT IS THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL FOR TENNESSEE AND THE UNITED STATES. 

TtmM tbe Uargeat Circulation of any Paper in 1'pper East Tennessee— An JBxccllcnt 

AdvertiNin^ Medium. Try It. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



347 



•' o:viiT MORrviiv<s daily IIV tol,ki>o." 

The Toledo Commercial, 

OAILV. TRI-WEEKtiT A1V1> WEEKLY. 

T O L P: D O, OHIO. 



Wliat is said of The Toledo Daily Commeh- 
-CiAL since its recent enlargement unrt im- 
provement : 

" The Commercial is decidedly the best daily 
published in Toledo."— P«(7io77i County (Ohio) 
Sentinel. 

"The Toledo Co.mmercial is now one of the 
largest dailies in the State, and one of the best.'' 
—Saiulusky Daily Register. 

" We considerthe Commercial one of the most 
ably conducted papers in the West, therefore de- 
serving of its \}r osperity."— Perry sbtirg Journal. 

"It is now as large as the average of Ohio 
dailies, and head and shoulders.above many of 
them in point of real worth as a newspaper."— 
Wauseon Republican. 

" We consider it one of the best ((Cicspajicrsin 
'Oh.io."—2fonoalk Reflector. 



" The Commercial embodies all that goes to 
make up a first-class reliable paper. We wish it 
abundant success." — Ligonier (Ind.) Republican. 



Rates of Advertlsius s 

For each square of 3-4 inch space in column. 

I 



One day, 
Two days, 
Throe days, 
Four days. 
Five days, 
One week, 
Ten days. 
Two weeks. 



D. 

$ .50 

.90 

1 2.5 

1 ,50 

1 75 

2 00 

2 70 

3 00 



D. 

$4 00 

5 on 

6 75 
2 months, 8 00 

10 00 
15 00 
20 00 
25 00 



3 weeks, 

4 weeks. 



... I 3 months 
75 I G 



months, 
..19 months, 
25 I 1 year. 



W. 

$1 75 

2 J5 

3 25 

4 25 
6 00 
9 00 

12 00 
15 00 



Special Notices, 25 per cent, additional. 

Editorials calling attention to advertisements, 
or matter for the benefit of private interests, 20 
cents per line. 

Local Notices in Daily, 10 cents per line for 
first insertion and 5 cents for each additional 
consecutive insertion. In Weekly, 15 cents per 
line for first insertion and 10 cents for each ad- 
ditional consecutive insertion. 

E. O. D. Advertisements, two-thirds rate. 

Twice a week, one-half price. 



Terms of Subscription t 

Daily, per year, $10; Tri-Weekly, per year, $5; 
Weekly, i^er year, |2. 

Choice Circulation, Living Rates, and a Liberal Policy toward Advertisers. 

THE COMMERCIAI,, Toledo, Ohio. 



Yolo Weekly Mail. 

I1VI»EPEIVI>EIVT IIV ALL THINGS; NEUTRAL IN JVOTHIBTG. 

THIS IS A SEVEN-COLUMN PAPER, 24x36. 
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSI>AY, AT >VOOI>LA]VI>, TOLO CO., CALIFORIVIA, 



The great agricultural centre of the Sacramento Valley. The richest and most productive 
wheat region in the State, if not in the world. "IVoodlaiid is a rising town of about two 
thousand inhabitants, Capital of the county, situated at a point on the California Pacific Rail- 
road, about sixteen miles West north-west ft-om the City of Sacramento : justly celebrated for its 
public and collegiate school facilities, work shops and beautiful residences. 

The Mail is the leading newspaper of this section ; has an extensive circulation among all 
classes in Yolo, adjoining counties, and throughout the State; more especially, however, with 
the substantial farming community. This fact will commend it to business men, not slow to 
detect and secure the best medium for communication and trade, with the best class of 
customers. 

Terms: Subscription Price, $5, Coin, per Annum, in Advance. 

Advertisiug^ Rates — IVet : 

(All advertisements set and displayed according to orders. Cuts, outside of ordinai-y, to be fur- 
nished by advertisers. Payments in U. S. (Join or its equivalent in Currency.) 
One inch space, 1 week, $2; 2 weeks, $3; 1 month, $4; 3 months $(5, 



Quarter column, 1 week, 
" " 1 month 



$10 


One column, 1 week, 


$20 


15 


1 month. 


.30 


20 


3 " 


35 


30 


" " G " 


50 


GO 


'• " 1 year. 


120 



$8 Half column, 1 week, 
10 " " 1 month 

3 " 15 '• '■ 3 

6 ■• 20 " " 6 

" 1 year, 40 " " l year. 

Special Notices per line, 1 time, 25 cents ; per line, per month, $1. 
For specimen copy of the Mail, always gratuitous, address, 

VYAGSTATF &, JONES, Publishers and Proprietors, 
Vl^'oodland, Yolo County, Calitornia. 

Or, personal inspection may be had by application at the Advertising Agency of Geo. P. 
ROWELL & Co., No. 40 Park Row,' New York City, our regularly authorized Agents. 



348 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK 



The People's Journal 

IS ISSUEU rUOM FIVK OFFKK.S, AS I.VOlt'ATKl* KKDOW. 

HAS A CIKCL'LATIOX OF OVKU 40.000 COI'IliS, 
WHICH EXTENDS TO EVERY STATE IN THE INION. 



ADVERTISIAii RATES j 



I cts. I One column, 1 mo. 
I cts. I Or 



)ne column, 3 luos., 



30 



One line, 1 mo., 
One line, 3 mus., 
Published by 

THE PEOPL,E'S PUBIilSHIXtt CO., 014 Arcli St., Phila., Pa.; 
130 Race Street, Cincinnati, Ohio ; l<t4 State Street, Cliicago, III.; 

.503 :X. Siitli St., St. I.oiii.s. >Io.; Hf-i Main St., Springfield, 3Ia«8. 



Sun^ Union and Journal^ 

«RAJVI> RAPIDS, l»IICHI<»Ai\'. 



THE BAIliT SriV, 
Circulation 2,UOO. 

Advertisements inserted for $1 per square (1 
inch), the first week, and 3C cents each week 
thereafter. 

R. A. MARVIN & CO., Publishers. 



[OH 



gra:xi> rapids i^abor rivi 

(Tri-AVeekly,) Circulation TOO. 

Advtn-ti.scmcnts inserted for $1 per square (1 
inch), the first week, and Vi cents each week 
thereafter. 

R. A. MARVIN & CO.. Publishers. 



I :v D r S T R I A I. J O U R IV A t, , 

■Weekly Circulation 4,000. 

Advertisements inserted for $1 per square (1 inch) the first week, and 25 cents each week 
thereafter. These papers arc published at Grand Rapids, Michigan, a city of 20,000 inhabitants 
and rapidly Slowing. They are published in the interests of the industrial classes, are rapidly 
increasing" in circulation, and are unquestionably the best ailvcrtising mediums in AVcsteru 
Michigan. R. A. MARVIA dt CO., Publishers. 



THE ONLY 



The Muncie Times, 

►.4 PER PI'BI^ISHED liV DELAWARE COFIVTY. INDIANA. 

Circulation Twelve Hundred. 



The Times is a large weekly paper, published in Muncie, a city of four thousand inhabitants, 

and the Capital of Delaware county, one of the best improved counties in the State, 

with a population of 20,000 and upwai-ds, and largely Republican in politics. 

Advertising Rates : 

One column, one year, $100; less than 1 coIutuu in proportion ; Reading Notices, 10 cents per line. 

TIIOS. J. BRADT, Muncie, Indiana. 



Canadian Dominion DirectoryJ870-7l. 



To wliirli will lir ;i(l,|.-(l Il,c I'l, ,\ inc.- <<\ N( 
puhliMlir.l ill MiiliMiilicr, 1^7t», by .l.iiis I.onki.i., , 
will loiiiiiiciKM' .•:irlv this Fall to tiikc the iiuiiic 
the priiicipnl iiiliabilants in the Cities, Towns ai 
to collect such iiiroiinalion as may be suited to tli 
be rcscrycd to lli<- hitfst pos>.ililc nioiiKiit. so that 



tainingtiK' names ;ii 
may he slated tliiil II 
the'Ag.iits, and Ilial 
be made iipio williii 
will be given in Ilie \ 
rency ; Ciiited SImIis 
ling; France, l.iiniii 
delivered. Pci-on- 
their orders for siibs' 



.'.oundland and I'riiu'e Kdward Island; to be 
MonlH'al, Canada. The SuIis.tiIht's .\s?ent^ 

ol the I'rolessional and Business Men. and of 
\ illau'es throiiLchout Ilie Six Proviuc<-s, and 

pairc's oltlic' Dii-eeloiy. The large eilies will 

n>- changes wliieh may haye oeenri'ed, up to 

,'enl lemen in I'aeh place will he solit'ileil to revise the proof sheets con- 
Iher inl'orniiilion eoiuK^eted with tlw localities in wlii<h they reside. U 
latter for the liiri'etory will he put in type as fast as it is rcci'ived from 
(■ rj/" it will III' /iriiili-d ojr'inilil ilir lust /ilace is taken, so that corrections may 
ew weeUs ol i)iit)lieatioii. Short ilcseriptions of at least :t,noO places 
k. Ti;itMS Ol- Si;iiS(Ki!-ii(»N : Dominion of Canada siibseribcrs, $12 eur- 
■ -ei i hers, !> 15 currency; (Jreat ISritain and Ireland suhs<riheis, £:! sler- 
\'-., subscribers, £3 sterling. No money to hi- paid until the work is 
irons of aiding in the publication of this DiUEcidUY will please send 
tionsand adverllscniPnts to .JOHN I.OVELE, I'rintvr and Publisher. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 349 

The New York Albion. 

THE BSST ADVERTISIIVG MEDIUM OF ITS cr,ASS 11% THE rJVITED STATES. 

Tlie most Cosmopolitan, Independent, and Entertaining Jonrnal of 
lilTBRATCRE, ART, POLITICS, FIIVAJVCE, FIEI.I> SPORTS, AIVD IVEWS, 

IN AMERICA. 

.««^ «^^?hiP„tP®J P"^'lis|ied for the family circle, the business and professional man the snorts 
1^^ ti^^l ®i general reader. It contains a greater variety of interesting, aniusing instructTvP 
and thoroughly wholesome readmg matter, than any other high-class welkly, and pasTes "'from 
grave to gay from lively to severe," in a manner attractive to all. It embodies the nlws of t}^ 
world carefully culled, and editorially discusses a wide ran^e of sulSs while the ntera^ 
Tiandsil provides are always of the choicest quality. ^uujci,ts, wuiie tne literary 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MORNING, AT 30 PARK ROW, NEW YORK. 

KinrAHAJV COK]VVVAI.I.IS, Editor and Proprietor. 

Subscription, with any one of the Albion Engravings, sent free by po.st ft.5 ner nnnnrr, 
strictly in advance. Subscription for months, si'.^O, and for 3 monthsf |12.5 C ei-4ien a^' 
teachers, $1 per annum, wi^'hout engravings. Single copies, for sale by all newsdeiSeririO cts 

Advertising Rates : 

Perline, each insertion, - - . . '>^ npnta 

Per line for four or more in.sertions - . .Tq " 

Perline for one year, standing unchanged, - - 15 u 

Two agate line business cards, with copy of the Albio.v free, $18 per annum. 
Notice to Advertisers.-The IVew York Albion circulates more extensivelv th«,-, a„^ 
other weekly journal of its. class among the most wealthy, cultivate™, ami Influenti.U 1 oonlP^? 
the United States, the Dominion of Canada, and other par s of British America tl?p\v,.^t?,lv 
funJ?^')^^ """"^ Central America, and is the best adveitisingmediumTn the 'UnUe^^^^^^^^^^ 
those desirous of reaching the Upper Ten Thousand. It has also a lar^ circiUation in W^ii 
Street and among the banks and bankers throughout the United State.s and the DomiSon 

Annnal Club Rates, to separate addresses, with a copy of any one of the Albinn stooi v^ 
sravmgs with each copy of the paper: For two copies, $9 in advance form^co^ifs Ufn" 
advance ; for ten copies, $3.5 in advance, with an extra copy to getter-up • for fifteen ^onil«*y^ 
m advance, with an extra copy; for twenty copies, $60 in advance with two exfi"c?pLT' * 



The Wledical Record, 

A SEMI-MONTHLY JOURNAL 

OF 

MEDICIJVE AlVD SURGERY, 

EDITED BT 

GEORGE F. SHRADY, M. D. 
Subscription Price, $4 a Year, . in Advance. 



ssiSMMsiillHSsiiii 

Advertising Rates : 

Amount of Space. l insertion ^ months, 

"6 insertions. 

&^p\fe or One column, '11'^ ''T^ 

tei^foTms:"^^^^^^''" .1^ ^^ 

One-eighth of column. 3 00 15 00 

VriI.t,IAM TVOOD & CO, 
Pnblisbers, Booksellers and Importers, 

61 Walker Street, IVew York. 



<i months. 


12 months. 


12 insertions. 


2-i insertions. 


$17.5 00 


$300 00 


110 00 


180 00 


75 00 


]-io m 


40 00 


15 00 


2.5 00 


40 



S50 AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Union Times. 



lAIOA. SOI Til <'AKOI.I\A. 

A WEEKLY JOIRNAL. THE OM-Y NEANsl'Al'EU rUJl.ISUED IN LMON COL.NTY, o:«E OF 

THE WEALTHIEST IN LTl'ER SOUTH CAIiOLINA. 

Table Rate.>i : 

(Ten lines Brn-ier make a si/iMj-e, and four and a half sipuires a fourth of a column.) 

laar 3mo., *5 00;t;mo., $7;9mo., $9: 1 yr.. $10 I 1-tcol ,3mo., *ir);6mo., $'2;{; 9mo., $33; lyr., $38 

4 •' 3 " 800:G " l-2;9 " li:; 1 •' 18 1-2 " 3 '• 25:6 '• 30;9 " 42;1 •' 50 

I " 3 " 1150;G " 16; 9 " 22; 1 •' 2(i | 1 " 3 '• nrf.ij '• 50; 9 " 75;] - EO 

Geo. p. Bowell & Co., Advoitisin}? .Vgents, New Y'ork. 

The Dearborn Independent. 

Best Cikcli.atiox in >i)i :tii-kasti:kn Indiana. 

:HO FOREIGN ADVEUTISEMENTS INSERTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED RY THE CASH IN 
ADVANCE, EXCEPT FROM OUR AUTHORIZED AGENTS. 

The Independent is the best local paper, and circulates among the most intelligent class 
of people in South-eastern Iiuliana. Address 

I>EA'TO:X & COBB. PnblisUers, Aurora, Indiana. 

Southern Enterprise. 

TENTH VOI^UMK, JAAl ARY, 1870. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY IN THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA. 
Advertising Bates— Per Square of Twelve Lines Solid Minion : 

1 square, 1 mo., $5; 3 mos., $12; G mos., $18 I 1-4 column, 1 mo., $14; 3 mos., $28; G mos., $35 

2 " 1 mo., 8; 3 mos., 18; 6 mos., 20 1-2 column, 1 mo., 15: 3 mos.. .«); 6 mos., 40 
4 •' 1 mo., 12; 3 mos., 25; 6 mos., :}0 | 1 column, 1 mo., 20: 3 nu)s., 40; G mos., 50 

Any ot the above spaces twelve months for 25 per cent, added. 
The Southern Knterpi-ise is one of the best advertising mediums in Southern Georgia, con- 
tiguous to Middle Flori<la. located in a flourisliing railroad town of 4.000 inhubiiauts, aiul the only 
paper published in Uk^ county of Thonuis. L. C. BRYAJV, Kditor and Fi-oprietor. 

The Bluffton Chronicle. 

PUBliISHED EVERY TIIURSnAY MOR3fIX« AT BLt FFTO>, ^VELLS CO., IWD. 

Is OXK OK THE lilCST .VOVERTISINd MKDH.MS IN THIS TAKT OF INDIANA. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION, - - - .'83 OO A YEAR, IN ADVANCE. 

Advertising Rates : 

1 sqr., 3 mos., $3 00; 1 j-r., $10 00 I 3 sqrs., 3 mos.. .«7 50; 1 yr., $17 .50 1 1-2 col,. 3 mos., $12 50; 1 yr., $30 

2 ' ' 3 " 5 50; 1 " 15 00 | 1-4 col., 3 ' 10 0t>;l " 20 00 | 1 '• 3 " 20 00;! " 60 

One square (10 lines), 50 cents for first inseition, and 25 cents for <!ach continuance (under 
three months). No advci-tisenient counted less than one square. Editorial and Local Notices, 
10 cents per line tor each insertion. 

The Berrien County Record 

Has double the circulation of any other iiolitical newspaper in South-western Michigan, and in 

printed on a sheet 28x42 inches, sihscuii tion, $2 per j'ear, in advance. 

Terms of Advertising : 



1 w. 2 w. 3 w. 1 m. 3 m. G m. 1 yr 

1 sq., $1 00 $1 .50 $1 75 $2 00 $4 00 $G 00 $10 00 

2sq., 175 2 50 3 00 3 50 (i 00 10 00 IG 00 

3 8q., 2 25 3 25 3 75 4 25 7 00 12 00 20 (Kl 

4 8q., 2 75 3 75 4 25 4 50 8 00 1 



1 w. 2 w. 3 w. 1 m. 3 m. G m. 1 vr. 
5 squ'rs, $3 .")0 $4 00 i? 1 M $5 00 »!lO 00 $17 00 $25 00 
1-4 col., 4 00 5 50 7 00 ,S 00 14 00 25 00 35 00 
1-2 col., GOO 10 00 1-2 00 15 00 2.'') 00 ;{."> (K) G.'iOO 
1 col'n, KMM) lUKl 17 00 20 00 ;i5 00 GO IK) 115 00 



Matter in Local column, 10 cents per line for each iuseitioii, Init no locals taken for less thau $1. 

I». A. WA<;M:K. rublixhtr. Buchanan, Mich. 

The Buckeye State. 

A large ami influential politi<'al. lilcrutN and lanuly new spapcr. The offlicial and leading- 
Republican paper of the county, riiljlisli.d nt New l,isboii, Golunddana County, Ohio, ou 
Thursday mornings, at 9'J a year in advaiu-e. or «a .'SO if not paid until the end of the year. 

Bates of Advertising : 
One square, 1 Inch, 1 insertion, $ I (K): lmo.,$2.')0; 3 mos., $4 00; li mos., $G 00; 1 year, $10 00 
OMe-fouilh column, one week, : oo: 1 •■ G oo: 3 '• [-i 00; G " is 00: 1 •■ 30 00 

One column, one insertion, $lo I One column, six months, - . . . ^>^ 

One column, one month, .... i,' | one coluniu, one year, .... loo 

U. I. VOI'.UG, Editor and Pi-oprietor. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK, 351 

Petersburg Republican^ 

A THIRTY-TWO COLUMN WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, 

rUlSLISHED AT 

PETERSlsrKG, ILLIIVOIS. 

CIRCULATION 1,000 COPIES, WHICH RENDERS THE KKPrBIilfAar A SUPfiPJOBr 
ADVICRTISING MEDIUM. 

The Republican is a live, readable " Radical Stieet," aud its circulation cxteiuU 
INTO ALL ADJOINING COUNTIES. 



Casli Rates of Advertisiug : 

One square (10 lines or less), one insertion, $1 00 I One column, one year, $70 00 

Eacli additional insertion, 50 | Half column, one year, 40 00 

One square three months, a 00 I One-third column, one year. 35 00 

One square, six months, 7 00 One-fourth column, one year. 26 00 

One square, one year, 10 00 I Business or professional cards (.> lines) , 8 00 

For specimen copies, send to 

J. T. Mc3rEi:t,Y, Editor and Proprietoi-. 



The Sidney Journal. 

A Bona-Fide Circulation of 1,000. 

THE BEST LOCAL PAPER IN THE STATE OF OHIO. 

THE OXLY REPUBLICAN PAP EJi IiV THE COUNTY. 

The Sidney Journal IS rUBLISHED IN SlUNEV, Ohio, EVEKY Fpjuav MormnG, 

BY TRE«iO & BIZ%'Kt,EY. 

Tlie Sidney Journal is acknowledged to be the best local paper in the State of Ohio, and 
its rapidly increasing circulation attests its merits. Sidney is one of the best towns in Ohio. 
It has good railroad facilities, and remarkable advantages for water power. The business men 
are enterprising and progressive. The county is one of the wealthiest in the State, and i» 
rapidly improving. For agricultural purposes it has no superior. 



Regular Rates of Advertising; : 



1 time, i times. 3 times. 1 month. 2 months. 3 months. 6 months. 1 year. 

One inch, f 1 00 J;l 2.5 $1 .50 $2 00 $3 00 %\ 00 $(! 00 $10 00 

Two inches, 2 00 2 .50 3 00 3 50 4 50 B 00 9 00 15 OO 

Three inches, 3 00 3 75 4 .50 5 00 (i 50 .s 00 12 00 20 00 

Four inches, 4 00 5 00 6 00 G 50 S 00 10 00 15 00 24 00 

Five inches, 5 00 fi 00 7 00 8 00 !i 00 12 00 18 00 27 00 

Quarter column, f, 00 7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 14 00 20 00 .30 00 

Half column, 10 00 12 00 14 00 15 00 18 00 22 00 30 00 50 00 

One column, it; 00 IS 00 20 00 22 00 2C 00 30 00 ,50 00 80 00 

Special ]Votices inserted at the rate of 10 cents for the first insertion per line, and five cents 
per line for each additional insertion. 



AMERICAN NEWSPAPER RATE-BOOK. 



The Missouri Presbyterian. 

PIBJLISHKO ^VKKKLY AT »it PliB TKAK. 

THE ONLY PRESBYTERIAN PAl'ER PUBLISHED IN MISSOURI. 

TfA* tL largo and constantly increasing circulation anionji the most Intelligent and appreciattr* 
clas.scs of readers in the .<tate. 

Al>VERTISIJfG RATIOS: 

One .^QUAitE— (Equal to one inch in depth.) 

One insertion, $1 00 1 Three months, $8 00 

Two " 1 7.T Six months, 12 00 

Four " 3 -25 1 One year, 20 00 

aS" Longer advertisements, same rates. 

CHAS. B. COX, l»iil>llsher, 212 IVorth Fiftli Street, St. I^oiUs, jMIo. 



Linn County Signal. 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. 

THOMAS G. 3VETVMAJV, Proprietor. 

Terms, 82 Per Anmun. 

AS AH A